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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Sunday, May 28, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, May 28, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Numbers Whether you love 'em or hate 'em, chances are you rely on numbers every day of your life. Where do they come from, and what do they really do for us? This hour: stories of how numbers confuse us, connect us, and even reveal secrets about us.
  • 1:00 am
    Freakonomics Radio Could Solving This One Problem Solve All the Others? Its hard to break bad habits, let alone create good ones. This week on Freakonomics Radio, an ambitious project wants to help you stop undermining your well-being. Heres a hint: youve got to think small.
  • 2:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Parks and Recreation (Repeat) Imagine spending your winter break butchering caribou at 35 below zero. For some people, wilderness is the ultimate experience. And Americas national parks and refuges make that possible. This week, To the Best of Our Knowledge talks about the complicated history and politics of public wilderness.
  • 3:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Barbecue (Repeat) Summertime food doesnt get more American than barbecue. Its part of our roots. Today, barbecues enjoying a renaissance. In this hour, well meet a legendary pitmaster, visit a Kansas City rib joint, and uncover the secret, not-so-savory history of Americas first food.
  • 4:00 am
    Living On Earth Undue Corporate Influence at UN Climate Rule-Making? The 2017 Climate session in Bonn, Germany was a forum to develop the detailed rules of meeting the commitments made under the Paris agreement in 2015. But another topic surfaced the possible undue influence of industry lobbying groups. To discuss the impact these commercial interest groups have on climate rules, Living on Earth Host Steve Curwood turned to Jesse Bragg, the Media Director for Corporate Accountability International.
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition The Reminders What does it mean to be remembered? Thats the question at the heart of The Reminders, the debut novel from Val Emmich.
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the weeks events.
  • 11:00 am
    A Prairie Home Companion Ben Folds, Brandy Carlile, Ed Helms This week a look back to January 2016 with a rebroadcast of Chris Thile's third turn as the shows guest host, at the Fitzgerald Theater in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Ben Folds joined the program for "Capable of Anything" and "Not a Fan," and teamed up with Chris for "Army"; Ed Helms stopped by as a member of the acting company and tried his hand at a little storytelling; and Brandi Carlile performed "The Eye" and led everyone on "Lovesick Blues" to close out the proceedings.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:30 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Van Jones Van Jones is the President & Co-Founder of Dream Corps. Current initiatives include: #cut50, #YesWeCode, Green For All, and #LoveArmy. These innovative solutions close the prison doors, open the doors of opportunity, into a new green economy. A Yale-educated attorney, Van has written two New York Times Bestsellers: The Green Collar Economy, the definitive book on green jobs, and Rebuild the Dream, a roadmap for progressives. Van is a correspondent for CNN and regular guest on political talk shows. In 2009, Van worked as the green jobs advisor to the Obama White House. There, he helped run the inter-agency process that oversaw $80 billion in green energy recovery spending. Hes in conversation with Jessica Jackson Sloan, National Director of #cut50, a bipartisan initiative to end mass incarceration that she co-founded with Van Jones. Jessica began her career as a human rights attorney representing California death row inmates in their appeals. She became involved in the fight for criminal justice reform after her own family was torn apart by her husbands incarceration.
  • 2:00 pm
    On the Media Rethinking How to Cover Terrorism The press has been in a bind when it comes to covering terrorism: to fully inform the public about terrorist attacks and how they happen, without supplying the very notoriety the attackers crave. Writing in Poynter this week, Indira Lakshmanan argues that whatever the responsible balance is, its not the one that was struck in the coverage of the bombing at the Manchester Arena. Bob speaks with Indira about how wall-to-wall terrorism coverage distorts the truth and traumatizes news consumers, and how journalists can adopt a more accurate lexicon.
  • 3:00 pm
    The New Yorker Radio Hour Jerrod Carmichael, and the Truth About Impeachment As talk of a possible impeachment for President Trump grows more serious, Evan Osnos speaks with an expert about what impeachment really is, and what it takes to pull it off. In his first novel, a journalist imagines our current political divisions leading to all-out civil war. We talk with Jerrod Carmichael, whose comedy is not afraid to acknowledge apathy and ambivalence in the face of hot-button issues of race and politics. And Parker Posey performs a story by Demetri Martin about a summer camper from hell.
  • 4:00 pm
    Says You! The witty word trivia game from member station WGBH in Boston.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Latino USA Immigration Laws and Citizens What happens when immigration laws and policiesintended for immigrantsaffect U.S. citizens? For this episode of Latino USA meet the De La Rosa family, four U.S.-born siblings who are defying the odds and making it work despite being separated from their mother, from 15-year-old Naomi taking on the mom role at home, to Jim, the oldest, joining the military in hopes of getting his mom legal status in the U.S. The program also talks to Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles about how immigration policies can put local governments between a rock and a hard place.
  • 7:00 pm
    Truth, Politics, and Power with Neal Conan Civil War As President Trump expands US involvement in the Middle East, host Neal Conan explores the conflicts in Iraq and Syria in depth. Professor T. David Mason will put Iraq in the context of his ground breaking analysis on how and why civil wars end. Former NPR correspondent Deborah Amos helps us understand the convoluted history of the conflict in Syria; plus author and historian Annette Gordon Reed on the Civil War we know best- our own.
  • 8:00 pm
    KQED Newsroom Health Care, Budget and Foreign Policy Priorities Republicans hoping for good news about the tweaks made to their Obamacare repeal effort that passed in the House of Representatives earlier this month were left disappointed. The Congressional Budget Office estimated the American Health Care Act would leave 23 million fewer Americans with health insurance in the next decade. Low-income and elderly Americans would be the hardest hit. The White House released its full budget proposal for the next fiscal year. Both Republicans and Democrats quickly declared it "dead on arrival" in Congress. The $4.1 trillion spending plan would slash funding for some agencies by as much as 30 percent while national security programs at the Pentagon and Homeland Security would get a nearly $60 billion increase. Low-income Americans would once again bear the brunt of the budget with $600 billion in cuts to Medicaid and nearly one trillion in cuts to assistance programs like food stamps and welfare over the next ten years. And as President Trump was overseas for his first foreign trip, a terror attack in the United Kingdom raised questions about intelligence sharing with American allies that is critical for national security.
  • 8:30 pm
    Check, Please! Bay Area Monkey King Pub, Farmstead, Grand Lake Kitchen Named after the whimsical and mischievous Chinese superhero, Monkey King Pub & Grub offers Asian fusion dishes in Alameda. Then, the local, farm-to-table menu reaches new levels at Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch in St. Helena. Finally, stop by the upscale diner- deli combination at Grand Lake Kitchen in Oakland.
  • 9:00 pm
    Marketplace Weekend The Economy, in Three Cities A special show from three different cities trying to figure out how to make it in this economy. Lizzie OLeary goes to Dalton, Georgia to check in with the towns mayor and see how their economy is faring. Then she head to Gillette, Wyoming, where just about everything depends on coal, and talks with the mayor and people in the town about their lives and economy post-election. Finally Lizzie heads to Corvallis, Oregon to see how this college town is growing its startup industries.
  • 10:00 pm
    TED Radio Hour Wired For Altruism Helping others feels good, but why do some go farther than others? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas about altruism what motivates us to be altruistic, what limits us and do we ever go too far?
  • 11:00 pm
    Tech Nation Underrepresented in Pharmaceutical Testing On this weeks Tech Nation, Moira speaks with Larry Brilliant, physician, technologist and best friend to Wavy Gravy, about helping to eradicate smallpox globally. Hes the author of Sometimes Brilliant The Impossible Adventure of a Spiritual Seeker and Visionary Physician Who Helped Conquer the Worst Disease in History. Then on BioTech Nation, correcting the underrepresentation of Latinos in testing pharmaceuticals and directly addressing the Zika virus in humans. Dr. Kosmas Kretsos, the Executive Director of the Puerto Rico Consortium for Clinical Investigation (PRCCI) describes the efforts underway in Puerto Rico.
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media Rethinking How to Cover Terrorism The press has been in a bind when it comes to covering terrorism: to fully inform the public about terrorist attacks and how they happen, without supplying the very notoriety the attackers crave. Writing in Poynter this week, Indira Lakshmanan argues that whatever the responsible balance is, its not the one that was struck in the coverage of the bombing at the Manchester Arena. Bob speaks with Indira about how wall-to-wall terrorism coverage distorts the truth and traumatizes news consumers, and how journalists can adopt a more accurate lexicon.
Sunday, May 28, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQED-FM, Sat 5/06-Sun 5/07: shift to auxiliary antenna

      KQED-FM is likely to be operating on its auxiliary transmit antenna this Saturday and possibly Sunday as well. There will be workers redoing the tower light wiring on the tower that supports the KQED-FM main antenna. They have asked to begin work at 6AM and work the whole day on Saturday and finish on Sunday […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.