San Francisco’s Women’s March began at the Civic Center Plaza in San Francisco on Jan. 21, 2017. Even with looming clouds and rain thousands joined in the march down Market St. Brittany Hosea-Small/KQED
San Francisco’s Women’s March began at the Civic Center Plaza in San Francisco on Jan. 21, 2017. Even with looming clouds and rain thousands joined in the march down Market St. (Brittany Hosea-Small/KQED)

Protesters Gather Across Bay Area and Sacramento for Women's Marches Against Trump

Protesters Gather Across Bay Area and Sacramento for Women's Marches Against Trump

We will update this post as more information is available.

Updated at 7:20 p.m.

Huge crowds protested at Women's March demonstrations in Oakland, San Jose, Sacramento and San Francisco Saturday for a second day of actions against President Donald Trump and his administration.

The demonstrations paralleled the large nationwide protests and the massive Women's March on Washington, which drew an estimated 500,000 people to rally against the Trump administration's agenda, particularly on issues of women's rights.

Today's Women's Marches follow Friday protests across the nation and in the Bay Area after Trump's inauguration.

Thousands of people poured into Civic Center Plaza for the San Francisco Women's March.
Thousands of people poured into Civic Center Plaza for the San Francisco Women's March. (Lisa Pickoff-White)

The Women's March in San Francisco drew tens of thousands of demonstrators to Civic Center Plaza in the afternoon, followed by a march on Market Street through rain and wind that began after 4:30 p.m. The march was still going strong as of 7 p.m.

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Protesters chanted, "Racist, sexist, anti-gay. Donald Trump go away," "Hear our voice" and "My body, my choice."

Isabel Martinez, a ninth grader at Gateway High School in San Francisco, watched the march from the sidewalk. After talking about social movements in school, Martinez chose to come out to the march and participate.

“I don’t think Donald Trump has a lot of respect for women, coming out here gives me a chance to share what I have to say,” Martinez said.

Nicole Barnes chanted with other protesters as she carried a candle during the march.

“We are not invisible and nobody is going to speak for us,” Barnes said. “We have a voice, we’ve had it the whole time.”

A separate demonstration against abortion took place at Civic Center shortly after 12 p.m. followed by a march. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that thousands turned out at City Hall for the 13th annual Walk for Life West Coast. It was a protest that was scheduled well before the presidential election was decided.

Thousands of people crowd Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland during the Women’s March rally on Jan.21, 2017.
Thousands of people crowd Frank Ogawa Plaza in Oakland during the Women’s March rally on Jan.21, 2017. (Brittany Hosea-Small)

In Oakland, thousands gathered at Madison Park at 11 a.m. for a march to City Hall in downtown, according to KQED's Devin Katayama.

Protesters carried signs reading, "Girls can fight" and "Nasty woman," a reference to comments Donald Trump made about Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton during the presidential campaign.

About 60,000 people packed into Frank Ogawa Plaza downtown, which was at near capacity at about 1:30 p.m., according to Oakland officials.

“It’s really important to feel a sense of security and safety, and I think by a bunch of people coming out here should to do that," said Hayward resident Kelsey Shiell at the Oakland march. "It really creates that community."

"A lot of my friends, especially my friends that are girls, feel like he’s sending the wrong message to girls of a young age like us," 12-year-old Mila Matos of Berkeley said.

The mood in Oakland was described as happy, and demonstrators said the march was a sign of unity designed to send a political message, Katayama said.

The Oakland Police Department said the protest and march was peaceful and that there were no arrests. Demonstrators left protest signs inside the 19th Street BART station after the march. One read, "Nasty women get shit done and bow to no one." Another read, "Please don't go back to sleep."

Thousands of demonstrators marched down the Capitol Mall during the Sacramento Women's March on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. The march culminated with a rally on the steps of the Capitol Building, with speakers, musicians and poetry performances.
Thousands of demonstrators marched down the Capitol Mall during the Sacramento Women's March on Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017. The march culminated with a rally on the steps of the Capitol Building, with speakers, musicians and poetry performances. (Bert Johnson/KQED)

In Sacramento, thousands began marching shortly after 11 a.m. from Southside Park to the state Capitol building where there will be speakers and a rally, according to KQED's Katie Orr.

Protesters carried signs reading, "I'm with her" with arrows pointing toward other women in the crowd. Another sign read, "Let's talk about the elephant in my uterus," referring to the Republican party.

The Sacramento protest was peaceful, upbeat and communal as demonstrators marched shoulder to shoulder, according to KQED's Bert Johnson, who tweeted from the scene.

Sacramento resident Linda Hsu marched with fellow members of the group Active Sacramento Lesbians. "Lesbians are the best feminists," she said, and shouted, "We love you all!" to other marchers.

In San Jose, thousands gathered at City Hall for a march to Cesar Chavez Plaza. A San Jose Police Department spokesman estimated the march at about 25,000 people.

Pragna Tantravahi, 20, is a De Anza College student and Fremont resident. She said the San Jose Women's March is the first protest she's attended.

"Equal pay and women's maternity leave is still a huge problem that we're still fighting for, and I think under a Trump presidency, that's going to be much harder to fight for," Tantravahi said.

Bert Johnson, Devin Katayama, Queena Kim, and Tara Siler contributed to this report.