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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, February 24, 2018

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, February 24, 2018
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered NRA Boycott NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Bloomberg reporter Polly Mosendz about why major companies are severing ties with the Nation Rifle Association in the wake of protests over the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people dead.
  • 1:00 am
    KQED Newsroom Student Activists, Gun Control, Mark Farrell, CA Dems Convention Preview In the wake of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, young people have taken up the call for gun control, saying adults have not done enough to end gun violence. We talk to Encinal High School junior Lily Conable and Oakland Tech freshman Maxwell Stern about the walkouts and other political actions theyre planning. Plus, gun control advocates are singling out politicians for their record on guns. We talk to Giffords Executive Director Peter Ambler about a recent ad criticizing Florida Governor Rick Scott for his A-Plus Rating from the NRA. San Francisco Mayor Mark Farrell talks about his plans to tackle homelessness, affordable housing and public safety before voters elect a new mayor in June. And this weekend, Democrats convene one last time before the June primary, with many of them angling for endorsements. There are also some clouds hanging over the party, including the resignation this week of State Senator Tony Mendoza, who stepped down in the wake of sexual harassment allegations. We get a preview from KQEDs Scott Shafer and Katie Orr.
  • 1:30 am
    Washington Week What Happens After Parkland? On this weeks Washington Week: In the aftermath of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, students mobilize to demand action on gun control, President Trump endorses arming teachers, and the NRA hits back at accusations they are to blame for the gun violence plaguing America. A week after a lone gunman shot and killed 17 students and teachers inside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, a wave of walk-outs and demonstrations were staged by students across the country to advocate for stricter gun controls. Survivors of last week's Florida shooting also attended a protest rally at the Florida state capital. The unprecedented action from Americas youth gives gun safety advocates hope last weeks tragic events could lead to legislative action on gun control. In response, President Trump says he supports stricter background checks, banning bump stocks, raising the age to purchase assault rifles from 18 to 21 and potentially arming teachers with guns. He also defended the leadership of the National Rifle Association (NRA).
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club David Frum: The Corruption of American Democracy While much of the country has been focused on the TrumpRussia investigation, conservative author David Frum has been monitoring the strain the new president is placing on the traditional limits of the Oval Office. During his own White House tenure as George W. Bushs speechwriter, Frum witnessed the ways the presidency is limited not by law but by tradition, propriety and public outcry. Frum argues the traditional limits of the Oval Office have been weakened. In his new book, Trumpocracy, Frum outlines how he thinks President Trump could push America toward illiberalism, what the consequences could be for our nation and our everyday lives, and what we can do to prevent it. Join one of Americas leading conservative pundits for a conversation about our changing democracy and where the country is heading.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Erdogan's 'Neat' Solution Turkeys military offensive against Syria's Kurdish-held enclave of Afrin is into its second month. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the operation will allow refugees to be sent back to Syria. Erdogan had been one of the strongest proponents of his country hosting over 3 million Syrian refugees. But that policy is increasingly seen as a political liability. Dorian Jones reports.
  • 4:00 am
    World Affairs The DACA Deadline and Immigration Reform The immigration debate has roared to the front of Washington, D.C. and the countrys agenda. At stake is the fate of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, scheduled to expire on March 5. That issue has been tied to increased border security, a possible wall on our southern border, the family reunification policy and a lower cap on refugee resettlement. As DACA hangs in the balance, what is the future for comprehensive immigration reform? Ali Noorani, executive director of the National Immigration Forum, is in conversation with Ray Suarez, former chief national correspondent for the PBS Newshour.
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition Gun Politics It has been a week of moving public meetings and sharp tweets about gun policies in the aftermath of the Parkland school shooting. Weekend Edition talks about gun regulation and gun politics. Plus, the lastest on the Russia investigation, David Mamets first novel in 20 years, and Patton Oswalt on the book his late wife was writing about a serial killer.
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    The New Yorker Radio Hour An Alternative Oscars Ceremony, and Masha Gessen on Putin's Russia and Trump's America Masha Gessen was born in the Soviet Union and has written extensively about Russian politics. She talks with David Remnick about the similarities between Putins Russia and Trumps America. The New Yorkers Sarah Stillman talks with a former Border Patrol officer, whose years on the job left him emotionally and physically depleted. Richard Brody hosts an alternative Oscars show The Brodies and recommends some of his favorite films from the past year, and the writer Chang-rae Lee takes us to a sprawling international supermarket in Honolulu, Hawaii. And, in a Shouts and Murmurs piece by Seth Reiss, the comedian Bill Hader plays a disgruntled server whos got some strong feelings about the house-made ketchup.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life WaitDo You Have The Map? Stories about people feeling lost and trying to figure out how to move ahead: two brothers take a doomed road trip through Mexico and a couple from radically different backgrounds draw up a contract for their unlikely romance.
  • 1:00 pm
    Snap Judgment Big Girls Don't Cry When the going gets tough, the tough make stuff happen. Featuring stories about rattlesnake pageant queens, Apache orphans, and the legendary Xiao Xiao.
  • 2:00 pm
    Radiolab Mortality This hour of Radiolab: is death a disease that can be cured? The show filters the modern search for the fountain of youth through personal stories of witnessing death -- the death of a cell, the death of a loved one...and the aging of a society.
  • 3:00 pm
    Freakonomics Radio How to Be a Modern Democrat and Win Gina Raimondo, the governor of tiny Rhode Island, has taken on unions, boosted big business, and made friends with Republicans. She is also one of just 15 Democratic governors in the country. This week on Freakonomics Radio, would there be more Democrats in statehouses if they were more like her?
  • 4:00 pm
    Reveal -- From the Center for Investigative Reporting My Town, Chi-Town Since 2000, a quarter-million black Chicagoans have moved away. The reasons include decades of bad policy and broken promises on affordable housing, education and public safety. This week, Reveal takes a close look at these challenges, along with some of the people who are rising to meet them: Reporters from Chicagos Data Reporting Lab investigate officials claims that police tactics have reduced the annual gun homicide count. The Chicago Reporters Kalyn Belsha examines what happened after the city voted in 2013 to shut down 50 public schools. Host Al Letson interviews Natalie Moore, a third-generation Chicagoan and journalist who has written three nonfiction books about the city.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Live From Here with Chris Thile Dr. Dog, Ibeyi, and Dan Naturman After a January spent in relatively balmy climes, we're back in below-freezing Saint Paul for a live broadcast from the Fitzgerald Theater. Dr. Dog are with us and they're bringing new songs vibrating with sounds from '60s pop and '70s rock; Ibeyi join us to get everyone at the Fitz moving and you wont want to miss their magical sibling harmonies; and comic Dan Naturman is on hand (fun fact: he's a member of the New York State Bar Association).
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Illusions: The Stories of Joy Williams Guest host Robert Sean Leonard presents stories by Joy Williams. In "Charity," a good deed turns into a worst-case scenario. The reader is Patricia Kalember. The late David Rakoff performs Williams' Baba Iaga and the Pelican Child, a cautionary tale. And Williams herself reads an excerpt from her story "Escapes," in which a child learns what is magic, and what is not.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life WaitDo You Have The Map? Stories about people feeling lost and trying to figure out how to move ahead: two brothers take a doomed road trip through Mexico and a couple from radically different backgrounds draw up a contract for their unlikely romance.
  • 10:00 pm
    The Moth Radio Hour London Calling with Crossfire, and a Vampire Author Neil Gaiman explains why hes afraid to sing in public, a tourist gets a scare in Londons Highgate Cemetery, a Nigerian man tells a bold truth on live television and Christina Lamb talks about her double life as a mother and a war correspondent.
  • 11:00 pm
    Snap Judgment Big Girls Don't Cry When the going gets tough, the tough make stuff happen. Featuring stories about rattlesnake pageant queens, Apache orphans, and the legendary Xiao Xiao.
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab Mortality This hour of Radiolab: is death a disease that can be cured? The show filters the modern search for the fountain of youth through personal stories of witnessing death -- the death of a cell, the death of a loved one...and the aging of a society.
Saturday, February 24, 2018

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