Radio Daily ScheduleRadio Daily Schedule

Shows are scheduled in PST/PDT
12:00 am – 1:00 am
BBC World Service
A one-hour radio program that provides international news, analysis and information in English and 42 other languages. Their global network of correspondents provide impartial news and reports on location.
1:00 am – 2:00 am
World Affairs Council
Vaccine Alliance
If you live in the United States, there’s a good chance you’ve already been vaccinated, or at least have an appointment booked. But people who live in poorer nations aren’t so lucky. The U.S. recently joined COVAX, a global initiative aimed at creating equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines around the world. Anuradha Gupta, deputy CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, explains why vaccinating people in every country in the world is not only the right thing to do, but if we don’t do it, COVID-19 could mutate enough to make all our vaccines less effective. Then, Pakistani Senator Ayesha Raza Farooq talks about how to combat vaccine hesitancy, something she worked on during a polio outbreak in 2013. Farooq found that by talking to families about the vaccines in their own language and introducing them to victims of the disease, she was able to overcome vaccine hesitancy in Pakistan. Can these methods be used with COVID-19?
2:00 am – 9:00 am
Morning Edition
Private Prisons
  • 4:51 am – 5:00 amMarketplace Morning Report
  • 5:51 am – 6:00 amThe California Report
  • 6:42 am – 6:51 amPerspectives
  • 6:51 am – 7:00 amThe California Report
  • 7:51 am – 8:00 amMarketplace Morning Report
  • 8:42 am – 8:51 amPerspectives
  • 8:51 am – 9:00 amThe California Report
Privately run prisons were profiting during the Trump administration because of all the undocumented immigrants being put there. President Biden wants to phase those prisons out. But a lot of the facilities have found ways to keep doing business. The debate over detention.
9:00 am – 9:30 am
Forum
NPR’s Founding Mothers: Shattering Glass Ceilings in the 1970s
Even after the Civil Rights Act in 1964 banned employment discrimination, women in the workplace still found it nearly impossible to get the kind of jobs they really wanted and were qualified for. When National Public Radio launched 50 years ago, four women found their way into a world previously closed to them – broadcast journalism. They became icons – using their voices to fight sexism in the workplace and cover decades of news. We examine the amazing careers of “Susan, Linda, Nina & Cokie” with Lisa Napoli, author of “The Extraordinary Story of the Founding Mothers of NPR.”
9:30 am – 10:00 am
Forum
Financial Crisis at City of College San Francisco Clouds Future for Students and Faculty
A fiscal management team issued a dire warning earlier this month about the finances of City College of San Francisco, the city’s two-year community college which offers free tuition to all city residents. The devastating report concluded that the college could not meet its obligations to students, faculty and staff and remain solvent without making drastic changes. In March, noting it faced a $33 million budget shortfall for the upcoming academic year, City College announced that it would cut 163 full-time faculty and 34 administrative positions. As students and faculty rally to save classes and programs, the administration says its hands are tied by the fiscal morass caused by decreased enrollment and fiscal realities. We talk about the future of City College.
10:00 am – 10:30 am
Forum
KQED's live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.
10:30 am – 11:00 am
Forum
‘Ultramarathon Man’ Dean Karnazes on Achieving a Runner’s High
Dean Karnazes once ran 50 marathons in 50 states in 50 days. That was in 2006, not long after his memoir “Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner” became a national bestseller. His new book, "A Runner’s High: My Life in Motion," charts Karnazes’ return to the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run in his mid-50s. Once named one of the most influential people in the world by Time Magazine and a winner of the Badwater Ultramarathon and 4 Deserts Ultramarathon Series, Karnazes has a unique insight into the power and physicality of running. The “Ultramarathon Man” joins us to discuss what it means to achieve a runner’s high.
11:00 am – 1:00 pm
Here & Now
Native American Resilience
When the Seattle Indian Health Board asked for PPE last year, they got a box of body bags instead. How they turned that symbol of death into a symbol of Native American resilience, and all the day's important news.
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
The Takeaway
Sikh Community in Indianapolis
On Thursday, a gunman shot and killed eight people working in a FedEx warehouse in Indianapolis. Of the eight killed, four of the victims were Sikh. According to advocates from the Sikh community, the latest bout of violence emphasizes the prejudice and bigotry members of this community face. While law enforcement has yet to identify a motive for the violence, some believe the attack targeted the Sikh community and should be treated as a hate crime. A conversation about the tragedy in Indianapolis and how the Sikh community on the ground is processing the news.
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
The World
Each weekday, host Marco Werman and his team of producers bring you the world's most interesting stories in an hour of radio that reminds us just how small our planet really is.
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
PBS NewsHour
The PBS NewsHour is an hour-long evening news broadcast, hosted by Judy Woodruff which offers news updates, analysis, live studio interviews, discussions...
4:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Marketplace
Hoping for a Rebound
The pandemic didn’t just affect hotels. It also hurt the businesses that supply them. The story of one hotel food maker that’s hoping a travel rebound is just around the corner.
4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
All Things Considered
Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, the program presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.
6:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Marketplace
Hoping for a Rebound
The pandemic didn’t just affect hotels. It also hurt the businesses that supply them. The story of one hotel food maker that’s hoping a travel rebound is just around the corner.
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Fresh Air
Writer Lauren Hough
Growing up in the doomsday cult the Children of God, which was also a sex cult. Terry Gross talks with Lauren Hough, author of a new collection of personal essays. Hough also talks about being a lesbian air force airman during the don’t-ask-don’t-tell era; about working as a bouncer in a gay club; and as a cable guy.
8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
City Arts and Lectures
The Catastrophist: Lauren Gunderson + Nathan Wolfe
Playwright Lauren Gunderson’s work is often based on the lives of historical figures – scientists like Marie Curie and Isaac Newton, and political figures such as the first woman elected to Congress. Gunderson didn’t have to travel far to research her newest play “The Catastrophist” – the one-man play centers on her husband, virologist Nathan Wolfe. One of Wolfe’s areas of expertise is biological threats that can lead to pandemics. On April 8, 2021, Adam Savage talked to Gunderson and Wolfe about the play, their respective careers and the pandemic’s effect on theater.
9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
1A
1A is a show for a changing America. It convenes a conversation about the most important issues of our time. The show takes a deep and unflinching look at America, bringing context and insight to stories unfolding across the country and the world.With a name inspired by the First Amendment, 1A explores important issues such as policy, politics, technology, and what connects us across the fissures that divide the country. The program also delves into pop culture, sports, and humor. 1As goal is to act as a national mirror, taking time to help America look at itself and to ask what it wants to be. 1A airs Mondays through Thursdays from 11pm - 12 midnight.
10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Forum
KQED's live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.
11:00 pm – 12:00 am
BBC World Service
A one-hour radio program that provides international news, analysis and information in English and 42 other languages. Their global network of correspondents provide impartial news and reports on location.
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