Radio Daily ScheduleRadio Daily Schedule

Shows are scheduled in PST/PDT
12:00 am – 12:30 am
BBC World Service
A one-hour radio program that provides international news, analysis and information in English and 42 other languages. Their global network of correspondents provide impartial news and reports on location.
12:30 am – 1:00 am
The California Report Magazine
California’s Hidden Gems
We take you to some of the best secret spots across the state, places most tourists -- and longtime Californians alike -- don’t know about. Here's where we're headed: Fern Canyon, Humboldt County, where Steven Spielberg chose to film part of Jurassic Park. The Beauty Bubble, Palm Desert: It’s part salon, part museum and a whole lot of roadside attraction. Mystery Spot, Santa Cruz Mountains, an 81-year-old, disorienting, dizzying Historical Landmark. Shuei-Do Manju Shop, San Jose, a tiny treat shop has been a Japantown staple since 1953. Lady Chicken and Rice, Goshen, a deep-fried Lao chicken food truck whose popularity goes well beyond this tiny community. McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park, which Roosevelt once called one of the wonders of the world.
1:00 am – 2:00 am
Science Friday
SOS Nuclear / Fauci Kids Book
Once you shut down a nuclear power plant, what do you do with the hot stuff in it? A look at the unsolved problem of storing long lived nuclear waste. Plus a new biography of Dr. Anthony Fauci … written for kids.
2:00 am – 3:00 am
World Affairs Council
Why A Major Immigration Law Might Be Unconstitutional
Nearly 100 years ago, Congress passed a law making it a felony to reenter the US after being deported. Known as Section 1326, this obscure line of immigration code is the most prosecuted federal crime in America. Now, a federal judge has declared it unconstitutional and racist. In this week’s episode, we look at the far-reaching effects of a single deportation after the 2019 ICE raid of a chicken processing plant in Mississippi. Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Emily Green tells us the story of Edgar Lopez, a grandfather of four who was killed trying to make his way back home to the US. Then, we talk with historian Kelly Lytle-Hernandez and legal scholar Ahilan Arulanantham about the origins of this law and why it might be unconstitutional.
3:00 am – 4:00 am
Inside Europe
Geopolitical Realignment
AUKUS and the fallout from France’s nuclear snub-marine. Digging for trouble: we get to the bottom of a neighbourly dispute along the Czech /Polish border. Clamouring for justice: will relatives of the victims of Malaysian Airways -Flight 17 finally be able to find closure? An unlikely ally mourns the end of the Merkel era. Things get quirky with a tall tale from the Netherlands, and a British comedy actor granted honorary citizenship in Serbia.
4:00 am – 4:30 am
KQED Newsroom
This weekly news series features award-winning journalists, engaging roundtable discussions, in-depth reporting and analysis from all KQED News sources, and interviews with newsmakers and Bay Area innovators. It premieres Fridays at 7pm on KQED Public Television 9, and repeats over the weekend on both KQED and KQED Plus. It also airs Sundays at 9:30pm on KQED Public Radio 88.5 FM, and online at kqed.org/kqednewsroom.
4:30 am – 5:00 am
Washington Week
The Migrant Crisis and Political Peril
The fate and treatment of the thousands of Haitian migrants camped under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas dominated the headlines this week. The Biden administration is facing bipartisan criticism for the crisis after images surfaced of Border Patrol agents’ aggressive treatment of the migrants. Meanwhile, Republicans continue to navigate the fallout from President Trump’s “Big Lie,” the Jan. 6th Capitol riot, and his continued grip over the party. And the new book, “Peril,” released this week and written by Bob Woodward and former Washington Week moderator Robert Costa, has revealed more about the former President’s attempts to overturn the 2020 election and keep hold of power.
5:00 am – 10:00 am
Weekend Edition Saturday
From civil wars in Bosnia and El Salvador, to hospital rooms, police stations, and America's backyards, National Public Radio®'s Peabody Award-winning correspondent Scott Simon brings a well-traveled perspective to his role as host of Weekend Edition.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
COVID Forever?
Is COVID sticking around forever? Sam talks to The Atlantic staff writer Katherine Wu about continuing to live with COVID, what we might expect in the future, and how to come to terms with it. Then, Sam is joined by playwright Heidi Schreck and actress Cassie Beck, who are currently in rehearsals for the upcoming tour of the Broadway play What The Constitution Means to Me. As live theater returns, they talk about what the last 18 months have been like for theater, what the situation is like now, and how theater has changed for the long term. They also play Who Said That? Plus, an interview with author Brandon Taylor about his books, Real Life and Filthy Animals, as part of a collaboration with the Library of Congress National Book Festival.
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! is NPR's weekly hour-long quiz program. Each week on the radio you can test your knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. On the Web, you can play along too.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
This American Life
Stuck in the Middle
People caught in limbo, using ingenuity and guile to try to get themselves out. Rachel and her husband are in the middle of negotiating the desires of two very strong willed kids, one of whom wants the whole family to eat vegetarian. Sara Corbett's father-in-law is become obsessed with a limbo most of us hate – the music he hears whenever he's on hold. An agunah is a woman whose husband refuses to give her a divorce – in Hebrew it means "chained wife." If you're an Orthodox Jew, strictly following Jewish law, the only real way to get divorced is if your husband agrees to hand you a piece of paper called a get. Without the get, women who want out of their marriages can stay chained to their husbands for years. In New York, a couple of rabbis were recently accused of using violence to force men to give their wives a get. Brett Martin documents a previously unnoticed human phenomenon, one that involves airplanes...crying...and Reese Witherspoon.
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Snap Judgment
Backstage II
We’ve brought your favorite Snap storytellers from around the world Backstage again, sharing the real stories that bubble up when the stage lights go down. Dino Archie, Shannon Cason, Dr. Ray Christian, Joyce Lee, and Don Reed join Glynn to spar about problematic side dishes, code-switching, and skin-lightening cream.
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Radiolab
Help!
What do you do when your own worst enemy is...you? Radiolab looks for ways to gain the upper hand over those forces inside us—from unhealthy urges, to creative insights—that seem to have a mind of their own. We meet a Cold War negotiator who, in order to quit smoking, backs himself into a tactical corner, and we visit a clinic in Russia where patients turn to a radical treatment to help fight their demons. Plus, Elizabeth Gilbert on doing battle with your muses.
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Freakonomics Radio
The U.S.’ Child Poverty Rates
The U.S. has the highest G.D.P. in the world, yet it has one of the highest child-poverty rates among wealthy nations. This week on Freakonomics Radio: Stephen Dubner speaks with Senator Mitt Romney, Boston Mayor Kim Janey, and a host of experts to try to find out why — and what Washington plans to do about it.
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Reveal
Doctors Without Borders’ Institutional Racism
For decades, Doctors Without Borders has been admired for bringing desperately needed medical care to crises around the globe and pioneering modern-day humanitarian aid. It’s an organization with radical roots, promising to do whatever it takes to deliver life-saving care to people in need. But now, it’s struggling to address institutional racism. In summer 2020, over 1,000 current and former staffers wrote a letter calling out institutional racism at MSF. We talk about what can change in humanitarian aid.
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
All Things Considered
Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, the program presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our Body Politic
How Extremists View the Media
Host Farai Chideya shares her experience at the “Justice for J6” rally and talks about how extremists view the media with reporter Chris Jones of the outlet 100 Days in Appalachia. Wes Moore, who’s running for governor in Maryland, says his ancestors facing white supremacists inspires his political career. Rue Mapp of Outdoor Afro helps others realize that “nature never closes.” And in a special roundtable, Anthea Butler and Robert P. Jones, two experts on religion and politics, explore how white evangelical Christianity is linked to extremism in the U.S.
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Live Wire
Mary Norris, Ryan O'Connell, and Dirty Revival
Host Luke Burbank and announcer Elena Passarello share some favorite words submitted by listeners; grammar expert Mary Norris recounts her early days as a copy editor at The New Yorker and her foray into all things Greek; actor and television writer Ryan O’Connell explains how keeping his cerebral palsy a secret inspired his book and Netflix series Special; soul-rock group Dirty Revival tear down the house with “Pipe Dreams.”
8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Selected Shorts
Outcasts in Love
Guest host Maulik Pancholy presents two stories in which social outliers strive for love. In “Tandolfo the Great,” by Richard Bausch, a sad-sack children’s clown falls head over heels—without a banana peel. Michael Ian Black is the reader. And American master Carson McCullers presents a complex theory about the nature of love, from a surprising source: a down-at-heels guy in a diner. Lance Reddick reads “A Tree, A Rock, a Cloud.”
9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
The Moth Radio Hour
Oh, Brother
In this hour, an ode to brothers. Family ties and secrets, fraternal bonds and sibling pranks. This episode is hosted by Moth Senior Director Jenifer Hixson. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media.
10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
This American Life
Stuck in the Middle
People caught in limbo, using ingenuity and guile to try to get themselves out. Rachel and her husband are in the middle of negotiating the desires of two very strong willed kids, one of whom wants the whole family to eat vegetarian. Sara Corbett's father-in-law is become obsessed with a limbo most of us hate – the music he hears whenever he's on hold. An agunah is a woman whose husband refuses to give her a divorce – in Hebrew it means "chained wife." If you're an Orthodox Jew, strictly following Jewish law, the only real way to get divorced is if your husband agrees to hand you a piece of paper called a get. Without the get, women who want out of their marriages can stay chained to their husbands for years. In New York, a couple of rabbis were recently accused of using violence to force men to give their wives a get. Brett Martin documents a previously unnoticed human phenomenon, one that involves airplanes...crying...and Reese Witherspoon.
11:00 pm – 12:00 am
Snap Judgment
Backstage II
We’ve brought your favorite Snap storytellers from around the world Backstage again, sharing the real stories that bubble up when the stage lights go down. Dino Archie, Shannon Cason, Dr. Ray Christian, Joyce Lee, and Don Reed join Glynn to spar about problematic side dishes, code-switching, and skin-lightening cream.
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