Supervisor, District 3

Board of Supervisors, District 3

Candidate with majority vote wins seat. If no candidate reaches majority, top two candidates advance to runoff in general election.

Chris Coursey(incumbent)69.5%
11,346 votes
Omar Medina30.4%
4,966 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Why does this race matter? 

Sonoma County’s 3rd District encompasses central Santa Rosa and most of Rohnert Park. Its population is the youngest of the county’s five districts, and has the lowest median household income. Former Santa Rosa Mayor Coursey was elected to the office in 2020.

What does a county supervisor do? 

Supervisors govern county programs and departments and approve the county budget. Their largest area of spending is traditionally health care and human services. Supervisors are also responsible for local jails and elections, and they make decisions on law enforcement and housing in unincorporated areas of the county. If a supervisor candidate receives over 50% of the vote in the primary, they take office for a four-year term. Otherwise, the top two candidates face off in the November general election.

Candidates

Chris Coursey
Chris CourseySupervisor, Sonoma County
Omar Medina
Omar Medina President, Santa Rosa City Schools Board

Key Supporters

This list represents notable organizations and individuals who have taken a position on the ballot measure or candidate, or who are funding campaigns in support or opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

For Coursey

  • Bill Dodd, state senator
  • Jared Huffman, U.S. representative
  • Natalie Rogers, mayor, Santa Rosa 
  • Eddie Alvarez, City Council member, Santa Rosa 
  • North Bay Labor Council

For Medina

  • Latino PAC of Sonoma County
  • Eddie Alvarez, City Council member, Santa Rosa 
  • Mariana Martinez, SRJC Trustee
 

Positions on Key Issues
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, questionnaires, statements made at debates and public events, and past news coverage.

Sonoma County has a homeless problem that’s more visible than ever — on underpasses, in RV and tent encampments, and in public trails and parks. How can we meaningfully help the unhoused population, rather than just sweeping them out of public view?

Coursey says that while “the problem appears to be much greater than it used to be,” he cites counts showing that homeless population numbers are down “significantly” since he became supervisor. Serving on the county’s Continuum of Care board, he has helped set policy and manage funding for homeless services, pointing to the county's mental health contributions to the recently opened Caritas Village drop-in center, operated by Catholic Charities.
Medina wants to think beyond a model of collaborating with nonprofits, and reexamine the effectiveness of current spending on “services to maintain the existing homeless population, versus housing solutions that are not these big developer projects.” He says mental health services are needed, and believes a county-run facility with individual living units could be more successful and cost-effective than group shelters.

Rent protections enacted after the 2017 fires have expired, and the median income of the district lags well behind its median rent. How would you promote more affordable housing so that the lower-wage workers who keep the district running can continue to live here?

Coursey says affordable housing has been his “top priority” since being elected to Santa Rosa’s city council, where he supported a rent control ordinance ultimately overturned by voters. He recently introduced a just cause eviction ordinance to the Board of Supervisors, which during his term has strengthened rent control for mobile homes. Coursey touted the Roseland Village project, which includes 75 affordable units in the largely Latino region of the 3rd District.
Medina says that most affordable housing isn’t affordable to the average worker. He says it’s common for multiple families to share a house, and, on the school board, he’s seen its detriments to young people’s mental health. He would promote a county-run program, possibly administered by the Community Development Commission, in which “a portion of [one’s] rent is going into some sort of savings account for them to later be able to move on to homeownership.”

Over 30% of the district's population is Hispanic, and growing every year. How will you ensure inclusion and a seat at the table for the district's Hispanic and Latino residents?

Coursey points to his appointments to county boards and commissions, saying that “the group of people that I've appointed has a high proportion of Latinos and people of color, and more than 50% are women.” Coursey says, “I don't think that you have to speak Spanish to do this job.” Bilingual members of his staff from Roseland, he says, “help me navigate that divide.”
Medina is the son of immigrants, and grew up in the district’s predominantly Latino neighborhood, attending Lawrence Cook Junior High (now Lawrence Cook Middle School) and Elsie Allen High School. “Me being bilingual, and bicultural — that doesn't exist on the board at the moment,” he says. Someone from the area and culture, like himself, “would be able to go to the community as a supervisor to connect and to listen, in a way that feels much more connected and engaging.

What meaningful action can be taken to address the climate crisis at the county level?

Coursey, an avid cyclist, says that the county needs to deal with its “number of tailpipes.” He points to his work on the SMART Sonoma–Marin Area Rail Transit district as an example of his commitment to reduce the county’s greenhouse gasses. As supervisor, he has helped approve free bus rides for youth and seniors, and worked to make large buildings such as the Santa Rosa Veterans Building more energy efficient.
Medina says that there are not enough bus routes, and that public transportation needs to be strengthened and better promoted, especially to young people. Talking to parents as a school board member, he says, “there’s a lot of fear right now about having your children ride public transportation.” He adds that equipping more homes with solar panels and other efficiency upgrades “could really decrease these bills that a lot of people are facing now.”

Where do you stand on police accountability and funding?

Coursey says, “I believe in robust oversight of law enforcement.” He supported Measure P, which strengthened IOLERO, the county’s oversight program, and says that methods for repairing eroded trust in law enforcement must be “not just a public relations repair, but actual transparency and trust.” In the time since joining the board, which approves the sheriff’s annual budget, he says the board has “not had conversations about reducing the sheriff's budget.”
Medina has been a school board member during a spate of campus violence, including a fatal stabbing in the district which resulted in calls to reinstate police presence at schools. He voted against it: “In general I'm not supportive of having officers in our schools,” he says, adding that it harms students of color in particular. He is “a strong advocate of police accountability programs.”

More Sonoma County Results

U.S. House of Representatives, District 2

Top two candidates advance to general election.

Jared Huffman (D)(incumbent)73.6%
169,005 votes
Chris Coulombe (R)16.2%
37,372 votes
Tief Gibbs (R)8%
18,437 votes

Race called at 5:46 PM PT on March 11, 2024
98.93% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

U.S. House of Representatives, District 4

Top two candidates advance to general election.

Mike Thompson (D)(incumbent)62.9%
118,147 votes
John Munn (R)29.9%
56,232 votes
Andrew Engdahl (D)5.9%
11,202 votes

Race called at 4:30 PM PT on March 6, 2024
97.16% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Senate, District 3

Top two candidates advance to general election.

Thom Bogue (R)27.8%
61,776 votes
Christopher Cabaldon (D)26.5%
59,041 votes
Rozzana Verder-Aliga (D)20.4%
45,546 votes

Race called at 6:24 PM PT on March 14, 2024
100% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 2

Top two candidates advance to general election.

Michael Greer (R)27.3%
38,079 votes
Chris Rogers (D)19.5%
27,126 votes
Rusty Hicks (D)18.4%
25,615 votes

Race called at 2:38 PM PT on March 22, 2024
100% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 4

Top two candidates advance to general election.

Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D)(incumbent)
Race called at 8:00 PM PT on March 5, 2024
Associated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 12

Top two candidates advance to general election.

Damon Connolly (D)(incumbent)77.5%
111,275 votes
Andy Podshadley (R)12%
17,240 votes
Eryn Cervantes (R)10.4%
15,017 votes
Race called at 5:25 PM PT on March 20, 2024
100% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

Superior Court Judge, Office 3

Candidate with majority vote wins seat. If no candidate reaches majority, top two candidates advance to runoff in general election.

Kristine M. Burk68.8%
79,498 votes
Beki Berrey31.1%
35,907 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Superior Court Judge, Office 4

Candidate with majority vote wins seat. If no candidate reaches majority, top two candidates advance to runoff in general election.

Paul J. Lozada100%
86,789 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Superior Court Judge, Office 6

Candidate with majority vote wins seat. If no candidate reaches majority, top two candidates advance to runoff in general election.

Kenneth English64.2%
75,754 votes
Omar Figueroa35.7%
42,236 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Board of Supervisors, District 1

Candidate with majority vote wins seat. If no candidate reaches majority, top two candidates advance to runoff in general election.

Rebecca Hermosillo78.9%
23,958 votes
Jonathan Mathieu21%
6,390 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Board of Supervisors, District 3

Candidate with majority vote wins seat. If no candidate reaches majority, top two candidates advance to runoff in general election.

Chris Coursey(incumbent)69.5%
11,346 votes
Omar Medina30.4%
4,966 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Board of Supervisors, District 5

Candidate with majority vote wins seat. If no candidate reaches majority, top two candidates advance to runoff in general election.

Lynda Hopkins(incumbent)100%
23,356 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Measure A

Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District. Parcel tax. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes75%
10,320 votes
No24.9%
3,436 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Measure B

Petaluma Joint Union High School District. Parcel tax. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes63.4%
15,795 votes
No36.5%
9,082 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Measure C

Fort Ross School District. School bond. Passes with 55% vote.

Yes55.5%
159 votes
No44.4%
127 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Measure D

Harmony Union School District. School bond. Passes with 55% vote.

Yes56.5%
1,089 votes
No43.4%
836 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Measure E

Petaluma City (Elementary) School District. Parcel tax. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes68.4%
7,622 votes
No31.5%
3,511 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Measure G

Rincon Valley Union School District. School bond. Passes with 55% vote.

Yes59.4%
8,668 votes
No40.5%
5,909 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County

Measure H

Sonoma County. Sales tax. Passes with majority vote.

Yes61.7%
89,646 votes
No38.2%
55,615 votes
Updated at 6:51 PM PT on March 29, 2024
Sonoma County