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Morning Edition
Time Running Out for Salt Lake
In Utah, the Great Salt Lake is going dry. That carries potential for environmental disaster. Scientists say it can be avoided. But time's running out.

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2:00 am – 9:00 am
Morning Edition
Time Running Out for Salt Lake
In Utah, the Great Salt Lake is going dry. That carries potential for environmental disaster. Scientists say it can be avoided. But time's running out.
9:00 am – 10:00 am
Forum
KQED’s ‘That’s My Word’ Spotlights Overlooked Bay Area Hip-Hop History
The Bay Area’s outsized contribution to hip-hop has often been overlooked. But this week KQED launched a yearlong project called “That’s My Word,” an exploration into the history and influence of Bay Area hip-hop. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the genre that started in New York and moved west. The Bay Area has played a crucial role as a haven for artists including Mac Dre, Keak Da Sneak, Kamaiyah, Digital Underground, MC Hammer, Too Short and E-40 among many others. We’ll listen to some notable tracks and talk with the project creators about how the Bay Area’s music, vibe and culture gave rise to a distinct blend of hip-hop.
10:00 am – 11:00 am
Forum
The Subversive Power of LGBTQ Comic Books
In 1954, the Comics Code Authority was formed to censor newsstand comic books by banning depictions of violence, negative portrayals of law enforcement and any mention of homosexuality. The ban created the flourishing world of so-called “underground comix,” which approached banned items as a checklist and inspired a generation of LGBTQ cartoonists to draw themselves and their community on the page. A new PBS documentary, “No Straight Lines,” maps the history of LGBTQ comics frame by frame, from Rupert Kinnard’s “Brown Bomber,” to Alison Bechdel’s “Dykes to Watch Out For,” to their influence on the next generation of queer comic artists today. We’ll talk about that history and hear from next generation artists Lawrence Lindell and Maia Kobabe, whose graphic memoir “Gender Queer” is now one of the most-banned books in the U.S.
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Science Friday
‘The Last of Us’
HBO’s new show “The Last of Us” takes viewers to a world taken over by a fungus that turns people into zombies. But when it comes to the fungus, what’s science and what’s fiction? Plus, a look ahead to a new type of nuclear reactor.
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Here & Now
Top Stories, Leaning Into Solitude
The show’s politics roundtable discusses the top stories. Plus, the story of Emily Pennington, who quit her job and set out to visit every single national park in one year. Leaning into the solitude of nature helped her cope with the turmoil of the pandemic, a breakup and loneliness.
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
All Things Considered
Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, the program presents two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.
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