Hear From Students on Crucial Election 2020 Issues

This is part three of our Election 2020 student content blog series. See part one and part two.

As we enter the presidential debates, give students the opportunity to hear from their peers on the relevant issues. Young people are raising their voices and participating in KQED’s Let’s Talk About Election 2020 Youth Media Challenge. Add your students’ voices to the conversation and sign up for the challenge here

The challenge is open to all middle and high school students through the inauguration in January 2021. Each audio or video commentary will be published on KQED Learn’s public showcase, and select pieces will be shared on KQED’s broadcast and digital channels through the end of the year.

This project comes with student and teacher supports to set your classroom up for success, whether you are in-person or remote this fall. The student sequence provides a step-by-step guide and the curricular toolbox for teachers is full of standards-aligned resources and sample lesson sequences.

Watch and listen to these examples to understand what students have to say about the central election issues.

Sponsored

Clare B. from Brodhead, WI shares her journey of learning about systemic racism in our country and makes the case for prison reform.
What if Everyone Disappeared?

Joshua W. and Jahmere R. from Redford, MI detail their experience with racism in their daily lives and call on the viewer to make a change.
Stand Against It

Asha D. from Redlands, CA describes her recent personal observations of the California wildfires and realization on the need for immediate action on climate change.
Burning Our Future

DJ A. from Oakland, CA questions how gun violence is framed in urban versus rural areas and lays out a plan for gun control.
My Solution for Gun Violence

Elfin S W. from Madison, WI calls for taxation as a solution for wealth inequality.
Eat the Rich!

Loved these student pieces? Come celebrate youth voice and civic engagement at the KQED Election 2020 Youth Media Screening, Wednesday, October 21 at 4pm PDT! This virtual event will feature even more powerful and diverse student commentaries on election issues that matter to them. The event, hosted by Myles Bess from Above the Noise, will feature a conversation with author Jason Reynolds, the Library of Congress national ambassador for young people's literature, followed by a live discussion with Myles and student media creators. 

Questions?  Email learn@kqed.org