Radio Daily ScheduleRadio Daily Schedule

Shows are scheduled in PST/PDT
12:00 am – 12:30 am
BBC World Service
A one-hour radio program that provides international news, analysis and information in English and 42 other languages. Their global network of correspondents provide impartial news and reports on location.
12:30 am – 1:00 am
The California Report Magazine
The Cost of Maintaining the Food Supply: COVID Deaths at Foster Farms
Last year, California’s Foster Farms became the site of one of the nation’s deadliest COVID-19 outbreaks at a meat or poultry plant. The California Report’s Central Valley reporter, Alex Hall, spent a year and a half talking to spouses and family members of workers who spent decades at the company’s chicken-processing plants. She found that hundreds of Foster Farms workers tested positive for the virus in 2020. 16 people died and at least 20 others were hospitalized. Hall’s investigation shows that as plants stayed open to maintain the food supply, and workers got sick from COVID-19, or even died, Foster Farms didn’t always give a complete picture of the problem to health officials, state regulators and their own employees. We meet two families who lost loved ones who worked at Foster Farms, and are grieving, struggling financially, and trying to make sense of what happened.
1:00 am – 2:00 am
Science Friday
Human Ancestry
You may think you’re a modern human being. But scattered through your genome are traces of Neanderthals, Denisovans, and other ancient lineages. So how much of you is actually uniquely human -- and what are the genetic factors that set us apart from ancient relatives?
2:00 am – 3:00 am
World Affairs Council
Sustainable Development in a Post-Covid World
In this episode, we’re looking at how sustainable development goals can serve as a guide to pandemic recovery, and how they’re being used in cities from Pittsburgh to Bogotá to increase health and equity. First, we talk with Mamta Murthi, VP of human development at the World Bank, about the World Health Organization’s decision to endorse the first vaccine for malaria, a preventable disease that kills around 500,000 people a year, mostly children in Africa. Then, we talk with global development veteran Tony Pipa and Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, about a bottom-up approach cities and communities are taking to drive local progress with the goal of making global change.
3:00 am – 4:00 am
Inside Europe
News From The Continent
NATO-Russia relations at post-Cold War low - Assault on democracy: the murder of a British MP - Food for thought at the Frankfurt Book Fair - An apology to the Algerian auxiliaries abandoned by France - Hungary's opposition unites against Orban - How to Restore an ecosystem near you - A seasonal peek into an Italian wardrobe - Scottish climate politics as Glasgow prepares to host COP26
4:00 am – 4:30 am
KQED Newsroom
Something Beautiful: Sausalito Houseboats
This week’s look at Something Beautiful is Sausalito’s colorfully painted houseboats, which artists like Otis Redding, Jean Varda and Shel Silverstein flocked to in the 1960s. Today, there are over four hundred houseboats bobbing in this Richardson Bay community.
4:30 am – 5:00 am
Washington Week
Biden’s Agenda on The Line, Bannon in Contempt
As the pressure to pass President Biden’s Build Back Better infrastructure plans mounts, The Washington Week panel will dissect what’s included in Biden’s economic agenda—from changes to the social safety net and major investments in climate and education. The panel will also discuss the ongoing battle in Congress over voting rights. This week also saw major developments in the January 6 investigation, with the House select committee unanimously voting in support of holding Stephen K. Bannon in contempt, and Trump filing suit against the National Archives to keep his presidential records sealed.
5:00 am – 10:00 am
Weekend Edition Saturday
From civil wars in Bosnia and El Salvador, to hospital rooms, police stations, and America's backyards, National Public Radio®'s Peabody Award-winning correspondent Scott Simon brings a well-traveled perspective to his role as host of Weekend Edition.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Dysfunction With Democrats, and Wealth In ‘Succession’
On this episode of, Sam talks to NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson on how dysfunction in the Democratic Party is delaying President Biden's "Build Back Better" spending bill in Congress. Then, The New Yorker television critic Doreen St. Félix joins Sam to discuss the third season of Succession, and why so many popular shows follow wealthy, white characters behaving badly. Later, they're joined by The New York Times metro reporter Jazmine Hughes for a game of Who Said That? Plus, an interview with two true crime podcast hosts, Connie Walker and Jonquilyn Hill, about media coverage disparities across race in missing persons cases.
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!
Ron and Clint Howard
Legendary Hollywood brothers Clint and Ron Howard, authors of the new memoir, The Boys, play our game called, “Mayberry, Maybe Not Berry.” And the panelists are Alonzo Bodden, Maz Jobrani and Karen Chee.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
This American Life
Audience of One
In a world where a virus spreads across the country and most people are not going to movie theaters, we bring the movies to you.
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Snap Judgment
Spooked: The Final Reckoning
‘Tis the season of the shadow! Snap Judgment proudly presents our evil-twin podcast, Spooked. Spooked features supernatural stories told by people that can barely believe it happened themselves. Jen is about to start an internship at a museum. But this isn’t a typical museum… it’s built inside two old, historic mansions. By this time, the original owners of these two old homes are long gone–or are they? And a night nurse dedicated to his job loves to help people. But when spirits of former patients reach out to him, he’s not sure if he can care for them.
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Radiolab
Birdie in the Cage
People have been doing the square dance since before the Declaration of Independence. But does that mean it should be THE American folk dance? What would it mean for a dance to be of the people, by the people, and for the people?
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Freakonomics Radio
Can Love Cure Our Toxic Political System?
Arthur Brooks is an economist who for 10 years ran the American Enterprise Institute, one of the most influential conservative think tanks in the world. He has come to believe there is only one weapon that can defeat our extreme political polarization: love. Is Brooks a fool for thinking this — and are you perhaps his kind of fool? And: Trader Joe’s, the quirky little grocery chain with California roots and German ownership has a lot to teach all of us about choice architecture, efficiency, frugality, collaboration, and team spirit.
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Reveal
Mississippi Goddam Chapter 2: The Aftermath
On the morning of Billey Joe Johnson’s death, crime scene tape separates the Johnsons from their son’s body. Their shaky faith in the criminal justice system begins to buckle. As Billey Joe Johnson’s family tries to get answers about his death, they get increasingly frustrated with the investigation. They feel that law enforcement, from the lead investigator to the district attorney, are keeping them out of the loop. While a majority white grand jury rules that Johnson’s death was accidental, members of the family believe the possibility of foul play was never properly investigated.
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
All Things Considered
Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, the program presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our Body Politic
A Haitian Author on Her Family’s Immigration Story, Celebrating and Supporting Black Women in the Media, and What We Lose Politically with the Death of Colin Powell
Host Farai Chideya talks with award-winning writer Edwidge Danticat about why it’s important to tell specific stories that complicate the immigrant narrative in the U.S. Writer Zeba Blay shares insights from her new book about Black women in pop culture, “Carefree Black Girls.” TV and filmmaker Felicia Pride discusses her focus on Honeys in her work in entertainment. And on Sippin’ the Political Tea, foreign policy expert Hagar Chemali and Leah Wright Rigueur of Johns Hopkins University, a leading expert on Black Republicans, join Farai to discuss the significance of the death of one of the last moderate Black conservatives, Colin Powell.
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Live Wire
Cristina Costantini & Kareem Tabsch, and Anaïs Mitchell
Host Luke Burbank and announcer Elena Passarello get into the spooky season and share some memorable Halloween costumes; filmmakers Cristina Costantini & Kareem Tabsch reveal the man behind the cape in their Netflix documentary Mucho Mucho Amor about famed Puerto Rican astrologer Walter Mercado; and singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell takes us to the underworld of Greek mythology to discuss her Tony Award-winning folk opera Hadestown, before performing one of its hit tracks "Wedding Song."
8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Selected Shorts
Survival Skills
Guest host Roxane Gay presents two stories about making things work out, though sometimes at a cost. In “Loose Change,” by Andrea Levy, performed by Eve Best, a well-off Londoner has a strange encounter in an art gallery, one that recalls a pivotal moment in her family’s past. In Manuel Munoz’s "Anyone Can Do It,” a poor woman takes a risk in order to provide for her family. The reader is Monica Raymund.
9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Radio Specials
Afraid to Look
In this hour, stories of nerves, anxiety, fear! And the courage and support that allow us to overcome. A phone call, a taxi ride, and a stranger's generosity of spirit. Amanda Stern reaches a breaking point with her anxiety. Tim Manley's repressed feelings start to manifest themselves physically. Nervous bride-to-be Anoush Froundjian introduces her fiancé to her Armenian traditions. Cheryl Murfin forgets something important in the parking lot of the grocery story. Devan Sandiford finds the courage to talk to his mother about the family's past.
10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
This American Life
Audience of One
In a world where a virus spreads across the country and most people are not going to movie theaters, we bring the movies to you.
11:00 pm – 12:00 am
Snap Judgment
Spooked: The Final Reckoning
‘Tis the season of the shadow! Snap Judgment proudly presents our evil-twin podcast, Spooked. Spooked features supernatural stories told by people that can barely believe it happened themselves. Jen is about to start an internship at a museum. But this isn’t a typical museum… it’s built inside two old, historic mansions. By this time, the original owners of these two old homes are long gone–or are they? And a night nurse dedicated to his job loves to help people. But when spirits of former patients reach out to him, he’s not sure if he can care for them.
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