Here & Now
Here & Now

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it's happening in the middle of the day, with timely, in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson and Tonya Mosley.

Airs on:
MON-THU 11am-12pm
43 min

Jackson Browne's 'Downhill From Everywhere'; Fox News, GOP On Vaccines

We speak with Rock & Roll Hall of Fame musician Jackson Browne, whose new album "Downhill From Everywhere" drops Friday. And, Fox News premiered a PSA this week encouraging viewers to get vaccinated. The network still features hosts skeptical of the vaccine. The news comes as some GOP lawmakers have also started to encourage vaccination. NPR's David Folkenflik reports.
42 min

Black Lives Matter Marks 8 Years; Losing Everything In A Disaster

July marks the eighth anniversary of Black Lives Matter. Melina Abdullah, co-founder of Los Angeles' Black Lives Matter chapter, joins us. And, whether it's a wildfire or a condo collapse, a disaster services attorney and a survivor of the 2018 Camp Fire outline how to heal — physically and mentally — from such a sudden uprooting.
42 min

How Unarmed Crisis Teams Save Lives; School Supplies Shortage

Unarmed crisis teams respond to suicide threats, substance abuse calls, welfare checks and other moments where a counselor — instead of a police officer — can de-escalate a situation. We check in with the country's first such crisis response program known as CAHOOTS. And, for many kids, going back to school means shopping for new supplies. But a number of challenges this year have left retailers struggling to stock the shelves. MSNBC's Ali Velshi explains.
42 min

One Salvadoran Migrant's Journey Toward Asylum; History Of Cuba

Washington Post reporter Arelis R. Hernández has been following one Salvadoran woman who had been seeking asylum in the U.S. for more than a year. She shares Nancy's journey. And, Cuba is going through its largest protests against the government in half a decade. Professor Michael Bustamante gives us a primer on Cuban history from its time as a Spanish colony to the present.
41 min

Climate Change Amps Up Extreme Weather; U.S. Women's Soccer Team Loses

Over the past few weeks, deadly flooding rocked Germany and a blistering heat wave struck the American West. Professor Friederike Otto discusses climate change and extreme weather events. And, Sweden beat the U.S. women's soccer team in Tokyo on Wednesday. The U.S. team has a chance to recover with two upcoming games. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us with more.
42 min

A Paperclip For A House: The Trade-Up Economy; Milwaukee Bucks Win Big

A decade ago, Kyle MacDonald exchanged a paper clip for something a little more valuable, and so on and so on, until he had a home. His success went viral and inspired a fad, which gained traction during the pandemic. We talk to two college graduates with student loan debt who gave the trade-up fad a shot. And, the Milwaukee Bucks won the NBA Finals, beating out the Phoenix Suns. A. Sherrod Blakely, an NBA commentator, joins us to wrap up the season.
42 min

Canada's Indigenous Residential Schools; COVID-19 Concerns At Olympics

More unmarked graves have been unearthed at a former Indigenous residential school site in Canada. The graves are believed to contain remains of Indigenous children forcibly taken from their families from the late 1880s to the 1990s. We talk with Assembly of First Nations National Chief RoseAnne Archibald. And, there have been a number of COVID-19 cases among athletes, team officials and others who've arrived in Tokyo for the Olympics. NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports from Japan.
43 min

'Subpar Parks' Turns Bad Reviews Into Art; 'Vesper Flights' Essays

Illustrator Amber Share talks about her new book "Subpar Parks: America's Most Extraordinary Parks and Their Least Impressed Visitors." She pairs one-star reviews of national parks with her illustrations. And, author and naturalist Helen Macdonald talks about her essay collection "Vesper Flights."