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What the Massive Climate Change Bill Could Mean for You and the Planet
After decades of attempts to enact climate change legislation, the Senate passed a massive bill this weekend. The Inflation Reduction Act directs nearly $370 billion dollars in new spending to slash carbon emissions in the next eight years by giving Americans more access to clean energy. Robinson Meyer, staff writer at The Atlantic, will join us to break down what’s in the largest federal clean energy investment in U.S. history and what you need to know.

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9:00 am – 10:00 am
Forum
What the Massive Climate Change Bill Could Mean for You and the Planet
After decades of attempts to enact climate change legislation, the Senate passed a massive bill this weekend. The Inflation Reduction Act directs nearly $370 billion dollars in new spending to slash carbon emissions in the next eight years by giving Americans more access to clean energy. Robinson Meyer, staff writer at The Atlantic, will join us to break down what’s in the largest federal clean energy investment in U.S. history and what you need to know.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
Forum
What Makes a Summer Movie?
“Top Gun: Maverick,” the Tom Cruise-starring sequel to the 1986 Tom Cruise-starring classic, is topping this summer’s domestic box office — and it’s now the U.S.’ seventh highest-grossing film, ever. “Nope,” the third movie from horror visionary Jordan Peele, has friends swapping interpretations around the campfire. And “Minions: The Rise of Gru” wasn’t just a big hit with little kids, but also with teens who grew up with the franchise — and showed up to screenings in suits, calling themselves #GentleMinions. Whether it’s nonstop action, beach scenes or nostalgia, some films just scream “summer movie.” We want to hear from you: what makes a summer movie to you? Which movie do you revisit every summer? Why?
11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Here & Now
Closer Look at the Teacher Shortage
Medicare patients will see lower insulin costs once the Democrat's spending bill is law. But other people not on Medicare won't get relief. Here & Now considers what that means. And, teachers have faced a lot of challenges: the pandemic, a politicized curriculum. And now they're quitting. As kids return to school a closer look at the teacher shortage.
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
All Things Considered
Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, the program presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
The World
Kenya’s Presidential Election
The presidential election in Kenya. For many, it's about the economy. The cost of living there is through the roof. The World’s correspondent in Nairobi explains what's at stake, and what Kenya's voters want from their next leader. That story, and the rest of the day's news, on The World.
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
PBS NewsHour
The PBS NewsHour is an hour-long evening news broadcast, hosted by Judy Woodruff which offers news updates, analysis, live studio interviews, discussions...
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