What Happens When Parents Decide to Opt-Out of Standardized Tests?

Save ArticleSave Article

Failed to save article

Please try again

Ten years into the No Child Left Behind accountability standards, the backlash is gaining momentum. In New York, a growing number of parents are discovering that, as state standardized tests become a prominent part of the curriculum, their children are losing interest in school. This discovery is leading many of them to opt out of the tests altogether. But if a critical mass of parents decide that they don't buy into state mandated assessments, what will happen to the school system? Robert Kolker explores the consequences in New York City in a recent article for New York Magazine.

"No real anti-testing resistance movement ever gained traction until last spring, when the state introduced revamped ELA and math tests that were so much harder than what came before that a vast majority of students failed," Kolker writes.

The Opt-OutersMore than a year before 7-year-old Oscar Mata was scheduled to take his first major standardized test, his parents received word from his school that he was failing. The Department of Education calls it a Promotion in Doubt letter-a well-intentioned, if blunt, method used to get families to take notice of gaps in a student's skills.

Embedly Powered

via Nymag

Sponsored