The Iraq Invasion, 10 Years Later

at 9:00 AM
 (Courtesy U.S. Army)

Tuesday marks the 10th anniversary of the United States' invasion of Iraq. Former president George W. Bush justified the 2003 invasion on the grounds that then-Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction. That assertion proved to be incorrect, as did the administration's initial prediction of a brief conflict. The third-longest war in U.S. history has claimed the lives of at least 190,000 people -- including 4,488 U.S. service members and 134,000 Iraqi civilians -- and has cost more than $2 trillion, according to a new Brown University study. We look back at the Iraq invasion and discuss the legacy of the war.

Show Highlights

Guests:

Phyllis Bennis, fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies and author of books including "Ending the U.S. War in Afghanistan: A Primer"

Rajiv Chandrasekaran, senior correspondent for The Washington Post and author of "Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq's Green Zone" and "Little America: The War Within the War for Afghanistan"

Thomas Donnelly, director of the Marilyn Ware Center for Security Studies at the American Enterprise Institute and author of books including "Lessons for a Long War: How America Can Win on New Battlefields" and "Operation Iraqi Freedom: A Strategic Assessment"

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