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Upcoming Broadcasts:

Decoding Da Vinci (#4621) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)

Journey to Florence to discover how Leonardo da Vinci used science, from human dissections to innovative painting techniques, to create his legendary artwork. Learn why Mona Lisa's smile is so captivating - and what it took to create it.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Thu, Nov 14, 2019 -- 3:00am
  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 14, 2019 -- 11:00am
  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 14, 2019 -- 4:00pm
  • KQED World: Thu, Nov 14, 2019 -- 4:00pm
  • KQED World: Fri, Nov 15, 2019 -- 5:00am
  • KQED World: Fri, Nov 15, 2019 -- 11:00am Remind me

The Violence Paradox (#4622) Duration: 1:56:46 STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)

Violence is all over the news. But some say we're living in the most peaceful time in history. Journey through time and the human mind to investigate whether-and how-violence has declined. And witness how people are working to stop violence today.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Nov 20, 2019 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Nov 21, 2019 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 21, 2019 -- 11:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Thu, Nov 21, 2019 -- 4:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Nov 22, 2019 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Nov 22, 2019 -- 11:00am Remind me

Why Sharks Attack (#4111) Duration: 54:51 STEREO TVPG

In recent years, an unusual spate of deadly shark attacks has gripped Australia, resulting in five deaths in 10 months. At the same time, great white sharks have begun appearing in growing numbers off the beaches of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, not far from the waters where Steven Spielberg filmed the ultimate shark fright film, Jaws. What's behind the mysterious arrival of this apex predator in an area where they've rarely been seen for hundreds of years? Are deadly encounters with tourists inevitable? To separate fact from fear, NOVA teams up with leading shark experts in Australia and the United States to discover the science behind the great white's hunting instincts. Do sharks ever target humans or is each attack a tragic case of mistaken identity? Can a deeper understanding of shark senses lead scientists to design effective deterrents and help prevent future attacks? With shark populations around the world plummeting, scientists race to unlock the secrets of these powerful creatures of the deep in their quest to save people -- and sharks.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 21, 2019 -- 4:00pm Remind me

Animal Espionage (#4623) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)

Camera traps and drones are revolutionizing the study of wildlife by providing an up-close look at animals without disturbing them. See how these technologies are helping us understand everything from mysterious whale behavior to tiger migration.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Nov 27, 2019 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Nov 28, 2019 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 28, 2019 -- 11:00am Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Thu, Nov 28, 2019 -- 4:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Thu, Nov 28, 2019 -- 4:00pm Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Nov 29, 2019 -- 5:00am Remind me
  • KQED World: Fri, Nov 29, 2019 -- 11:00am Remind me

Bigger Than T.rex (#4119H) Duration: 56:46 STEREO TVPG

Almost a century ago, paleontologists found the first tantalizing hints of a monster even bigger than Tyrannosaurus Rex, perhaps the largest predator ever to walk the Earth: spectacular fossil bones from a dinosaur dubbed Spinosaurus. But the fossils were completely destroyed during a World War II Allied bombing raid, leaving only drawings, lots of questions, and a mystery: What was Spinosaurus? Now, the discovery of new bones in a Moroccan cliff face is reopening the investigation into this epic beast. What did it feed on and how? Why did it grow so big? We follow the paleontologists who are reconstructing this terrifying carnivore piece by piece, revealing a 53-foot-long behemoth with a huge dorsal sail, enormous, scimitar-like claws, and massive superjaws, tapered toward the front like a crocodile, hosting an army of teeth. It is a painstaking puzzle, and it is missing many of its pieces. NOVA follows researchers on the hunt for more fossils, tracing ancient history along with the very modern drama of how the bones of the Spinosaurus were discovered, seized, bombed, stolen and smuggled across international borders. Bringing together experts in paleontology, geology, climatology and paleobotany, this NOVA/National Geographic special brings to life the lost world over which Spinosaurus reigned more than 65 million years ago.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Dec 11, 2019 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Dec 12, 2019 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Wed, Dec 18, 2019 -- 11:00am Remind me

Inside Animal Minds: Who's The Smartest? (#4110H) Duration: 54:21 STEREO TVG

What would it be like to go inside the mind of an animal? We have all gazed into a creature's eyes and wondered: what is it thinking about? What does it really know? Now, the revolutionary science of animal cognition is revealing hard evidence about how animals understand the world around them, uncovering their remarkable problem-solving abilities and exploring the complexity of their powers of communication and even their emotions. In this mini-series, NOVA explores these breakthroughs through three iconic creatures: dogs, birds and dolphins. We'll travel into the spectacularly nuanced noses of dogs and wolves, and ask whether their reliance on different senses has shaped their evolution. We'll see through the eyes of a starling in flight and test the tool-using skills of the smartest of birds, the crow. We'll listen in as scientists track dolphins in the Caribbean and elephants on the African savannah, trying to unlock the secrets of animal communication. As we discover how researchers are pushing the animal mind to its limits, we'll uncover surprising similarities to -- and differences from -- the human mind. What makes an animal smart? Many scientists believe the secret lies in relationships. Throughout the animal kingdom, some of the cleverest creatures - including humans - seem to be those who live in complex social groups, like dolphins, elephants and apes. Could the skills required to keep track of friend and foe make animals smarter? To find out, NOVA goes inside the social lives of some of the smartest animals on the planet.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Dec 18, 2019 -- 9:00pm Remind me
  • KQED 9: Thu, Dec 19, 2019 -- 3:00am Remind me
  • KQED Plus: Thu, Dec 26, 2019 -- 11:00am Remind me
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TV Technical Issues

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    KQED DTV Channels

    KQED 9, KQET

    KQED 9 / KQET

    Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
    XFINITY 9 and HD 709
    Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code.
    Outstanding PBS programming, KQED original productions, and more.

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    KQED Plus, KQET

    KQED Plus / KQEH

    Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
    XFINITY 10 and HD 710
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    KQED Plus, formerly KTEH.
    Unique programs including the best British dramas, mysteries, and comedies.

    PBS Kids

    PBS Kids

    Channel 54.4, 25.4, and 9.4
    XFINITY 192 (Monterey/Salinas 372 and Sacramento/Fairfield 391)
    Wave: Channel # may vary.
    Quality children's programming. Live streaming 24/7 at pbskids.org.

    KQED World

    KQED World

    Channel 9.3, 54.3 and 25.3
    XFINITY 190 Monterey/Salinas 371 and Sacramento/Fairfield 390)
    Wave: Channel # may vary.
    Thought-provoking television — public affairs, local and world events, nature, history, and science.