Here & Now
Here & Now

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it's happening in the middle of the day, with timely, in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson and Tonya Mosley.

Airs on:
MON-THU 11am-12pm
41 min

Presidents Saying Farewell; Netflix's 'The Trial Of The Chicago 7'

Trump will not deliver a high-profile, televised farewell address as some past presidents have done. Here & Now's Alex Ashlock has a report on how past presidents have said goodbye. And, Frank Langella stars as Judge Julius Hoffman in the Netflix film "The Trial of the Chicago 7." He talks about how the story resonates today.
41 min

Save Our Stages; D.C. Hotels And Inauguration Day

Ahead of Inauguration Day, some hotels are choosing to stay open despite increased security and calls by local leaders for visitors to avoid the area due to threats of violence. We speak with the owner of Adam's Inn on his decision to remain open this week. Also, the Save our Stages Act — $15 billion tied into the larger COVID-19 relief bill — is a lifeline for struggling independent venues across the U.S. We talk to two venue owners in Chicago about what the act means to them.
42 min

COVID-19 Apps; Ruby Bridges Reflects On Martin Luther King Jr.

As a child, Ruby Bridges was the first Black student to desegregate an elementary school in New Orleans. She joins us to remember and honor the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. on this special day. And, a variety of new smartphone apps are being developed to help Americans navigate the pandemic. We hear about two of them.
42 min

How The Capitol Mob Compares To Black Lives Matter; Actor Wendell Pierce

Some on the right have compared the violence of the insurrection to last year's Black Lives Matter protests. Historian Ashley Howard explains why the comparison doesn't hold up to reality. And, "The Wire" star Wendell Pierce talks about the role of art in advancing social progress.
42 min

West Virginia's Successful Vaccine Efforts; Trump Voters Remain Loyal

Over the past few weeks, West Virginia has been hosting vaccination events and now leads the nation in distributing vaccines. Retired Major General James Hoyer discusses vaccine plans in the state. Also, pollster Frank Luntz found 91% of 800 people who voted for Trump in November said they would vote for him again. He shares more of his findings.
42 min

Apaches Sue To Protect Holy Site; COVID-19 And Down Syndrome

In Arizona, Resolution Copper wants to mine the copper underneath Oak Flat, which would destroy an area that's sacred to the Apache Tribe. The grassroots organization Apache Stronghold has filed a lawsuit. The Arizona Republic reporter Debra Utacia Krol talks about the contentious deal. And, the CDC is recommending individuals with Down Syndrome get vaccinated early. We look at the link between Down Syndrome and increased COVID-19 risk.
42 min

Pro Baseball's 1st Black Woman Coach; Story Behind The Hijab Emoji

Bianca Smith was hired last week as a coach for the Red Sox minor league system in Florida. She's the first Black woman hired as a coach in professional baseball, an industry that has been expanding roles for women. And, we speak with Rayouf Alhumedhi about her campaign for a hijab emoji, which is featured in the documentary "The Emoji Story."
41 min

Prisons Virus Outbreaks; WHO Investigates Origins Of COVID-19

Christopher Blackwell is incarcerated in Washington state where he's been on lockdown after a severe COVID-19 outbreak. He speaks about the conditions and his call for incarcerated people to get the vaccine early. Also, a team of experts from the World Health Organization has arrived in Wuhan, China, to begin an investigation into the origins of the coronavirus. Dr. Peter Ben Embarek, who's part of the team, joins us.