Here & Now
Here & Now

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it's happening in the middle of the day, with timely, in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson and Tonya Mosley.

Airs on:
MON-THU 11am-12pm
41 min

Disarming domestic abusers; Business booms in 'Joblessville, USA'

In the U.S., felons and those convicted of domestic violence crimes are not allowed to own or have guns. But an investigation found at least 100 cases of homicides by partners that were not legally supposed to have a firearm. Reveal reporter Jennifer Gollan joins us to discuss. And, Rod Roberson, mayor of Elkhart, Indiana, talks about how the self-proclaimed "RV capital of the world" went from "Joblessville, USA" a decade ago to topping a recent list of emerging housing markets.
41 min

Pumpkin recipes to spice up spooky season; 'A Shot To Save the World'

Pumpkin can be used for so much more than pie. Resident chef Kathy Gunst shares three new recipes using pumpkin. And, there wasn't a COVID-19 vaccine this time last year. Wall Street Journal reporter Gregory Zuckerman talks about his new book "A Shot to Save the World: The Inside Story of the Life-or-Death Race for a Covid-19 Vaccine."
41 min

Shad on 'Black Averageness'; Controversy over author's true identity

Canadian rapper Shad talks about his single "Black Averageness" and his new album "Tao." And, it was revealed that Spanish writer Carmen Mola is not a woman but rather three men. María Ramírez, deputy managing editor of the Spanish news outlet elDiario.es, tells us more.
40 min

Howard University students protest; Analysts say Chinese jet was built on espionage

Howard University senior Erica England explains why students are protesting at one of the most prestigious historically Black colleges and universities in the country. And, analysts say the Chinese-made C919 jet is another example of China's industrial espionage. Adam Meyers, senior vice president of intelligence at cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike, talks about the plane's history.
41 min

TikTok star Noodle the pug; 'Swamp Show' inspired by artist Thomas Cole

Noodle is a 13-year-old pug who — like many of us — loves sleeping. He is also TikTok's newest meme and obsession. We hear from his owner, Jonathan Graziano, about "bones" and "no bones" days. And, along the Connecticut River in Massachusetts, works of art were hung from trees, floated on water or partially submerged. The recent show was inspired by a painting of a bend in the river by 19th-century artist Thomas Cole. Jill Kaufman of New England Public Media has the story.
40 min

How China spreads misinformation around the world; A look at 'The Facebook Papers'

Bret Schafer, a senior fellow at the Alliance for Securing Democracy, explains how China is able to spread misinformation around the world by taking advantage of the way search engines find and list content. And, there are more damaging revelations swirling about Facebook as new reporting has come to light based on information from whistleblower Frances Haugen. Sara Fischer, a media reporter at Axios, has the latest.
41 min

Slim pickings for the flower industry; The fate of women's rights in Afghanistan

The Los Angeles Flower District is the largest wholesale flower market in the U.S. But lately, the pickings have been slim. Like many industries, the flower market is facing a shortage. The CEO of the Society of American Florists joins us. And, since the Taliban took power from the Afghan government, there has been immense uncertainty for women in the country. Heather Barr of Human Rights Watch discusses the future of women's rights in the country.
41 min

COVID-19 and an eviction nearly unravel one family; The digital footprint of trauma

A single mother was evicted from her home in July after she contracted COVID-19 and was unable to work. Host Peter O'Dowd visits Shuntera Brown in Phoenix to learn how both events unraveled her family's life. And, when traumatic moments happen, Big Tech algorithms remember them and remind us of them online. Wired writer Lauren Goode discusses the digital footprint of trauma.