Alameda County

Elections in Albany, Berkeley, Oakland and San Leandro use a ranked choice voting system. If no candidate receives a majority of the votes, an instant runoff takes place. Here's how that works. Results on this page show first-place votes, with links to the latest instant runoff results.

Alameda County District Attorney

Top candidate wins seat.

Pamela Price53.1%
228,721 votes
Terry Wiley46.8%
201,676 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland Mayor

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Loren Manuel Taylor33%
41,468 votes
Sheng Thao31.7%
39,872 votes
Ignacio De La Fuente10.2%
12,884 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure V

Oakland. Just cause evictions. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes68.3%
84,685 votes
No31.6%
39,292 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

U.S. House of Representatives, District 10

Top candidate wins seat.

Mark DeSaulnier (D)(incumbent)78.9%
198,407 votes
Michael Kerr (Grn)21%
52,960 votes
Race called at 10:50 PM PT on November 8, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

U.S. House of Representatives, District 12

Top candidate wins seat.

Barbara Lee (D)(incumbent)90.4%
216,913 votes
Stephen Slauson (R)9.5%
22,831 votes
Race called at 8:53 PM PT on November 8, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

U.S. House of Representatives, District 14

Top candidate wins seat.

Eric Swalwell (D)(incumbent)69.3%
137,491 votes
Alison Hayden (R)30.6%
60,803 votes
Race called at 9:27 PM PT on November 8, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

U.S. House of Representatives, District 17

Top candidate wins seat.

Ro Khanna (D)(incumbent)70.9%
127,757 votes
Ritesh Tandon (R)29%
52,349 votes
Race called at 9:01 PM PT on November 8, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Senate, District 10

Top candidate wins seat.

Aisha Wahab (D)53.7%
114,887 votes
Lily Mei (D)46.2%
98,933 votes
Race called at 4:43 PM PT on November 21, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 14

Top candidate wins seat.

Buffy Wicks (D)(incumbent)88.4%
139,274 votes
Rich Kinney (R)11.5%
18,229 votes
Race called at 9:56 PM PT on November 8, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 16

Top candidate wins seat.

Rebecca Bauer-Kahan (D)(incumbent)65.7%
130,775 votes
Joseph Rubay (R)34.2%
68,130 votes
Race called at 7:44 PM PT on November 10, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 18

Top candidate wins seat.

Mia Bonta (D)(incumbent)89.9%
120,747 votes
Mindy Pechenuk (R)10%
13,491 votes
Race called at 12:22 PM PT on November 9, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 20

Top candidate wins seat.

Liz Ortega (D)62.1%
68,775 votes
Shawn Kumagai (D)37.8%
41,889 votes
Race called at 6:48 PM PT on November 17, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 24

Top candidate wins seat.

Alex Lee (D)(incumbent)69%
75,163 votes
Bob Brunton (R)30.9%
33,629 votes
Race called at 4:43 PM PT on November 12, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

Measure D

Alameda County. Agricultural buildings. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes69.7%
297,768 votes
No30.2%
129,375 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure E

Alameda. Council pay. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes53.9%
15,267 votes
No46%
13,021 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure F

Alameda. Transient occupancy tax. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes59.3%
16,933 votes
No40.6%
11,620 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure G

Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District. School bond. Passes with 55% vote.

Yes50.1%
17,021 votes
No49.8%
16,948 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure H

Oakland Unified School District. Parcel tax. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes81.6%
102,649 votes
No18.3%
23,126 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure I

Pleasanton Unified School District. School bond. Passes with 55% vote.

Yes57.1%
15,688 votes
No42.8%
11,750 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure J

Sunol Glen Unified School District. School bond. Passes with 55% vote.

Yes59.6%
316 votes
No40.3%
214 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure K

Albany. Special tax. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes76.2%
5,749 votes
No23.7%
1,788 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure L

Berkeley. Infrastructure bond. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes59.4%
26,520 votes
No40.5%
18,114 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure M

Berkeley. Vacant property tax. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes64.9%
28,776 votes
No35%
15,536 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure N

Berkeley. Affordable housing. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes76.1%
33,756 votes
No23.8%
10,591 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure O

Emeryville. Property transfer tax. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes71.2%
2,547 votes
No28.7%
1,027 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure P

Livermore. Urban growth boundary. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes66.5%
21,081 votes
No33.4%
10,576 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure Q

Oakland. Affordable housing. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes80%
100,750 votes
No19.9%
25,088 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure R

Oakland. Gender neutral language. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes75.4%
95,895 votes
No24.5%
31,161 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure S

Oakland. Noncitizen voting. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes66.5%
83,562 votes
No33.4%
41,948 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure T

Oakland. Business taxes. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes71.7%
89,852 votes
No28.2%
35,327 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure U

Oakland. Infrastructure bond. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes75.3%
95,729 votes
No24.6%
31,359 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure W

Oakland. Resident public financing for election campaigns. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes73.9%
91,192 votes
No26%
32,180 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure X

Oakland. Council member term limits. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes80.2%
94,402 votes
No19.7%
23,303 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure Y

Oakland. Funding for Oakland Zoo. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes63%
77,700 votes
No36.9%
45,486 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Measure Z

Union City. Funding for city services. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes74.4%
12,772 votes
No25.5%
4,394 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Alameda County Supervisor, District 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Lena Tam52%
40,190 votes
Rebecca Kaplan47.9%
36,951 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Alameda Mayor

Top candidate wins seat.

Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft(incumbent)59.2%
17,164 votes
Trish Spencer34.6%
10,037 votes
Barack D. Obama Shaw6%
1,748 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Alameda City Council

Top two candidates win seat.

Tony Daysog(incumbent)27.9%
14,089 votes
Tracy Jensen19.5%
9,851 votes
Hannah Groce18.2%
9,218 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Albany City Council

Top two candidates win seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

John Anthony Miki29.9%
2,136 votes
Jennifer Hansen-Romero25.4%
1,811 votes
Robin D. López22.9%
1,632 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Albany Board of Education

Top two candidates win seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Ron Rosenbaum49.8%
3,207 votes
Sadia Khan27.1%
1,749 votes
Becky Hopwood20.3%
1,311 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Berkeley Rent Stabilization Board Commissioners

Top five candidates win seat.

Soli Alpert(incumbent)16.4%
23,849 votes
Nathan Mizell14.6%
21,249 votes
Vanessa Danielle Marrero13.1%
19,121 votes
Stefan Elgstrand12.1%
17,668 votes
Ida Martinac11.8%
17,157 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Berkeley Unified School District Board of Education

Top three candidates win seat.

Ka'Dijah A. Brown(incumbent)28.5%
29,855 votes
Mike Chang21.7%
22,775 votes
Jennifer Shanoski21.6%
22,673 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Berkeley Auditor

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Jenny Wong(incumbent)100%
36,916 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Berkeley City Council, District 1

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Rashi Kesarwani(incumbent)49.6%
3,285 votes
Elisa Mikiten41.5%
2,748 votes
Tamar Michai Freeman8.8%
585 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Berkeley City Council, District 4

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Kate Harrison(incumbent)100%
3,049 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Berkeley City Council, District 7

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Rigel Robinson(incumbent)100%
690 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Berkeley City Council, District 8

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Mark Humbert63.5%
3,286 votes
Mari Mendonca25.8%
1,339 votes
Peter Bruce Dumont4.5%
236 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Dublin Mayor

Top candidate wins seat.

Melissa Hernandez(incumbent)100%
13,810 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Dublin City Council

Top two candidates win seat.

Jean Josey(incumbent)45.7%
10,929 votes
Kashef Qaadri33.5%
8,001 votes
Lynna Lan Tien Nguyen Do20.6%
4,938 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Emeryville City Council

Top two candidates win seat.

Kalimah Priforce27.6%
1,582 votes
David Mourra21.3%
1,223 votes
Brooke Westling18.4%
1,056 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Fremont City Council, District 2

Top candidate wins seat.

Desrie Campbell40.3%
3,591 votes
Robert Daulton37.5%
3,339 votes
Keith Parker22%
1,966 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Fremont City Council, District 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Jenny Kassan(incumbent)43.7%
3,157 votes
Kathy Kimberlin39.8%
2,881 votes
Arif Mohamed16.4%
1,186 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Fremont City Council, District 4

Top candidate wins seat.

Yang Shao(incumbent)56%
4,638 votes
Bryce Beckel43.9%
3,636 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Hayward Mayor

Top candidate wins seat.

Mark Salinas100%
24,888 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Hayward City Council

Top two candidates win seat.

Julie Roche23.6%
11,851 votes
George Syrop16.3%
8,178 votes
Dan Goldstein14.4%
7,242 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Livermore Mayor

Top candidate wins seat.

John Marchand53.2%
17,189 votes
Mony Nop46.7%
15,095 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Livermore City Council, District 1

Top candidate wins seat.

Evan Branning59.1%
3,521 votes
Carol Wahrer40.8%
2,433 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Livermore City Council, District 2

Top candidate wins seat.

Ben Barrientos55%
3,779 votes
Mel Chiong44.9%
3,081 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Newark Mayor

Top candidate wins seat.

Michael Hannon(incumbent)62.9%
6,325 votes
Jason Miguel37%
3,721 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Newark City Council

Top two candidates win seat.

Mike Bucci(incumbent)29.5%
5,274 votes
Matthew Jorgens20.8%
3,729 votes
Terrence Grindall18.3%
3,274 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland City Council, District 2

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Nikki Fortunato Bas67.7%
10,636 votes
Harold Lowe32.2%
5,053 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland City Council, District 4

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Janani Ramachandran68.4%
18,858 votes
Nenna Joiner31.5%
8,685 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland City Council, District 6

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Kevin Jenkins71.2%
10,376 votes
Yakpasua Michael Gbagba Zazaboi11.2%
1,637 votes
Nancy Sidebotham10.5%
1,533 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland Auditor

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Courtney Ruby(incumbent)100%
94,810 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland Unified School District Director, District 2

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Jennifer Brouhard50%
7,459 votes
David Kakishiba33.4%
4,988 votes
Max Orozco16.5%
2,467 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland Unified School District Director, District 4

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Nick Resnick37.9%
9,948 votes
Pecolia Manigo31.1%
8,149 votes
Mike Hutchinson(incumbent)30.9%
8,103 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oakland Unified School District Director, District 6

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Valarie Bachelor48.3%
6,916 votes
Kyra Mungia(incumbent)40.5%
5,805 votes
Joel Velasquez11.1%
1,595 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Piedmont City Council

Top three candidates win seat.

Betsy Smegal Andersen(incumbent)30.4%
4,679 votes
Tom Ramsey25.5%
3,917 votes
Jennifer Long(incumbent)25.3%
3,898 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Piedmont Unified School District Board of Education

Top two candidates win seat.

Ruchi Medhekar43.2%
4,288 votes
Lindsay Thomasson39.7%
3,946 votes
Shirley Hooi17%
1,691 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Pleasanton Mayor

Top candidate wins seat.

Karla Brown(incumbent)100%
22,156 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Pleasanton City Council, District 1

Top candidate wins seat.

Jeff Nibert61.2%
2,790 votes
Dean Wallace38.7%
1,764 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Pleasanton City Council, District 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Julie Testa42.9%
2,816 votes
Joel Liu33.3%
2,186 votes
Jamie Yee23.7%
1,556 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Union City City Council, District 2

Top candidate wins seat.

Jaime Patino56.4%
1,937 votes
Chuck Kennedy43.5%
1,495 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Union City City Council, District 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Jeff Wang45.6%
1,933 votes
Kristy Boer32%
1,356 votes
Lee Guio22.2%
943 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Union City City Council, District 4

Top candidate wins seat.

Scott Sakakihara62.8%
3,027 votes
Vipan S. Bajwa37.1%
1,791 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

San Leandro Mayor

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Bryan Azevedo37.2%
7,866 votes
Juan Gonzalez III36.9%
7,795 votes
Lee Thomas23.3%
4,923 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

San Leandro City Council, District 1

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Celina Reynes49.2%
10,068 votes
Kenneth Pon37.3%
7,623 votes
David L. Anderson Sr.13.4%
2,738 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

San Leandro City Council, District 3

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Victor Aguilar(incumbent)100%
16,424 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

San Leandro City Council, District 5

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Xouhoa Bowen50%
9,362 votes
Monique Tate49.9%
9,325 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Peralta Community College District, Trustee Area 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Louis Quindlen80.7%
11,547 votes
Tarrell Gamble19.2%
2,750 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Peralta Community College District, Trustee Area 5

Top candidate wins seat.

Cindi Reiss(incumbent)59.7%
19,595 votes
Saleem Gilmore40.2%
13,220 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Peralta Community College District, Trustee Area 7

Top candidate wins seat.

Sheweet Yohannes59.1%
13,137 votes
Seth Steward40.8%
9,085 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Alameda Unified School District Governing Board

Top two candidates win seat.

Gary Lym(incumbent)39.5%
17,704 votes
Ryan LaLonde30.6%
13,698 votes
Maria Elena Moreno Van Maren15%
6,716 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Castro Valley Unified School District Governing Board

Top two candidates win seat.

Sara E. Raymond37.5%
9,889 votes
Gary C. Howard(incumbent)33.1%
8,723 votes
Tina Sachs29.2%
7,690 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Dublin Unified School District Governing Board, Area 3, Short Term

Top candidate wins seat.

William Kuo(incumbent)65.1%
1,625 votes
John Wu34.8%
871 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Dublin Unified School District Governing Board, Area 5

Top candidate wins seat.

Dan Cherrier(incumbent)64%
1,914 votes
Sameer Hakim35.9%
1,073 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Emery Unified School District Governing Board

Top three candidates win seat.

Regina Chagolla(incumbent)32.7%
2,255 votes
Brynnda R. Collins(incumbent)26.9%
1,857 votes
Susan Donaldson(incumbent)26.6%
1,837 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Fremont Unified School District Governing Board, Area 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Dianne Jones(incumbent)71.9%
5,992 votes
Jennifer Kavouniaris28%
2,341 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Hayward Unified School District Governing Board, Full Term

Top two candidates win seat.

April Oquenda(incumbent)32.8%
17,255 votes
Ken Rawdon(incumbent)26.6%
13,955 votes
Araceli Orozco21.4%
11,237 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Hayward Unified School District Governing Board, Short Term

Top candidate wins seat.

Joe Orlando Ramos38.4%
11,954 votes
Lisa Brunner35.2%
10,962 votes
George Drapeau26.3%
8,203 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Lammersville Joint Unified School District Governing Board

Top two candidates win seat.

Colin Nelson Clements(incumbent)45.7%
38 votes
Vanitha Daniel(incumbent)38.5%
32 votes
Arjun Juturu15.6%
13 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Lammersville Joint Unified School District Governing Board, Short Term

Top candidate wins seat.

Lisa Boulais(incumbent)60%
33 votes
Jasjeet Kaur21.8%
12 votes
Harmeet Gill18.1%
10 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District Governing Board

Top three candidates win seat.

Emily Prusso(incumbent)19.4%
16,381 votes
Craig Bueno(incumbent)18%
15,193 votes
Steven Drouin15.8%
13,379 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

New Haven Unified School District Governing Board, Area 4

Top candidate wins seat.

Shruti Kumar69.3%
2,368 votes
Ed Mack Agbuya30.6%
1,046 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Newark Unified School District Governing Board

Top two candidates win seat.

Katherine (Kat) Jones37.1%
6,308 votes
Nancy Thomas26%
4,429 votes
Lisa Torres19.9%
3,393 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Pleasanton Unified School District Governing Board, Area 2

Top candidate wins seat.

Laurie E. Walker57.8%
1,900 votes
Urvi Shah33.1%
1,088 votes
Christine L. Lutz8.9%
294 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

San Leandro Unified School District Governing Board, Area 2

Top candidate wins seat.

Jackie Calderón Perl67.3%
8,722 votes
Abbey Kerins32.6%
4,231 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Sunol Glen Unified School District Governing Board, Full Term

Top two candidates win seat.

Ryan Jergensen40%
287 votes
Peter E. ("Ted") Romo31.9%
229 votes
James R. Lowder27.9%
200 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Sunol Glen Unified School District Governing Board, Short Term

Top candidate wins seat.

Linda E. Hurley52.7%
250 votes
Chris Bobertz47.2%
224 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

AC Transit District Director, At-Large

Top candidate wins seat.

Joel Young(incumbent)56.1%
201,179 votes
Alfred Twu43.8%
156,898 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

AC Transit District Director, Ward 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Sarah Syed69.9%
50,457 votes
Stewart G. Chen30%
21,705 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

AC Transit District Director, Ward 4

Top candidate wins seat.

Murphy McCalley(incumbent)63.7%
36,630 votes
Barisha Spriggs36.2%
20,823 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

BART Director, District 6

Top candidate wins seat.

Liz Ames(incumbent)47.6%
39,615 votes
Lance Nishihira32.3%
26,909 votes
Shyam Chetal19.9%
16,593 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Dublin San Ramon Services District Director, Division 5, Short Term

Top candidate wins seat.

Arun Goel(incumbent)67.5%
3,054 votes
Seema Badar32.4%
1,464 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

East Bay Municipal Utility District Director, Ward 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Marguerite Young(incumbent)85.9%
42,548 votes
Mark Seedall14%
6,950 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

East Bay Municipal Utility District Director, Ward 7

Top candidate wins seat.

April Chan34.5%
14,408 votes
Corina N. Lopez34.2%
14,268 votes
Matt Turner31.1%
12,974 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

East Bay Regional Park District Director, Ward 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Dennis Waespi(incumbent)71.2%
59,616 votes
Daphne Lin16.6%
13,970 votes
Gina M. Lewis12%
10,081 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Eden Township Healthcare District Director, Area 3

Top candidate wins seat.

Roxann V. Lewis(incumbent)50.6%
10,697 votes
Gordon A. Galvan(incumbent)49.3%
10,414 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Eden Township Healthcare District Director, Area 5

Top candidate wins seat.

Ed Hernandez76.5%
12,786 votes
Chike Udemezue23.4%
3,921 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Fairview Fire Protection District Directors

Top two candidates win seat.

Robert Clark(incumbent)42.9%
2,879 votes
Michael D. Justice(incumbent)35.2%
2,365 votes
Leilani Nguyen21.8%
1,466 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Livermore Area Recreation & Park District Directors

Top three candidates win seat.

Philip Pierpont(incumbent)23.7%
18,074 votes
David Furst(incumbent)22.1%
16,842 votes
Maryalice Summers Faltings(incumbent)20.5%
15,624 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Oro Loma Sanitary District Directors

Top three candidates win seat.

Shelia Young(incumbent)26.5%
16,009 votes
Fred Simon(incumbent)21.4%
12,936 votes
Rita Duncan(incumbent)18.3%
11,060 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County
 

District Attorney

Terry Wiley and Pamela Price are facing off in a tight race to be Alameda County’s next district attorney, replacing Nancy O’Malley who is retiring after serving for more than a decade as the county’s top prosecutor. The two candidates facing off present an insider vs. outsider choice for voters: Wiley, the county’s chief assistant district attorney, against Price, a progressive civil rights lawyer.

Top candidate wins seat.

Pamela Price53.1%
228,721 votes
Terry Wiley46.8%
201,676 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Candidates

Pamela Price
Civil Rights Attorney
Terry Wiley
Chief District Attorney
 

Positions on Key Issues
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.

Priorities

What will be your top three priorities as DA, and how do you plan to tackle them?

Price says one of her top priorities is to “stop over-criminalizing youth.” “I am the only candidate to commit to not charge youth 18-and-under as adults,” she says. “There are no circumstances under which I believe a juvenile should be prosecuted as an adult.” Price also vows to reduce the flow of guns into the county and to stop sex trafficking. “We need to support these young people,” she says. “Housing is at the heart of the solution. … And this is a solution that has only received minimal attention from the current DA in the past 20 years.”

Wiley says his top priorities include ensuring the community is protected against violent crime. “In our new Crime Strategies Unit, experienced prosecutors will be part of a more proactive, data-driven approach to crime fighting, focusing on the 2,000 repeat offenders who commit the majority of violent crimes in Alameda County,” he says. Wiley is also promising to combat anti-Asian violence and domestic violence. He points to his work as a prosecutor in a 2005 trial against a group of Oakland police officers known as “the Riders,” and says he’ll increase training and oversight of police in an effort to root out bias.

Diversion

Alameda has more diversion courts than most counties in the state, yet a 2021 report from Urban Peace Movement and the ACLU found that only 5.4% of low-level misdemeanor cases were sent to diversion courts in 2017 and 2018. As DA, how will your office make use of the county’s diversion courts and what challenges, if any, do you anticipate?

Price says the current menu of options, as noted, is underutilized and unsupported, and that the criteria to access and benefit from our diversion courts is too restrictive. “The current DA’s office gives excuses for limiting access to these programs, while acting as gatekeepers to justice,” she says. “When elected, we will conduct an immediate assessment of the current criteria and resources available for each alternative court and set quantifiable goals to increase the effective use of these courts while also working to establish a network of neighborhood court systems.”

Wiley says the 5.4% statistic does not account for the many variables that make it difficult to grant diversion programs. “In many cases, the offenders have multiple (felony and misdemeanor) cases pending in Alameda County and surrounding jurisdictions,” he says. “It also does not include the numerous cases where the public defender recommended against taking the diversion program because misdemeanors now have only a one-year probation period (and) the diversion programs are typically 18 months.” Wiley says he still wants to increase referrals to drug treatment and mental health care programs.

Police Misconduct

What do you see as the greatest challenge DAs face when investigating and charging police misconduct? How do you plan to overcome that?

Price says the biggest challenge has two components: demonstrating independent analysis and judgment in investigations, and holding police agencies accountable to a standard of integrity. “A good working relationship with local law enforcement is where a DA uses her authority in a balanced, fair and measured way to make sure justice is served,” she says. “Given that police officers are entrusted with serving and protecting unlike any other citizen, they also deserve to be held to a higher standard — not a lower standard.” Price wants police-related lethal force investigations to be overseen by independent, trusted bodies.

Wiley says, in his 32 years of experience, he has seen few exceptions where decisions involving officer-involved shootings haven’t been difficult. He promises to bring “firm principles” to his work on this issue. “You must have clear policies that everyone understands where the line is and should not be crossed,” he says. “You must make principled decisions if the lines are crossed. You cannot allow your decisions to become political footballs where you move in whatever direction the wind is blowing.”

Santa Rita Jail

Santa Rita Jail is the largest provider of mental health services in Alameda County. It’s also one of the most dangerous jails in the country. What are your thoughts on that? How would you treat mentally ill people who are accused of committing crimes?

Price points to a 2021 U.S. Department of Justice report that found mental health care at the Santa Rita Jail violated the constitutional rights of mentally ill prisoners. “The role of the DA should not be to incarcerate people with serious mental illness because of their illness,” she says. “We need to expand the criteria for our behavioral health court and create a working group to rethink how mental health services are delivered in Alameda County.” Price vows to champion community-based mental health services to reduce crime without increasing incarceration.

Wiley believes law enforcement is ill-equipped to provide mental health services, and that this has resulted in unfortunate deaths at Santa Rita Jail. “We must rethink how we deal with individuals suffering from mental health challenges,” he says. Wiley points to his involvement with Alameda County’s Reimagine Adult Justice, which strives to reduce the county’s reliance on incarceration. He says the initiative includes exploring “the potential establishment of civilian oversight of the Alameda County Sheriff’s Department.”

Anti-Asian Hate

What role do you think the DA’s office should play in combating crimes against Asian Americans?

Price says the DA’s job is to protect public safety “for all communities.” The DA, she adds, “cannot justify prioritizing one community based on its racial or ethnic identity while ignoring the needs of other racial, ethnic or religious minorities.” Price says her office will reflect the diversity of Alameda County, and prosecutors will be trained to deliver victim services in culturally responsive ways. “We must insist that Alameda County be a hate-free zone for all of us,” she says, “and amplify the message that ‘an injury to one is an injury to all.’”

Wiley points to a town hall he recently held in Oakland’s Little Saigon, where he heard stories of attacks against members of the community and the subsequent psychological damage these have inflicted in the form of depression, PTSD and a general fear of leaving the house. “The district attorney’s office will provide expanded trauma-informed victim services, including providing language interpreters to improve reporting of crimes,” Wiley says, adding that he also intends to expand the DA’s Special Prosecutions Team focused on anti-Asian hate crimes. “We will not tolerate Asians being victimized simply because they are Asian,” he says.

 

Your Questions, Answered

We brought your questions to the candidates and got their answers to the questions most important to you.

Ryia in Pleasanton asks:

What do you plan to do about the officers reinstated that were found ill equipped to serve?

Price says “Public safety requires public trust. As DA, our transition team will vet how these particular deputies affected any pending or past cases, and whether they were implicated in any injuries or deaths that took place at SRJ. We will work with the new Sheriff to ensure those who are supposed to protect public safety are fit for the task. My position is that not only is it a violation of state law to hire someone as a peace officer who fails a psychological exam, it is a threat to public safety that cannot be tolerated in our criminal justice system.”

Wiley says “Everyone who works in the criminal justice system should be qualified to do so. Lives are at stake. I will work to make sure that the people who do the hard, and sometimes dangerous work, of guaranteeing our public safety are supported – including supporting their mental health.  If we find that people in the system are no longer able to do this work even after support and treatment, we need to find them appropriate jobs in other areas.”

Key Supporters
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

 

Oakland Mayor

Whichever candidate replaces termed-out Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf will have their hands full. Many residents think the city isn’t adequately serving their needs. Critical issues, including homelessness, housing affordability, violence and public education are top of mind for voters. Of the 10 candidates on the ballot, three currently serve on the City Council — Loren Taylor, Sheng Thao and Treva Reid. Another well-known contender, Ignacio De La Fuente, served five terms on the council before stepping down in 2012. It’s unclear how city government experience will sway voters. And because of ranked-choice voting, the race could be unpredictable, and a winner possibly won’t be decided until well after Election Day. A last-minute addition to the ballot is civil rights attorney Allyssa Victory Villanueva, who was allowed back in the race after the city initially disqualified her for not having the required number of signatures, but later admitted it had misread her paperwork filing. See information on all candidates in this race.

Top candidate wins seat. If no candidate wins majority, instant runoff using ranked choice voting.

Loren Manuel Taylor33%
41,468 votes
Sheng Thao31.7%
39,872 votes
Ignacio De La Fuente10.2%
12,884 votes

Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Candidates

Treva Reid
Oakland Councilmember
Sheng Thao
Oakland Councilmember
Loren Taylor
Oakland Councilmember
Ignacio De La Fuente
Former Oakland Councilmember
Allyssa Victory Villanueva
Civil Rights Attorney
 

Positions on Key Issues
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.

Homelessness

What is your plan to decrease homelessness in Oakland? If elected, where would you start?

Reid, a first-term council member who represents District 7 in East Oakland, calls homelessness in the city “a humanitarian crisis.” She notes that Black people account for 70% of Oakland’s unhoused population, despite making up only 24% of the general population. “The systemic disinvestment of affordable housing, subsidies and housing vouchers is egregious and does not uplift our value in Oakland for housing as a human right,” Reid says. As mayor, she promises to enforce and staff the city’s Encampment Management Policy; audit existing revenue streams designed to alleviate homelessness; and use public land — especially in transit corridors — to develop temporary and permanent housing solutions for transitional-age youth, veterans and seniors.

Thao, who has represented District 4 in the Oakland Hills since 2018, says the city’s solution to homelessness must include an expansion of housing initiatives, mental health and addiction services, and job training programs. “Having experienced homelessness myself as a young, single mother, I know firsthand how hard it is to access services and how urgent it is for Oakland to make it easier to get off the streets,” Thao says. She opposes spending money on temporary Tuff Shed shelters, and instead wants to build more transitional-housing projects. Thao is also pushing for money to pay for legal counsel for tenants facing evictions, and recently voted to cap rent increases at 3% for rent-controlled apartments. 

Taylor, who has represented East Oakland’s District 6 since 2018, calls reducing homelessness a top priority. “I’ll close unsafe encampments, move unhoused neighbors into shelters and provide them with the full complement of services they need,” he says. He touts his role in creating the city’s Encampment Management Policy, and vows in his first 100 days as mayor to fund the teams responsible for enacting the plan. Taylor also promises to double funding for outreach and prevention services, such as rent relief programs and legal assistance — while also creating a public report card to gauge the performance of outreach providers in getting unsheltered residents into housing. 

De La Fuente vows to “assemble the best team and implement my plan for a concerted and effective approach to address and decrease homelessness.” He is calling for stricter enforcement of an Oakland law that bans homeless encampments near schools, businesses, residences and parks. The policy is an attempt to balance the needs and rights of the unsheltered with those of their housed neighbors. “The Encampment Management Policy claims that it is necessary to address the emergency needs of our unhoused residents, but what about our residents who are at risk of experiencing homelessness and other tax-paying residents who need help?” De La Fuente says.

Victory Villanueva says the city’s current plans are failing and exacerbating the problem, and notes that she has opposed the Encampment Management Policy since it was adopted. “My plan is to stop managing tent encampments and instead focus on drastically expanding our shelter beds, transitional and permanent housing options,” she says. “We are using our entire city and all public (and even private) spaces as shelters because the city will not adequately house people or get us out of ‘crisis’ levels.” Villanueva has pledged to remove unhoused people from the streets and provide them with adequate housing options by making better use of public land and taking more advantage of emergency resources and existing fees and taxes already designated for housing. She also stresses the need to be more creative with planning and zoning rules.

Housing

Housing affordability has been a dire issue in Oakland for decades, one that particularly impacts Black and brown renters. In what ways would your administration address the housing crisis?

Reid says Oaklanders should not have to choose between paying for housing or food and health services, and should not be forced to work multiple jobs simply to afford to live in the city they love. “Too many of our neighbors are struggling with housing insecurity like I’ve faced,” she says, vowing to increase funding for more affordable housing and to streamline the approval process. She also pledges to leverage public and private partnerships to build enough housing to meet regional goals, and intends to build on a recent $5 million state investment to expand the city’s teacher and workforce housing programs.

Thao says there’s a huge opportunity to build new affordable housing units on city-owned property, and touts her experience working toward that goal. “The 12th Street parcel by Lake Merritt is a good example. It has sat vacant for years waiting for development. Now, through the work of just a few of us on the council, there will be two 100% affordable housing developments breaking ground this year and next,” she says. Although she notes that Oakland has been leading the Bay Area in housing construction, “we are building less than 50% of our required affordable housing, and it shows. We need new solutions that lead to new revenue streams.” Her proposals include creating an infrastructure-financing district and changing various zoning and bureaucratic restrictions to facilitate the development of more affordable housing. Thao has also pledged to expand the city’s first-time homeowner program and establish a public bank to create easier financing options.

Taylor says the housing affordability crisis is a supply problem that requires the construction of more homes. “That means prioritizing building both affordable and market-rate housing,” he says. “I applaud the state, including our local representatives, for leading the way in providing cities with more tools to build more housing units, and I embrace the fact that my job as mayor will be to bring residents, workers, and builders together to support projects that are economically viable and that respect the communities that are here and the people who want to be here.”

De La Fuente points to the affordable housing development that took place in District 5 during the two decades he represented the district. “I will work with the public and private sector to build more affordable housing and prioritize the improvement of basic city services that will allow the city and builders to make the progress that our community so desperately needs,” he says.

Victory Villanueva insists that housing must be affordable for everyone in the city, across all income levels. “I will preserve existing affordable housing units, effectively use all city fees and taxes designated for this purpose, including our vacant parcel tax, and expand financing mechanisms for developing more affordable housing,” she says. To that end, she has proposed creating a public banking system and expanding the city’s guaranteed basic income pilots and rental assistance programs. “Our workers must be able to own their communities,” she adds. “I also support pathways to homeownership which the city can help by alleviating procedural and financial barriers to first-time homeownership.” 

Anti-Asian Hate

How is the Asian community going to be better protected under your leadership?

Reid says she will continue to meet with Asian community members to hear their concerns and respond “with solutions, not excuses.” She plans to expand the Mobile Assistance Community Responders of Oakland, or MACRO, a community response program for non-emergency 911 calls, to serve Chinatown and Little Saigon and ensure there is sufficient AAPI representation on her staff. She has also pledged to partner with the district attorney’s office to more effectively prevent and solve crimes against AAPI community members. “We have for too long been witnessing a severe uptick in the violent crimes afflicted upon our Asian American communities in Oakland,” she says.

Thao notes that her parents met in a refugee camp after fleeing the secret war in Laos in the 1970s. “I understand the fear and trauma so many Asian families hold,” she says, adding that she is also a survivor of domestic violence. “As mayor, I will be a voice for our Asian and refugee communities and will work to ensure they have the support and services they need,” she says. Thao touts her role in increasing public-safety funding and staffing in Chinatown and Little Saigon, and promises to continue aggressively combating hate crimes against not only Asian communities but all vulnerable groups in the city. “We need solidarity with all communities across Oakland, and a mayor who will fight for and uphold the values of our diverse city,” she says.

Taylor says he will not tolerate any kind of hate in the city. He plans to invest in more community-safety officers from the AAPI community to patrol in vulnerable communities. “I will also work to ensure staffing levels can meet the large demand we currently have to close off cases of violent hate crimes related to AAPI residents in Oakland,” he adds.

De La Fuente promises to create a special police unit to focus on public safety in high-crime areas where Asian Americans have been targeted. “All Oaklanders lose when people, groups are targeted and attacked, and city leadership needs to respond in kind with zero-tolerance measures that result in the efficient and effective enforcement of laws that will keep the Asian American community safe,” he says.

Victory Villanueva says she was raised in this community and has a long record of organizing with multi-racial coalitions. “Oakland is home to a historic Chinatown (that) must be protected and preserved, but I also will support expanding and investing in our cultural districts, including Little Saigon and Koreatown,” she says. “Chinatown also reminds us that Asian American communities were redlined and excluded from parts of our civic life and government, with Oakland as no exception.”  

Public Safety

There’s a general feeling that crime is out of control, particularly in Oakland where homicides have risen significantly since 2019. How will your administration decrease crime? Do you believe more police officers are the solution?

Reid says much of the lawlessness and reckless behavior in Oakland has gone unchecked for too long. As a council member, Reid says she has championed public-safety priorities “from day one,” an issue she considers of immense personal importance, noting the death of her son to gun violence. Reid says that police need more support to do their jobs effectively, but has also called for a greater degree of accountability and oversight. She has pledged to significantly expand violence prevention and trauma-care programs during her first year as mayor, and to secure state and federal funding for four more police academies, as well as additional school safety and community mental health resources. She also vows to install public safety surveillance cameras in business corridors and partner with Caltrans to combat crime on local freeways. 

Thao claims that over the last four years, she has worked to allocate more money than anyone else on the council for public safety — including both policing and prevention. “For policing, I’ve gotten funding for three additional academies, created incentives to retain officers and to recruit lateral officers from other jurisdictions,” she says, noting that both approaches cost significantly less than recruiting and training new officers. She says she worked closely with OPD Chief LeRonne Armstrong to create a more diverse and Oakland-grown police department and focus to a greater degree on local recruitment and more diversity outreach. “It’s working. The diversity of our cadets is really starting to reflect in our work,” she says. Thao also vows to “get to the root of crime,” and says she plans to double the city’s Department of Violence Prevention budget and sufficiently invest in public schools, child care and pre-K programs.

Taylor says he rejects “the framing that it’s either police and enforcement or violence prevention and root-causes intervention” that will be the key to reducing violent crime. “Yes, more police officers are needed, which is why I led the charge in the City Council to invest in additional police academies,” he says, noting that he has also fought to make sure officers are “better trained, better equipped and more responsive to calls for help.” But Taylor also insists that a larger police presence alone “without increased investment in prevention and increased focus on community trust-building is not a solution at all.”

De La Fuente says increasing the number of quality police officers is a key part of the solution, but “not the be-all and end-all.” He aims to ensure officers have the technology and political support they need to effectively solve crimes and increase public safety. He says he also intends to support community-based violence interruption and community policing programs, but thinks the first priority should be to “get a firm handle on violence in Oakland.”

Victory Villanueva says “public safety is determined by the public, not any magic number of officers. Police officers are often called when a crime is in progress or (has) already occurred.” She adds that crime prevention starts with ensuring that residents are getting their basic needs met in an equitable manner. “Housing, job access, education and health care are all part of crime prevention and keeping our public safe,” she says. “The safest communities are not those with the most police and the most weaponry, but those with the most resources and highest investment in residents.”

Schools

Recent school closures in Oakland have sparked intense ire among the disproportionately Black communities that have been most impacted. How do you plan to address this intensely controversial issue?

Reid calls the recent school closure decision “beyond troubling in the midst of the persisting pandemic.” She says the move, like many others, has disproportionately impacted Black students and families. As mayor, Reid says she will continue to work with OUSD to “reimagine” public schools by increasing investment and services to support students and families. She also pledges to push the school board to enact its resolution offering reparations to Black students and to secure $1 million in food cards for lower-income families to use at small grocery stores in their neighborhoods. Reid additionally has vowed to advocate for increased state and federal funds to provide mental health care at school sites, and offer social and wraparound services for students and parents.

Thao says she led the council’s efforts against school closures, and has worked with state lawmakers to secure additional support for Oakland schools. “These closures are primarily in Black and brown communities and were implemented without a community process or engagement,” she says.“(They) impact some of Oakland’s most vulnerable youth and send the wrong message about our priorities.” Thao says that while the school district is not the direct responsibility of the mayor, “I have already shown that I will not sit on the sidelines while our public schools are in jeopardy.” 

Taylor says the closures are “a critical issue impacting our children, particularly Black children,” and has called for stronger collaborations between city and school leaders, as well as greater accountability for educational service providers the city contracts with. As mayor, he promises to pursue innovative strategies to enhance educational outcomes for underserved students, and points to his efforts on the council in helping to expand broadband access, and in pushing for increased investment in early literacy programs.

De La Fuente says this issue does not fall under his primary focus of reducing crime and homelessness and improving basic city services. “I will work within the structures of the mayor to hold our Oakland Unified School District leadership accountable for addressing issues like this that fall within their purview, and invite community leaders to do the same,” he says.

Victory Villanueva says she supports local campaigns against school closures, reparations for Black students and police-free schools. She also approves of community-run schools when “our district is failing to provide accessible and adequate education,” and has vowed to always advocate for equal opportunity, particularly for “Black Oaklanders harmed by decades of unjust policies.” She says that the city government, while separate from the school board, has a duty to be closely involved in school-based decisions, and vows to regularly communicate with the board, and report complaints from her constituents. 

 

Your Questions, Answered

We brought your questions to the candidates and got their answers to the questions most important to you.

Kelley in West Oakland asks:

Pot holes are a seemingly endemic problem in Oakland streets in poorer neighborhoods, they cause frequent tire damage and multiple accidents in efforts to avoid jagged potholes how are you planning on addressing this issue?

De La Fuente says "I have lived in Oakland for over 51 years and know that the city has an over one-hundred year old infrastructure that has not been properly prioritized or maintenanced. To answer your question directly, I am determined to address potholes as part of my back to basics approach. We must acknowledge that programs like the city’s pothole blitz program, although encouraging, is a patchwork approach that does not address deteriorating road infrastructure across the city. We need a multifaceted, city-wide approach that equitably addresses road infrastructure for all of Oakland."

Key Supporters
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

 

State Senate, District 10

Outgoing state Sen. Bob Wieckowski is termed out, leaving open a seat in a district that stretches from Hayward to Sunnyvale. Roughly 44% of the citizen voting-age population in the district is Asian, the largest share of any Senate district in the state. In the June primary, Mei came out on top with 33% of the vote, to Wahab’s 30%, with outside groups contributing heavily to both sides.

Top candidate wins seat.

Aisha Wahab (D)53.7%
114,887 votes
Lily Mei (D)46.2%
98,933 votes
Race called at 4:43 PM PT on November 21, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

Candidates

Lily Mei
Fremont Mayor
DEMOCRAT
Aisha Wahab
Hayward Councilmember
DEMOCRAT
 

Positions on Key Issues
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.

Homelessness

Why are you the best candidate to address the state’s homelessness crisis?

Mei touts her experience as mayor of Fremont, where she led a push to open the city’s first navigation center in 2020, a shelter where unhoused people can connect with service providers. She notes how the project was controversial from the get-go, and faced intense local backlash, but says she is “really proud of the results.” A year after it opened, 31 of the center's 66 unhoused participants have found permanent housing. Mei says she would try to build on the navigation center model statewide, if elected to the Legislature.

Wahab also points to her strong support, as a City Council member, for a new navigation center in Hayward in 2019. “We worked with the community,” she says, adding, “We actually didn't, unlike a lot of other cities, have pushback.” In its first year, 45 of the center’s 91 residents found permanent housing. Wahab says she aspires to champion measures in the state Legislature that give local residents priority for spots in new housing developments.

Housing

What housing policies would you support if elected?

Mei says she supported a streamlined, online permitting process for creating accessory dwelling units (ADUs) in Fremont. As a state legislator, she pledges to advocate for more funding for workforce housing and to improve communication with residents and local officials about pending state housing proposals. “It’s easier to adopt something if people understand the impacts,” she says.

Wahab says she would push for a statewide inclusionary housing policy, requiring builders to earmark a certain number of units for affordable housing in every new development. “If the state is willing to say, ‘OK, every single development needs to have 10% affordable housing,’ I think that's the responsible approach,” she says.

Public Safety

What approaches do you support to bolster public safety?

Mei says she would “like to revisit” a provision in Proposition 47 that increased the monetary threshold — from $400 to $950 — at which theft could be prosecuted as a felony. “It has gotten very challenging for our police and our community,” she says. “We should not be rewarding people and giving them the idea that you can commit a crime.” As mayor of Fremont, Mei supported funding a controversial program to place police officers in Fremont schools, saying the decision reflected concerns raised by the local PTA.

Wahab says the punishment of thefts should be reformed to provide more restitution, with a focus on restorative justice. “That means hours of (community) service,” she says. “That means giving back to those individuals that were violated.” She points to her vote as a council member to create a mental health crisis team to handle some emergency calls. “This project actually allows for the police to focus on actual crime,” says Wahab.

Key Supporters
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

 

Measure V

Should the city of Oakland amend its current just cause for eviction ordinance?

This measure would extend eviction protections to tenants in RVs and new units, except for accessory dwelling units (ADUs), during the 10-year period after construction. It would remove failure to execute a new lease as a just cause for eviction.  It would also prohibit the eviction of educators and children during the academic school year. Passes with a majority vote. Read the full measure here.

Oakland. Just cause evictions. Passes with a majority vote.

Yes68.3%
84,685 votes
No31.6%
39,292 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Yes Argument

Measure V prevents teachers and students from being displaced during the school year, in an effort to minimize disruption within Oakland schools. Just cause for eviction requires that landlords provide a valid reason for evicting a tenant, and protects renters against discrimination, retaliation, harassment and displacement.

No Argument

Measure V could discourage developers from building in the city, which could harm renters by limiting new housing. The measure would needlessly add further regulations and red tape to the no-fault eviction process, which is already regulated by the California Tenant Protection Act of 2019.

Key Supporters

Key Opponents

  • California Apartment Association
  • East Bay Rental Housing Association
 

Measure U

Should the city of Oakland issue up to $850 million in general obligation bonds to invest in housing for the homeless and in neighborhood infrastructure projects?

The bond would raise $350 million for the purchase, renovation or construction of affordable housing, and $290 million for street and sidewalk fixes. Additional funds could be used for parks and open spaces, libraries, police and fire stations, and other city facilities. Passes with a two-thirds vote. Read the full measure here

Oakland. Infrastructure bond. Passes with 2/3 vote.

Yes75.3%
95,729 votes
No24.6%
31,359 votes
Updated at 7:18 PM PT on November 22, 2022
Alameda County

Yes Argument

Measure U would create additional housing units for families and individuals experiencing homelessness, as well as for some child care providers, teachers and other essential workers. It would also invest in neighborhoods by repaving streets; eliminating potholes; and upgrading libraries, parks and recreation centers.

No Argument

Measure U promises to put money toward the same purposes as Measure KK, which voters passed in 2016. But we still don’t know how much affordable housing was built or how many streets were repaved with the $600 million bond that resulted from that. This new measure does not include accountability benchmarks, like the number of housing units to be built or the number of streets to be repaved, and at what cost. Furthermore, the repayment of the $850 million in bonds, accounting for interest, is expected to cost homeowners $1.7 billion in property taxes.

Key Supporters

  • Terra Cole Brown, executive director, Oakland Parks and Recreation Foundation
  • Gloria Bruce, executive director, East Bay Housing Organizations
  • Chris Hwang, president, Walk Oakland Bike Oakland
  • Kathryn Sterbenc, president, Friends of the Oakland Public Library
  • James Vann, co-founder, Oakland Tenants Union

Key Opponents

  • Jill Broadhurst, resident/community volunteer/small-business owner, Oakland
  • Marcus Crawley, president, Alameda County Taxpayers’ Association
  • Ignacio De La Fuente, resident/former City Council member, Oakland
  • Thomas Rubin, vice president, Alameda County Taxpayers’ Association
  • Marleen Sacks, resident/attorney, Oakland