Marketplace
Marketplace

Our flagship program, helmed by Kai Ryssdal, examines what the day in money delivered, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. Updated Monday through Friday at about 3:30 p.m. PT.

Airs on:
MON-FRI 4pm-4:30pm, MON-WED 6:30pm-7pm
28 min

Millions could face eviction with the moratorium ending

More than 15 million people live in households that are behind on their rent, according to a new report from the Aspen Institute. And while Congress allocated $46 billion in federal assistance for renters during the pandemic, access to technology, language barriers and lack of information are proving to be hurdles for tenants behind on their rents. Also on today’s show: How London’s financial center is faring after Brexit, hints at a potential American hunger crisis and a resurgence in Alaska’s salmon industry.
28 min

Wall Street’s Sallie Krawcheck on the pandemic and the gender wealth gap

Sallie Krawcheck, CEO and co-founder of Ellevest, a digital financial company for women, discusses how COVID-19 exacerbated existing inequities between men and women. She also talks about why money causes stress and the future of her company. Also on today’s show: the continuing struggles of the travel industry, shifting language in home appraisals and what washing machine sales can teach us about consumer confidence.
28 min

Why some towns might pay you to move there

Towns like Augusta, Maine; Bemidji, Minnesota; and Savannah, Georgia, are among the more than 40 communities in the U.S. incentivizing people to move there. They dangle perks like housing assistance, camping equipment or up to $20,000 in cash. The incentives are aimed at convincing remote workers to make a move, which can boost the economies of struggling locales. Also on the show: shipping bottlenecks in Chicago, the good some economists think inflation can bring and engineering restaurant menus for a QR code-friendly world.
28 min

Businesses are reopening across the U.S., especially where vaccine rates are higher

Over 60,000 businesses reopened during the second quarter, which is the highest volume of reopenings in the last year, according to data from Yelp. But there’s a distinct correlation between consumer interest and vaccination rates, meaning more Yelp searches, pictures and reviews for places like Maine, Vermont, Connecticut and New York than Arizona, Alabama and Mississippi. Also on the show: when masks are on the back-to-school shopping list, one chocolate store’s hiring struggles and why parking spots may continue to be hard to find.
28 min

When fast-fashion becomes real-time fashion

Though it may not be instantaneous, China-based online clothing brand Shein makes it pretty darn close. They’ve cut the clothing design and production process down to as little as a few days. In today’s show, we talk about one of the fastest-growing e-commerce companies in the world revolutionizing fashion and apparel. But first: rental bidding wars, California’s power-sharing predicament and why we believe economists’ predictions when they seem to get it oh-so-wrong.
27 min

Shanghai’s newsstands are disappearing. Why?

Red news booths used to dot Shanghai’s cityscape. Now, finding a newspaper in China’s financial capital is a difficult task. Newspaper circulation in China dropped by 37% between 2010 and 2019, according to government statistics. So, what does that mean for the few remaining newsstands that some say have outlived their use? Also on the show today: environmental justice guidance from the White House, hopes for Broadway’s reopening and fewer financial aid applicants.
28 min

The pandemic recession … is over?

The recent pandemic-induced recession only lasted only two months and ended in April 2020, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Business Cycle Dating Committee. On today’s show, we’ll dig into why that is and why it feels like the recession is far from over for some Americans. Then, how manufacturers and retailers sneakily hide the fact that food prices are going up. Plus, what equitable infrastructure looks like for communities of color, low maintenance costs for electric vehicles and selling homemade bread straight from Grandma’s recipe box.
28 min

Teens to the (job market) rescue

The number of 16- to 19-year-olds who work jumped to nearly 32% in June, meaning teens are helping ease the economy’s worker shortage. On today’s show, we’ll hear from two teenagers about what they’re doing to earn money. Plus, the European Union’s controversial carbon tariff, the red-hot homebuilding market and the Biden administration plays a cyberattack blame game.