Radio Daily ScheduleRadio Daily Schedule

Shows are scheduled in PST/PDT
12:00 am – 12:30 am
BBC World Service
A one-hour radio program that provides international news, analysis and information in English and 42 other languages. Their global network of correspondents provide impartial news and reports on location.
12:30 am – 1:00 am
The California Report Magazine
A Day in the Life of One OUSD Teacher
It’s been almost a year since schools shut down in-person classes, and distance learning is taking a toll on students and parents. It’s also taking a toll on teachers, especially those with kids. KQED’s Vanessa Rancaño follows one Oakland teacher, with three young kids of her own, for a day.
1:00 am – 2:00 am
Science Friday
Baby Teeth
Do you just know when a conversation should end? Most of the time, you’re probably wrong. Plus, your questions about baby teeth answered, and an update on the hunt for the Tasmanian tiger.
2:00 am – 3:00 am
World Affairs Council
Why the Solarwinds Cyberattack Was Inevitable
Computer security experts at the Department of Homeland Security sighed in relief after seeing minimal Russian interference in the 2020 elections. What they didn’t realize was that hackers were in the process of performing what might be the largest and most sophisticated cyberattack on the United States. SolarWinds is named after the software hackers used to breach computers throughout the federal government, including nuclear labs and the Department of Homeland Security, the agency charged with keeping us safe. Today, more than 35 countries have the technology to perform a major attack on the U.S. while only nine have nuclear capabilities. In fact, cyberattacks are much easier to get away with because they’re hard to track and retaliate against. New York Times reporters David Sanger and Nicole Perlroth join World Affairs to talk about the threat of cyberwarfare, how the United States is uniquely vulnerable and whether or not there is something we can do to prevent it.
3:00 am – 4:00 am
Inside Europe
Vaccines in Europe
The European Medicines Agency is expected to approve the Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine next week. That would provide a shot in the arm for the slow roll out of vaccination campaigns across the EU. Impatience with the shortage of COVID vaccines in the bloc is causing some member states to look for shots outside it. Austria and Denmark are on a mission to build a vaccine alliance with Israel. Kerry Skyring reports from Vienna.
4:00 am – 4:30 am
KQED Newsroom
This Week in California Politics
Political experts analyze the state’s latest push to reopen schools, how that will impact the recall campaign against Gov. Gavin Newsom and who could become California’s next attorney general.
4:30 am – 5:00 am
Washington Week
The Future of American Democracy
It's been a busy week on Capitol Hill. Late Wednesday night, the House passed the “For the People Act,” a sweeping campaign finance and voting rights reform bill, as a very divided country battles over how to vote, who gets to vote, and fair and equitable voting overall.
5:00 am – 10:00 am
Weekend Edition Saturday
From civil wars in Bosnia and El Salvador, to hospital rooms, police stations, and America's backyards, National Public Radio®'s Peabody Award-winning correspondent Scott Simon brings a well-traveled perspective to his role as host of Weekend Edition.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
‘Detransition, Baby’
Author Torrey Peters tackles themes of identity, commitment, parenthood and divorce in her new book “Detransition, Baby.” And she suggests how readers, trans and cis alike, can view the moment we're all living through right now with a trans lens.
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! is NPR's weekly hour-long quiz program. Each week on the radio you can test your knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. On the Web, you can play along too.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
This American Life
Warriors in the Garden
Last spring, reporter Saidu Tejan Thomas Jr. began following three members of a Black activist group called Warriors in the Garden. They’d come together to protest the murder of George Floyd. Saidu wanted to see how far they could get as they faced off with police. They were unified, loud and impressive, but over time these three friends end up in three very different places.
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Snap Judgment
Beyond ‘Faces of Death’
In the mid-70s, Conan was hired to direct and produce a nature documentary. But he wanted to do something more ambitious. The film he made became one of the most infamous movies ever, but his success came with deadly consequences.
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Radiolab
The Other Latif: Ep 3
Latif turns his focus to Sudan, where his namesake spent time working on a sunflower farm. What could be suspicious about that? Latif scrutinizes the evidence to try to discover whether – as Abdul Latif’s lawyer insists – it was just an innocent clerical job, or – as the government alleges – it was where he decided to become an extremist fighter.
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Freakonomics Radio
16 Years at the Top
Jeff Immelt became CEO of General Electric a few days before September 11, 2001. But that was just the start of his troubles. Freakonomics interviews Immelt about his 16 years at the top of one of America's most famous corporations — what went right, what went wrong and what he would have done differently.
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Reveal
The Unpaid Cost of Elder Care
As the population of Americans over 65 rises, families are increasingly choosing to place loved ones in long-term assisted care facilities called residential care homes. With 24-hour care and individualized attention in a home-like setting, these smaller, more intimate alternatives to the traditional nursing home seem like the perfect place for Mom or Grandpa. They're more affordable, too. But that affordability masks an ugly truth: Workers doing the day-to-day work of caring for America's older adults are being exploited.
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
All Things Considered
Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, the program presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our Body Politic
Favorite Interviews
As the crew recharges, Our Body Politic presents some favorite interviews with thinkers, writers and politicians. Sen. Tammy Duckworth talks about how her service in the military inspires her political leadership, including her advocacy for veterans and people with disabilities. Investor Nathalie Molina Niño explains why it makes business sense to see entrepreneurship by women of color as an investment opportunity. Professor Steven Thrasher explains the ableism that seeps into talk of COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on communities of color, and the creation of what he calls a “viral underclass.”
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Live Wire
Matthew Gavin Frank; Davy Rothbart & Cheryl Sanford; Andrew Bird & Jimbo Mathus
Host Luke Burbank and announcer Elena Passarello talk birds of all kinds this week; writer Matthew Gavin Frank discusses the controversial world of diamond-smuggling pigeons; filmmaker Davy Rothbart and his subject Cheryl Sanford unpack 20 years of filming her family in their documentary “17 Blocks”; and musicians Andrew Bird & Jimbo Mathus, former bandmates of Squirrel Nut Zippers, perform "Sweet Oblivion" from their new collaborative album “These 13.”
8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Selected Shorts
Dance in America
Guest host Jane Kaczmarek presents works celebrating dance. A domineering mother uses an evening at the ballet to find fault in "My Mother Explains the Ballet to Me,” by Jesse Eisenberg, performed by Patricia Kalember. A pioneering African American dancer remembers an audition in “Léonide Massine,” by Janet Collins, performed by Carmen de Lavallade. A magical garment transforms its owner in “The Cape,” by Ben Loory, performed by Tony Yazbeck. And the “Tango” undermines a stuffy WASP community in this funny story by Kurt Vonnegut, performed by Tony Shalhoub.
9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
The Moth Radio Hour
Mighty: Bull, Pen, Gun
An author who treasures the art of letter-writing is spellbound by an inmate who becomes a pen pal, a man comes to terms with a personal tragedy caused by a gun, and a writer describes how Ernest Hemingway persuades him to risk his life by pretending to be a matador. Hosted by The Moth’s Artistic Director Catherine Burns.
10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
This American Life
Warriors in the Garden
Last spring, reporter Saidu Tejan Thomas Jr. began following three members of a Black activist group called Warriors in the Garden. They’d come together to protest the murder of George Floyd. Saidu wanted to see how far they could get as they faced off with police. They were unified, loud and impressive, but over time these three friends end up in three very different places.
11:00 pm – 12:00 am
Snap Judgment
Beyond ‘Faces of Death’
In the mid-70s, Conan was hired to direct and produce a nature documentary. But he wanted to do something more ambitious. The film he made became one of the most infamous movies ever, but his success came with deadly consequences.
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