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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, December 15, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, December 15, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Net Neutrality Vote + History After a brief security evacuation, the Federal Communications Commission voted to undo Obama-era regulations that prohibit cable and telecom companies from blocking access to websites and apps or influencing how fast they load.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Do Liberals Hold the Moral High Ground? Do conservative or liberal philosophies lead to more just outcomes? Opposing moral philosophies have long fueled debate about Americas policy goals and national identity. For conservatives, morality is grounded in ideals such as patriotism, including a respect for order and authority; fairness and liberty in the sense that an individuals actions yield just rewards, or consequences; and reverence for the sanctity of religious and moral tradition. Liberals place moral emphasis on caring: for the poor, the disadvantaged, and the marginalized; on fairness in the sense of redressing both historic wrongs and current inequalities of outcome; and on generosity extending beyond the bounds of nations or cultures. In todays divisive political arena, which side best embodies the nations most cherished virtues? Morally speaking, is the left right?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Training the United States Army Special Forces The United States Army Special Forces are known for their Green Berets and reputation as exceptionally skilled fighters. But an anonymous Green Beret wrote a letter saying a desire for more recruits means strict training standards have been relaxed, increasing risks in the field.
  • MORNING
  • 8:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum FCC Repeals Landmark Obama-Era Net Neutrality Rules The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to repeal net neutrality rules which regulate internet service providers. The Obama Administration rules barred broadband providers from blocking websites or charging for certain content or services. The Republican-led commission voted along party lines in the face of widespread protest and criticism. We'll talk about what the repeal could mean for consumers and technology companies.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum From Bean to Bar: Making Chocolate at Home Nestled in San Francisco's Mission District is Dandelion Chocolate, a small batch chocolate factory started by a couple of friends with a passion for the craft. Now, they're bringing their bean-to-bar ethos to the home cook. Their new cookbook describes the process of sourcing, roasting, and grinding your own beans AND features a few recipes for what to do with the chocolate once you're done. We'll dive into the world of home chocolate making and taste the fruits of Dandelion's labor.
  • 10:30 am
    Forum 'The Stoop' Explores African Identity in America Hana Baba and Leila Day are journalists in the Bay Area who often found themselves in the newsroom chatting about their black identities: Baba is Sudanese American and Day is African American. They've turned those conversations into a podcast called "The Stoop," which explores the discussions black people have about what "it means to be black, and how we talk about blackness." Baba and Day join us to discuss their project and the conversations that spurred it: everything from being told they "sound white" to whether wearing traditional African prints constitutes style or cultural appropriation.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Future Transit Is the future of driving destined to be green? How electric vehicles challenge the grid, and why autonomous cars could reduce emissions. Plus why the big tech giants still use tape to backup their servers. And the darker side of LED lighting.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Fire & Development As the Thomas Fire still rages in California, Science Friday takes a look ahead, at how human development and climate change will shape wildfire in the years to come. Plus an update on the state of aging research. Are we still looking for some sort of fountain of youth? Or is a way to live healthier--for longer--now the goal?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Post The new film The Post, starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks is about how Washington Post publisher Katherine Graham and executive editor Ben Bradlee defied a federal judge by publishing the Pentagon Papers. They risked going to jail and the ruin of the paper. First hear Terrys 1997 interview with former "Washington Post" publisher Katherine Graham. She died in 2001. Graham's father owned "the Post" in 1933 and later her husband, Phil Graham, took over. Following her husband's suicide in 1963, Graham became publisher, knowing little about the managerial or journalistic aspects of the job. But, learning while she worked, she transformed the paper into one of the country's most respected newspapers. "The Post" broke the Watergate scandal and published the Pentagon Papers against a federal judge's ruling. Graham also became chairman and CEO of the Washington Post Media company. She wrote about her childhood and experiences as publisher in the autobiography "Personal History." Then listen to Terrys 1995 interview with Former Executive Editor of The Washington Post Ben Bradlee. He died in 2014. During his stint at the paper he helped transform the Post into one of the most influential investigative newspapers. Under his leadership, reporters investigated and broke open the Watergate story. The paper also challenged the federal government over the right to publish the Pentagon Papers. Bradlee wrote his autobiography: Ben Bradlee: A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Who Said That? You know computers can sound like real people. But did you know that they can sound just like you? And the technology is already here, for an authentic copy of you to say things that you have never said.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The End of AIM If you grew up in the 80s and 90s you probably remember AOL instant messenger. But the service is shutting down and some are shedding a tear emoji.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report Burrito Empire In the latest installment of our Family Biz series, hear about a family that fled Pancho Villas army in Mexico a century ago, and has created a frozen burrito empire in California. Lisa Morehouse, of California Foodways, reports from the Central Valley farm town of Dinuba, where Ruiz Foods is headquartered. Their burritos can be found in school cafeterias, convenience stores, and family freezers across the nation. And our #UsToo series continues with a moving first-person reflection from another respondent to our survey about sexual harassment. Georgia Browne, from the Bay Area city of Fremont, shares her story about how the Jehovahs Witness church ignored, and then ex-communicated her after she reported being raped by a fellow church member. Those stories and more on this weeks show.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report Burrito Empire In the latest installment of our Family Biz series, hear about a family that fled Pancho Villas army in Mexico a century ago, and has created a frozen burrito empire in California. Lisa Morehouse, of California Foodways, reports from the Central Valley farm town of Dinuba, where Ruiz Foods is headquartered. Their burritos can be found in school cafeterias, convenience stores, and family freezers across the nation. And our #UsToo series continues with a moving first-person reflection from another respondent to our survey about sexual harassment. Georgia Browne, from the Bay Area city of Fremont, shares her story about how the Jehovahs Witness church ignored, and then ex-communicated her after she reported being raped by a fellow church member. Those stories and more on this weeks show.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Post The new film The Post, starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks is about how Washington Post publisher Katherine Graham and executive editor Ben Bradlee defied a federal judge by publishing the Pentagon Papers. They risked going to jail and the ruin of the paper. First hear Terrys 1997 interview with former "Washington Post" publisher Katherine Graham. She died in 2001. Graham's father owned "the Post" in 1933 and later her husband, Phil Graham, took over. Following her husband's suicide in 1963, Graham became publisher, knowing little about the managerial or journalistic aspects of the job. But, learning while she worked, she transformed the paper into one of the country's most respected newspapers. "The Post" broke the Watergate scandal and published the Pentagon Papers against a federal judge's ruling. Graham also became chairman and CEO of the Washington Post Media company. She wrote about her childhood and experiences as publisher in the autobiography "Personal History." Then listen to Terrys 1995 interview with Former Executive Editor of The Washington Post Ben Bradlee. He died in 2014. During his stint at the paper he helped transform the Post into one of the most influential investigative newspapers. Under his leadership, reporters investigated and broke open the Watergate story. The paper also challenged the federal government over the right to publish the Pentagon Papers. Bradlee wrote his autobiography: Ben Bradlee: A Good Life: Newspapering and Other Adventures.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Americas Role on the World Stage: A Conversation With NBC News and MSNBC The national security experts and intelligence contributors of NBC News join Andrea Mitchell, NBC News chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of MSNBCs Andrea Mitchell Reports, for a panel discussion on the United States role on the global stage and its position as a world leader in diplomatic scenarios.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report Burrito Empire In the latest installment of our Family Biz series, hear about a family that fled Pancho Villas army in Mexico a century ago, and has created a frozen burrito empire in California. Lisa Morehouse, of California Foodways, reports from the Central Valley farm town of Dinuba, where Ruiz Foods is headquartered. Their burritos can be found in school cafeterias, convenience stores, and family freezers across the nation. And our #UsToo series continues with a moving first-person reflection from another respondent to our survey about sexual harassment. Georgia Browne, from the Bay Area city of Fremont, shares her story about how the Jehovahs Witness church ignored, and then ex-communicated her after she reported being raped by a fellow church member. Those stories and more on this weeks show.
  • 11:30 pm
  • 12:00 am
Friday, December 15, 2017

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