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With Calls to #StopAAPIHate, Specificity Matters

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A group of demonstrators hold signs that say, 'Stop Asian Hate' during a vigil and rally in San Francisco’s Chinatown on March 20, 2021.
A group of demonstrators hold signs that say 'Stop Asian Hate' during a vigil and rally in San Francisco’s Chinatown on March 20, 2021. (Beth LaBerge/KQED)

The killing of eight people in Georgia, six of whom were women of Asian descent, has led to marches and rallies in the Bay Area in support of the AAPI community. It’s also prompted many people to share experiences they’ve had with racism and sexism.

But as organizer and advocate Hyejin Shim says, it’s also important to be specific about who was targeted in the Atlanta shooting. Because when we do that, we can also pave the way for solutions that protect those who are most vulnerable to racist and sexist violence.

Guest: Hyejin Shim, member of Survived and Punished and Korean American Coalition to End Domestic Abuse

More Resources: Asian Women’s Shelter, Red Canary Song

Episode transcript here.

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