Here & Now
Here & Now

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it's happening in the middle of the day, with timely, in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson and Tonya Mosley.

Airs on:
MON-THU 11am-12pm
41 min

Heat Disparities In Poor, Latino Neighborhoods; Republican Vaccine Hesitancy

A recent study shows that poor and Latino neighborhoods in the Southwestern U.S. are hotter than wealthier, whiter neighborhoods in the same cities. The study's lead author joins us. And, a new survey explores why some conservative voters are growing even more skeptical about getting COVID-19 vaccines. Republican pollster Frank Luntz talks about his findings.
41 min

Justin Bieber's Redemption; Implicit Bias Training For Police

Justin Bieber's accelerated rise to success as a child star brought him years of pain — but he's figured out a way to piece his life together again. GQ's Zach Baron explains the significance of the singer's evolution. And, many police departments have implemented implicit bias training for officers. Social psychologist Jack Glaser joins us.
41 min

Twin City Teens On Chauvin Verdict; Greening The Internet

High school students I'sis Brown in Minneapolis and Jerome Treadwell in St. Paul reflect on the murder trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin and the guilty verdict that followed. And, modern internet relies on cables at the bottom of the ocean. As WLRN's Danny Rivero reports, researchers are now studying how that sprawling cable network could impact climate change.
41 min

Healing After Chauvin Murder Conviction; Police Reaction To Verdict

There's lingering grief in Minneapolis for all those who died at the hands of police before and after George Floyd, including Philando Castile and Daunte Wright. Racial trauma therapist Resmaa Menakem discusses healing and moving forward. And, criminal justice professor and police consultant Lorenzo Boyd, who says Derek Chauvin "set policing back a decade," joins us.
40 min

Minimize Food Waste; New Mexico's Vaccination Success Story

Chef Kathy Gunst shares tips for reducing food waste and making better use of ingredients that most of us routinely throw away. And, 56% of people over 16 in New Mexico so far have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose. The state's secretary of health explains how they are reaching as many people as possible.
41 min

'Driving While Brown'; Melting Thwaites Glacier

Joe Arpaio's hard-line immigration enforcement in Arizona's Maricopa County sparked a fierce Latino-led resistance movement determined to bring him down. Jude Joffe-Block discusses her new book on Arpaio's downfall, "Driving While Brown." And, one of the largest glaciers in Antarctica is melting faster than previously known. Researcher Rob Larter discusses the fate of the Thwaites Glacier.
42 min

Cities Reimagine Police Traffic Stops; 'Citizen Kane' History

Studies show that police traffic stops disproportionately affect communities of color, but many in law enforcement maintain the argument that the stops help keep their communities safe. NPR's Eric Westervelt details the latest reform efforts. And, Oscar-nominated film "Mank" is about the writing of the screenplay for the 1941 classic "Citizen Kane." We take a look at the movie's history.
42 min

Ayanna Pressley On Punishing Black Girls In Schools; Gas Cooking

Black girls are suspended six to seven times more than white girls in schools across the U.S. Now, Rep. Ayanna Pressley is reintroducing a bill that aims to disrupt the school-to-confinement pipeline. And, 6 million businesses in the U.S. rely on gas. Carbon expert Mike Henchen and chef Nick Cobarruvias talk about the future of gas in the restaurant industry.