Radio Daily ScheduleRadio Daily Schedule

Shows are scheduled in PST/PDT
12:00 am – 12:30 am
BBC World Service
A one-hour radio program that provides international news, analysis and information in English and 42 other languages. Their global network of correspondents provide impartial news and reports on location.
12:30 am – 1:00 am
The California Report Magazine
‘A Butterfly With My Wings Cut Off:’ A Transgender Asylum Seeker’s Quest to Come To California
When she turned 15, Luna Guzman, like many girls in Guatemala, celebrated with a quinceañera. But it was a secret party, with a borrowed dress, because her family couldn't fathom her as a transgender girl. So she put her soccer jerseys back on and tried to pass as the boy she knew she wasn’t inside. Even as she dealt with brutal violence, she decided to take a terrible risk and leave everything behind in Guatemala, to try to find a life in California: the one place in the world where she could imagine being safe. Being herself. Host Sasha Khokha has followed Luna Guzman over the last two years, reporting from a migrant shelter in Tijuana, an ICE detention center in San Diego, and a tiny drag bar in Modesto. Her story says a lot about how U.S. immigration policy fails when it comes to recognizing people who live outside the gender binary, how the epic backlog of asylum cases in the U.S. can add to their trauma, and how transgender migrants at the border are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19.
1:00 am – 2:00 am
Science Friday
A Return to Second Life
In the early aughts, Science Friday built an island in the online virtual world called Second Life. But the island had to be shut down. On the next Science Friday, revisiting that Second Life and a conversation about what happens to people when their virtual worlds disappear?
2:00 am – 3:00 am
World Affairs Council
What Biden Can Do to Secure Our Climate Future
When Joe Biden ran for president, he pledged to make climate change a major priority. How will he make good on that promise, and what are the consequences if he fails to act? World Affairs discusses climate policy with former California Gov. Jerry Brown, oceanographer Sylvia Earle and former Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos, 2016 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Then, a visit to Paradise, California, site of the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in the state’s history.
3:00 am – 4:00 am
Inside Europe
Migrants and Refugees on the Balkan Route Face Perilous Conditions
The International Organization for Migration is waring that people sleeping on Bosnia’s border with Croatia will die if not given proper shelter. More than 3000 people could be exposed tow inter weather. The organization has also called for an investigation into repeated allegations of violence against migrants.
4:00 am – 4:30 am
KQED Newsroom
California Churches Fight to Stay Open
The U.S. Supreme Court intervened Thursday on behalf of several California churches who are petitioning to be allowed to hold indoor services despite Gov. Gavin Newsom’s public health orders limiting them during the pandemic. With tighter restrictions looming statewide this month, we talk to church leaders about why they believe conducting indoor services is important.
4:30 am – 5:00 am
Washington Week
President Trump Defies Election Results As Pandemic Surges
Thursday marked exactly one month since Election Day. But President Trump is still refusing to concede, even as President-elect Joe Biden’s victories in Arizona and Wisconsin, two key battleground states, were certified this week.
5:00 am – 10:00 am
Weekend Edition Saturday
From civil wars in Bosnia and El Salvador, to hospital rooms, police stations, and America's backyards, National Public Radio®'s Peabody Award-winning correspondent Scott Simon brings a well-traveled perspective to his role as host of Weekend Edition.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Life in the Time of Coronavirus
"What has this pandemic been like for you?" When we put that question to people, the answers we got depended a lot on where they were in life — if they were in school, if they had a job, if they had lost a loved one, if they were vulnerable to the virus. So in this special episode of It's Been a Minute, we'll hear from people of all ages, from all over the country — and world — about how their lives, from young to old, have changed forever.
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!
Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! is NPR's weekly hour-long quiz program. Each week on the radio you can test your knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. On the Web, you can play along too.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
This American Life
The Magic Show
Just a few years before he got the internship at NPR that started him in radio, our host Ira Glass had another career. He performed magic at children's birthday parties. A powerful sense of embarrassment has prevented him from ever doing an episode on the subject, but when he learned that producer David Kestenbaum was also a kid conjurer, they decided to dive in together.
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Snap Judgment
Beautiful
Lawrence “Binkey” Tolefree gets a phone call about a huge opportunity. But it’s the next call from his mom that leads to the most surprising performance of his career. And Nygel Turner shares what it’s like to live with Gynecomastia (aka Man Boobs).
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Radiolab
The Great Vaccinator
Until now, the fastest vaccine ever made - for mumps - took four years. And while our current effort to develop a COVID-19 vaccine involves thousands of people working around the clock, the mumps vaccine was developed almost exclusively by one person: Maurice Hilleman. Hilleman cranked out more than 40 other vaccines over the course of his career, including 8 of the 14 routinely given to children. He arguably saved more lives than any other single person. And through his work, Hilleman embodied the instincts, drive, and guts it takes to marshall the human body’s defenses against a disease. But through him we also see the struggle and the costs of these monumental scientific efforts.
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Freakonomics Radio
How Effective Are Ads?
Advertisements are seemingly everywhere — which must mean they work, right? This week on Freakonomics Radio, leading researchers and a marketing executive examine the TV and digital ad industries — and why it’s so hard to measure their effectiveness.
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Reveal
Reproducing Racism
As racial disparities in health come into the spotlight amid COVID-19, we explore how the legacy of racism affects maternal health in the U.S.
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
All Things Considered
Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, the program presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Our Body Politic
Dallas Police Chief Renee Hall on Being Fully Black and Fully Blue
This week Farai Chideya talks to Dallas Chief of Police Reneé Hall about her career in law enforcement at a time of rising consciousness across the nation. Dr. Kavita Trivedi explains the intricacies of Covid testing and why it’s important to keep safety protocols in place. Reporter Ruth Umoh makes the connection between student debt and entrepreneurship, and Errin Haines gives us an update on the incoming stars of the Biden-Harris White House. Plus, a higher education leader on how students and colleges are coping during Covid, and searching for a shared history with author Morgan Jerkins.
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Live Wire
Abbi Jacobson, Nicole Chung, and The Dip
Host Luke Burbank and Elena Passarello dream up their post-pandemic travels; star and co-creator of Broad City Abbi Jacobson recounts the highs and lows her solo cross-country road trip, as illustrated in her New York Times bestselling essay collection I Might Regret This; writer Nicole Chung discusses her journey to discover the difficult truth behind her own adoption, which formed the basis of her debut book All You Can Ever Know; and seven-piece soul ensemble The Dip perform their single “Atlas.”
8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Selected Shorts
Rites & Rituals
Guest host David Sedaris offers three stories that question social rites. “Cultural Relativity” is Charles Johnson’s witty retelling of a classic fairy tale; it’s read by Regina King. Zadie Smith reads her own “Lazy River”—ostensibly about a failed holiday in Spain, but also a deft satire about Brexit, class, and exploitation. And the cantankerous spinster in Jean Stafford’s “The Hope Chest” has a Dickensian moment of grace. Dana Ivey is the reader.
9:00 pm – 10:00 pm
The Moth Radio Hour
Pizza, Polar Bears, and Rock Stars
A woman attempts to cross the Arctic solo with a dog team, an Orthodox Jewish boy tests God by eating pizza, a woman in her underwear sprints past a neighbor’s confused girlfriend, and Guns N’ Roses bass player Duff McKagan survives a health scare. Storytellers: Pam Flowers, Moshe Schulman, Jennifer Sodini, and Duff McKagan.
10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
This American Life
The Magic Show
Just a few years before he got the internship at NPR that started him in radio, our host Ira Glass had another career. He performed magic at children's birthday parties. A powerful sense of embarrassment has prevented him from ever doing an episode on the subject, but when he learned that producer David Kestenbaum was also a kid conjurer, they decided to dive in together.
11:00 pm – 12:00 am
Snap Judgment
Beautiful
Lawrence “Binkey” Tolefree gets a phone call about a huge opportunity. But it’s the next call from his mom that leads to the most surprising performance of his career. And Nygel Turner shares what it’s like to live with Gynecomastia (aka Man Boobs).
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