PHOTOS: Pussy Hats and Protest Signs Fill Streets at Bay Area Women's Marches

Amanda Hammond stands in front of City Hall in San Francisco awaiting the begin of the 2018 Women's March. She hopes to continue to "support the movement" after marching in Washington D.C. last January. (Samantha Shanahan/KQED)

This post has been updated.

Across the Bay Area more than 100,000 people turned out for Women's Marches today. This comes one year after millions of women took to the streets nationwide in the wake of President Donald Trump's inauguration to rally for women’s rights.

Marches took place in big cities, like San Francisco and Oakland, but also smaller locations like Pacifica and Santa Rosa. A retirement community in Oakland even staged its own small march.

Oakland police say that city's march drew an estimated 40,000-50,000 participants, while organizers in San Francisco say that march drew at least 65,000 people.

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The focus for Women's March organizers shifted as they planned this year's anniversary events. Chandra Brooks, a member of the advisory committee of Women's March San Jose, says voter registration and getting more women elected to office is taking center stage.

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"Last year fueled a lot of women to run for political office or to take their seats on commissions, on boards," Brooks said. "Women are getting confident and saying, 'I can do that too, I can run.'"

Many of the speakers at the San Francisco march and rally implored women to become more politically active and to run for public office.

"We run, we vote, we get more people to run, we get more people to vote," said San Francisco Supervisor Hillary Ronen from the stage in front of City Hall.

She encouraged those present to register to vote and to support local measures including putting an initiative on the June ballot to create universal childcare in San Francisco. Other organizers at the San Francisco rally looked for support to reallocate hotel taxes to support homeless people, among other initiatives.

"Our theme this year is hear our vote, march for our future," said Ivonne Quiroz co-chair of the Oakland's Women's March, ahead of the march.


Several speakers at the San Francisco rally identified themselves as "MeToos," referring to the hashtag that sparked the nationwide conversation about sexual harassment and assault in politics and other workplaces. Sadalia King and Viviana Becerra of the We Said Enough campaign focused on sexual harassment at the California state Capitol were two of the featured speakers, and many of the signs in the crowd carried messages related to sexual harassment and assault.

One of the criticisms about the Women’s Marches last year was that they were not as diverse as they could be. Quiroz said the Oakland Women’s March is working toward inclusion, starting with a diverse leadership team.

In San Francisco, speakers included members of the Native American, LGBTQ, black, Latina, disabled, Islamic, Jewish and other minority communities. The attendees were also a diverse group of ages, races, religions, gender identities and sexual orientations.

Brooke Bullington of Palo Alto, previously worked on Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign and marched in Washington D.C. last year to express her discontent with the Trump administration. She marches in San Francisco because "Donald Trump is terrible and I want him to know it".
Brooke Bullington of Palo Alto, previously worked on Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign and marched in Washington D.C. last year to express her discontent with the Trump administration. She marches in San Francisco because "Donald Trump is terrible and I want him to know it". (Samantha Shanahan/KQED)
Protesters signs at San Francisco's Women's March emphasized the need for equality, peace, political action and even compared President Trump to Harry Potter's "He Who Should Not Be Named."
Protesters signs at San Francisco's Women's March emphasized the need for equality, peace, political action and even compared President Trump to Harry Potter's "He Who Should Not Be Named." (Samantha Shanahan/KQED)
People were passing out "Lock Him Up" signs at the San Francisco Women's March, referring to President Donald Trump.
People were passing out "Lock Him Up" signs at the San Francisco Women's March, referring to President Donald Trump. (Samantha Shanahan/KQED)
(L-R) Fatima Alhakim, Tammy Abdulnagi and Mariam Bin-bilal of San Francisco say they felt welcomed and empowered at the San Francisco Women's March being surrounded by so many "phenomenal women."
(L-R) Fatima Alhakim, Tammy Abdulnagi and Mariam Bin-bilal of San Francisco say they felt welcomed and empowered at the San Francisco Women's March being surrounded by so many "phenomenal women." (Ryan Levi/KQED)

San Francisco's Women's March was filled with young people making their voices heard through clever signs.
San Francisco's Women's March was filled with young people making their voices heard through clever signs. (Ryan Levi/KQED)
Simone Rickford drove from Sacramento to participate in the San Francisco Women's March. She says she wore the Colin Kaepernick jersey and a sign highlighting reproductive rights because "it's important to represent of multiple fronts."
Simone Rickford drove from Sacramento to participate in the San Francisco Women's March. She says she wore the Colin Kaepernick jersey and a sign highlighting reproductive rights because "it's important to represent of multiple fronts." (Ryan Levi/KQED)
"My idea of the future is genderless," says Tess Fabeck at the San Francisco Women's March.
"My idea of the future is genderless," says Tess Fabeck at the San Francisco Women's March. (Ryan Levi/KQED)
Protest pug spotted near Civic Center at San Francisco's Women's March. (Polly Stryker / KQED)
Signs at the San Francisco Women's March emphasized voting, petitions and political action, reflecting the nationwide goals of the march.
Signs at the San Francisco Women's March emphasized voting, petitions and political action, reflecting the nationwide goals of the march. (Ryan Levi/KQED)
Registering women to vote and encouraging them to vote and run for office was a major theme at the 2018 Women's March in San Francisco.
Registering women to vote and encouraging them to vote and run for office was a major theme at the 2018 Women's March in San Francisco. (Samantha Shanahan/KQED)
After two hours of speeches, thousands marched from City Hall, down Market Street to Embarcadero at the San Francisco Women's March on Jan. 20, 2018.
After two hours of speeches, thousands marched from City Hall, down Market Street to Embarcadero at the San Francisco Women's March on Jan. 20, 2018. (Ryan Levi/KQED)
This sign was a crowd favorite as many marchers going down Market Street as part of the San Francisco Women's March pulled over to take a picture or compliment its creator.
This sign was a crowd favorite as many marchers going down Market Street as part of the San Francisco Women's March pulled over to take a picture or compliment its creator. (Ryan Levi/KQED)
Daniel Johnson of San Francisco says he dressed as the Statue of Liberty for the Women's March in San Francisco because, "It's a pretty sad time for the Statue of Liberty," specifically mentioning Dreamers and recipients of Temporary Protected Status.
Daniel Johnson of San Francisco says he dressed as the Statue of Liberty for the Women's March in San Francisco because, "It's a pretty sad time for the Statue of Liberty," specifically mentioning Dreamers and recipients of Temporary Protected Status. (Ryan Levi/KQED)

Kay Bargmann, of Brentwood, is at the Oakland Women's March with her husband. She says President Trump is "undermining the free press, undermining the justice system, and doing his best to undermine the investigations."
Kay Bargmann, of Brentwood, is at the Oakland Women's March with her husband. She says President Trump is "undermining the free press, undermining the justice system, and doing his best to undermine the investigations." (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
Cora Tivol and Keely Shaller are at the Oakland Women's March with their parents.
Cora Tivol and Keely Shaller are at the Oakland Women's March with their parents. (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
Mari Ana Flores (right) is at the Oakland Woman's March as a student of a St. Mary's College class called "Protest, Parade and Pop Music." She says the focus of class last week was Black Lives Matter, next week is Chicano rights, and this week is women.
Mari Ana Flores (right) is at the Oakland Woman's March as a student of a St. Mary's College class called "Protest, Parade and Pop Music." She says the focus of class last week was Black Lives Matter, next week is Chicano rights, and this week is women. (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
Crowds marching through downtown Oakland during the Women's March.
Crowds marching through downtown Oakland during the Women's March. (Nastia Voynovskaya/KQED)
Thorild Urdal is a Norwegian citizen who has lived in Oakland for more than 30 years. Even though she can't vote in American elections she came to the Oakland Women's March because she still has the power to "educate and agitate."
Thorild Urdal is a Norwegian citizen who has lived in Oakland for more than 30 years. Even though she can't vote in American elections she came to the Oakland Women's March because she still has the power to "educate and agitate." (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
Jan Gliozzo (left) marching with her daughter Nina Gliozzo and friend Naome Nankin in Oakland. “A president that’s crazy. How many years has it been since I’ve taken to the streets? This is ridiculous,” says Jan. (Nastia Voynovskaya / KQED Arts)
“We celebrate women,” says lanae Coleman, age 10 at the Oakland Women's March. (Nastia Voynovskaya / KQED Arts)
From Oakland's @WomensMarch2018, Sofia Ghafari makes her point very clear: “feminism is important.” (Nastia Voynovskaya / KQED Arts)
"There’s a lot to be done and we gotta recognize the interlocking systems of oppression and do what we can to elevate all the struggles and create a world that’s equitable and just,” says Lauren Phipps (left). (Nastia Voynovskya / KQED Arts)
Jennifer Chambers (far right) of Alameda with her fellow handmaids at the Women's March in Oakland.
Jennifer Chambers (far right) of Alameda with her fellow handmaids at the Women's March in Oakland. (Caroline Champlin/KQED)
Maxine Hubbard-Cole was one of almost 60 residents of the Oakland senior living facility Piedmont Gardens in Oakland who staged their own short Women's March on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018.
Maxine Hubbard-Cole was one of almost 60 residents of the Oakland senior living facility Piedmont Gardens in Oakland who staged their own short Women's March on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018. (John Campbell)
Sylvia Levy marched with almost 60 other residents of the Piedmont Gardens senior living facility in Oakland.
Sylvia Levy marched with almost 60 other residents of the Piedmont Gardens senior living facility in Oakland. (Wendy Williams)
In addition to signs, many people came to Women's Marches in full costume, like this couple in Santa Rosa.
In addition to signs, many people came to Women's Marches in full costume, like this couple in Santa Rosa. (Liz Seward)
“I just... there’s so much terrible policy, terrible behavior, terrible choices in the cabinet... it’s overwhelming, the amount of disgustingness,” says Kerri Futch of Sebastopol at the Women's March in Santa Rosa. (Gabe Meline / KQED Arts) (Gabe Meline / KQED Arts)
“It just a moment where we’re breaking free, women, once and for all. And I don’t want *anyone* to be left behind. That’s the sentiment here: ‘Girl, give a shout.’” -- Kate Mazer of Santa Rosa. (Gabe Meline / KQED Arts)
“This is Frank Tracy, the bravest man in the park, because he put a lady hat on top of a man hat! He lifted up the lady!” -- Norma Baumsteiger at the Women's March in Santa Rosa (Gabe Meline / KQED Arts)
Karen Corpron, from Gilroy, and her baby at the San Jose Women's March. Karen's baby was born this time last year.
Karen Corpron, from Gilroy, and her baby at the San Jose Women's March. Karen's baby was born this time last year. (Penny Nelson/KQED)
 San Francisco City Hall is lit up pink at night on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018. Earlier in the day, tens of thousands of women gathered in front of City Hall and marched down Market Street as part of the 2018 Women's March.
San Francisco City Hall is lit up pink at night on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018. Earlier in the day, tens of thousands of women gathered in front of City Hall and marched down Market Street as part of the 2018 Women's March. (Raquel Maria Dillon/KQED)

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