Bay Area Voters Approve Affordable Housing Measures, Mostly by Wide Margins

A poll worker hands out 'I Voted' stickers. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

This post has been updated with more current results.

The dire need for more affordable housing in cities like San Francisco wasn't a huge talking point in the presidential election. However, in the pricey Bay Area, the issue was front and center on a number of local ballots. Voters are embracing  local measures that promise to create new housing for low- and middle-income residents.

Here's a brief rundown:

In Alameda County, early vote tallies pointed to large approval of Measure A1, a $580 million housing bond. And that lead held up when the final vote came in, as voters approved the measure 72-28 percent. The general obligation bonds will finance the construction and rehabilitation of affordable rental units, loans for moderate-income homebuyers and upgrades to existing low-income housing. The measure easily got the two-thirds approval needed to pass.

In Berkeley, residents voted heavily in favor of Measure Z1, passing it by 83-17 percent. The measure gives the city the green light to create 500 new below-market-rate units. Voter approval is required by the California Constitution for the new projects to go forward.

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In the meantime, Oaklanders embraced Measure KK, a $600 million infrastructure bond earmarking $100 million for affordable housing. A citizen oversight committee would audit all spending from the measure. The measure passed 82-18 percent, as of Wednesday afternoon.

In Santa Clara County, Measure A barely passed, with 67 percent approval. The measure requires two-thirds approval to pass. The sweeping affordable housing bond measure would allow the county to borrow up to $950 million to create and preserve an estimated 5,000 affordable housing units.

San Mateo County voters voted handily in favor of Measure K, which extends a half-cent sales tax through 2043. The measure has nearly 70 percent voter approval, as of Wednesday afternoon. The Board of Supervisors placed K on the ballot to help fund affordable housing for families, seniors, veterans and people with disabilities.

And in San Francisco, voters approved Proposition C, a measure that would allow the city to repurpose $261 million in unused general obligation bond funding that voters originally approved in 1992 for seismic upgrades. Under Proposition C, bonds would be used to acquire and rehabilitate multi-unit properties and convert them to permanently affordable housing. The local measure got 76 percent approval, as of Wednesday afternoon.

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