PHOTOS: Bay Area Women's Marches Take to Streets Amid Concerns Over Inclusion Nationwide

Becky Denevan of Fremont with her 1-year-old granddaughter Kerrigan Elizabeth Myers of Antioch at the Oakland Women's March. Denevan says three generations of the family's women came to today's march. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)

Updated Saturday, 3:25 p.m.

Tens of thousands of people across the region, state and country took to the streets on Saturday to support women and protest President Trump in the third annual Women's March, even as concerns over how inclusive the movement is play out nationwide.

The main march took place in Washington D.C., and more than a dozen sister marches went on throughout Northern California from Redding down to San Jose.

The biggest marches were in San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose and Sacramento, cities which drew large crowds to their marches the past two years.

There's also been increased attention on the march in Eureka, which was cancelled by its organizers in December because of a lack of diversity. But the march was reorganized under new leadership, even as some — including the original organizers — boycotted the event.

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Diversity and inclusivity have plagued the entire Women's March movement, especially in recent months.

Some have long complained that the marches do not represent all women, with recent criticism focusing on anti-Semitic comments made by some leaders of Women's March Inc. (the most visible national organization associated with the march) and their connections to Louis Farrakhan, a Nation of Islam leader who has made anti-Semitic and homophobic comments in the past.

Three Jewish women were named to the national march's steering committee earlier this month, and the homepage of its website features three separate "Official statements on anti-Semitism and all forms of bigotry" posted over the last year.

The local marches are organized separately from the national march, but the San Francisco march posted an open letter to the city's Jewish community earlier this week in response to the concerns.

Sights and Sounds From Local Marches

Oakland

Thousands gathered in Oakland for the third annual Oakland Women's March at Lake Merritt.
Thousands gathered in Oakland for the third annual Oakland Women's March at Lake Merritt. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
(L-R) Amy Chang, Claire Bang and Christine Le of Berkeley at the Oakland march. They say they came to support women's equality by highlighting its intersection with other marginalized groups.
(L-R) Amy Chang, Claire Bang and Christine Le of Berkeley at the Oakland Women's March. They say they came to support women's equality by highlighting its intersection with other marginalized groups. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
Adrianna JeanPierre of Oakland (L) at the Oakland march. She says she hopes to bring women of color to the forefront of the movement by teaching them to know their rights and of the importance of voting.
Adrianna JeanPierre of Oakland (L) at the Oakland Women's March. She says she hopes to bring women of color to the forefront of the movement by teaching them to know their rights and of the importance of voting. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
Eric Wities of Oakland and his husky Kolch give out tea at the Oakland's Women's March.
Eric Wities of Oakland and his husky Kolch give out tea at the Oakland's Women's March. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
(L-R) Rigo Machado and Kyle Lakatos of Oakland at the Oakland Women's March. They say they've been working together for social justice since they went to high school together. 'We're here to fight for everyone's rights,' Lakatos said.
(L-R) Rigo Machado and Kyle Lakatos of Oakland at the Oakland Women's March. They say they've been working together for social justice since they went to high school together. 'We're here to fight for everyone's rights,' Lakatos said. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
One of many expressive signs at the Oakland Women's March.
One of many expressive signs at the Oakland Women's March. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
(L-R) Ashlyn Ferhart, 8; Sage White, 9; Poppy Henderson, 8; and Morgan Olsen, 9, all from West Marin, hold signs at the Oakland Women's March. The Power of Kindness sign was inspired by a song of the same name by MaMuse.
(L-R) Ashleyn Ferhart, 8; Sage White, 9; Poppy Henderson, 8; and Morgan Olsen, 9, all from West Marin, hold signs at the Oakland Women's March. The Power of Kindness sign was inspired by a song of the same name by MaMuse. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
Amy Shelton of San Francisco at the Oakland Women's March. She says she planned to go to both Oakland and San Francisco marches, as she did last year. She's concerned about fractions within the women's march movement, and says as a Jewish woman, she supports her Muslim sisters and hopes for unity in the face of momentous challenges facing women over the last year.
Amy Shelton of San Francisco at the Oakland Women's March. She says she planned to go to both Oakland and San Francisco marches, as she did last year. She's concerned about fractions within the women's march movement, and says as a Jewish woman, she supports her Muslim sisters and hopes for unity in the face of momentous challenges facing women over the last year. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)

San Jose

Two of the many kids at the San Jose Women's March. In its third year, the women's marches are still filled with anti-Trump messages.
Two of the many kids at the San Jose Women's March. In its third year, the women's marches are still filled with anti-Trump messages. (Monica Samayoa/KQED)
Emily Munoz and Michelle Nguyen in front of San Jose City Hall for the Women's March. They say they came to support all women and those who are underrepresented to have equal rights. Nguyen says it’s a great opportunity to come out and stand with other women.
Emily Munoz and Michelle Nguyen in front of San Jose City Hall for the Women's March. They say they came to support all women and those who are underrepresented to have equal rights. Nguyen says it’s a great opportunity to come out and stand with other women. (Monica Samayoa/KQED)
A woman carries a sign at the San Jose Women's March with a familiar Spanish rallying cry which reads, 'We are the cry of those who no longer have a voice.'
A woman carries a sign at the San Jose Women's March with a familiar Spanish rallying cry which reads, 'We are the cry of those who no longer have a voice.' (Monica Samayoa/KQED)
A marcher carries a sign with a Martin Luther King Jr. quote during the San Jose Women's March.
A marcher carries a sign with a Martin Luther King Jr. quote during the San Jose Women's March. (Monica Samayoa/KQED)

San Francisco

Thousands fill Civic Center Plaza in front of City Hall for the third annual San Francisco Women's March.
Thousands fill Civic Center Plaza in front of City Hall for the third annual San Francisco Women's March. (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
'White women need to step down,' says Kimberly Magaña of Los Angeles about Women's March leaders. 'They need to build some kind of support system putting women of color and especially trans women to the front of the movement.' She's joined by Darlene Olmedo and Johanna Romero at the San Francisco Women's March.
'White women need to step down,' says Kimberly Magaña of Los Angeles about Women's March leaders. 'They need to build some kind of support system putting women of color and especially trans women to the front of the movement.' She's joined by Darlene Olmedo and Johanna Romero at the San Francisco Women's March. (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
Erica Yarborough, Shannon McCarty, and Sheryl Fuehrer are Stanford students at the San Francisco Women's March. Fuehrer is thinking about the government shutdown: 'I think it's extremely sad and really goes against what both Republicans and Democrats want to see in our country right now.'
Erica Yarborough, Shannon McCarty, and Sheryl Fuehrer are Stanford students at the San Francisco Women's March. Fuehrer is thinking about the government shutdown: 'I think it's extremely sad and really goes against what both Republicans and Democrats want to see in our country right now.' (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
Thousands march down Market Street at the San Francisco Women's March. Some cheers: 'Dump Trump' and 'This is what democracy looks like.'
Thousands march down Market Street at the San Francisco Women's March. Some cheers: 'Dump Trump' and 'This is what democracy looks like.' (Caroline Champlin/KQED)

Sacramento

Chico

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