A protester carries a shield in Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park during a rally demonstrating against the far right in Berkeley on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. Sheraz Sadiq/KQED
A protester carries a shield in Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park during a rally demonstrating against the far right in Berkeley on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)

PHOTOS: Violence and Defiance Mark Berkeley Protest of Far Right

PHOTOS: Violence and Defiance Mark Berkeley Protest of Far Right

More than 3,000 people marched through the streets of Berkeley on Sunday, toting signs reading “Not in our town,” playing music and chanting, “No hate, no fear,” to protest against plans for a far-right rally -- though its organizer asked supporters not to turn up.

The festive but defiant crowd was mostly peaceful until the early afternoon, when skirmishes broke out between black-clad anti-fascist protesters and a few far-right supporters at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park, where marchers had gathered.

People hit the streets to protest the “No to Marxism in America” rally planned for MLK Civic Center Park. The rally had been expected to draw white supremacist and nationalist groups, but only a few far-right supporters turned out.

In the crowd were a range of people, including anti-fascists, a Holocaust survivor, medics, musical protesters, Berkeley resident and comedian W. Kamau Bell, and supporters of President Trump.

The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. The organizer of that rally, Patriot Prayer founder Joey Gibson, came to the Berkeley protest, where he was chased from the area.

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Here are photos of some of the action on Sunday.

W. Kamau Bell speaks to a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Berkeley's Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park. (Bert Johnson/KQED)
Protesters confront a woman in Berkeley, calling her a "Nazi," during a rally demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)
A masked anti-fascist protester runs as smoke bombs are set off during clashes between far-right supporters and leftists. (Bert Johnson/KQED)
A protest against a far-right rally gathers near UC Berkeley on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)
This spent ordnance was found on a street in Berkeley after far-right members of Patriot Prayer and anti-fascist protesters clashed on Allston Way on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Bert Johnson/KQED)
Marco Gutierrez, a Donald Trump supporter, argues about immigration issues with a crowd of people protesting the far right in Berkeley on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Devin Katayama/KQED)
Protesters gather at Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center Park in Berkeley to demonstrate against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)
Berkeley police stand on the lawn next to Berkeley City Hall as they are confronted by protesters demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)
Police lead a man away in handcuffs after clashes between far-right supporters and anti-fascist protesters. (Bert Johnson/KQED)
"Since Charlottesville, it became clear to a huge number of people that Nazis and fascists were going to be coming to Berkeley. So showing up was mandatory, showing up was the only way to shut them down. We have a chant, we want peace in our parks, no to Nazis, yes to Marx!" said Isobel White, a spokeswoman for Groucho Marxists Against Hate and White Supremacy. She joined the protests in Berkeley on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)
A member of Struggalo Circus talks to a fellow protester in downtown Berkeley. The group combines anti-racist politics with Juggalo culture. (Bert Johnson/KQED)
People chant "Cops and Klan! Hand in hand!" during a standoff between protesters and police in Berkeley on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Bert Johnson/KQED)
Protesters rally outside Berkeley City Hall demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (Sheraz Shadiq/KQED)
Ben Stern, a 95-year-old survivor of the Holocaust (center, in cap and blue shirt), leads a march of Jewish activists in Berkeley to protest against far-right activities in that city. Stern had nine siblings, and all but one died in the Holocaust. “They’ll be marching in front of me, in my mind,” he said. (Eli Wirtschafter/KQED)
Apparently in response to the far-right "No to Marxism' rally, many people at the Berkeley protest donned Groucho Marx gear on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Dan Brekke/KQED)
John Connor, a second-year resident at San Francisco General Hospital, attended the Berkeley protests, where he said he treated five people who'd been sprayed with pepper spray. "I believe it's important to confront Nazis and white supremacists directly, show them they're not welcome in the Bay Area. And as a medic, I'm here to support the counterprotesters by providing water and first aid," he said. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)
Protesters descended on the streets of Berkeley demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (Dan Brekke/KQED)
Protesters descended on the streets of Berkeley demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (Dan Brekke/KQED)
Protesters descended on the streets of Berkeley demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (John Sepulvado/KQED)
Demonstrators hold signs at Oxford and Center streets in Berkeley on Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)
A group of musicians protest on the streets of Berkeley, demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED )
Protesters descended on the streets of Berkeley demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (John Sepulvado/KQED)
Protesters descended on the streets of Berkeley demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (John Sepulvado/KQED)
Protesters descended on the streets of Berkeley demonstrating against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. The protests come a day after thousands turned out to demonstrate against a far-right rally in San Francisco that was twice relocated and then canceled before it began. (John Sepulvado/KQED)
"We should make a monument to him (Trump), leave it out for the birds to poo on," says John Seabury, an illustrator who made this poster for today's protest. (Erika Aguilar/KQED)
A banner with the words, "Berkeley Stands United Against Hate," hangs on the building of Berkeley City Hall during a rally against the far right on Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017. (Sheraz Sadiq/KQED)

KQED's Carly Severn, John Sepulvado, Eli Wirtschafter, Erika Aguilar, Devin Katayama and Sheraz Sadiq contributed to the post.

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