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How Vulnerable Is Our Power Grid?

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Electrical contractors performing maintenance on electrical grid in a sky bucket. (©Studio One-One via Getty Images)

Duke Energy said it hoped to fully restore power to North Carolina residents by Wednesday night, after shootings at two electrical substations over the weekend shuttered schools and businesses and left thousands of people in the dark. The shootings, which investigators are calling deliberate, are for Californians bringing to mind the 2013 sniper attacks on a PG&E substation near San Jose that led federal regulators to adopt new rules to protect critical facilities. We’ll look at how vulnerable our state and national power grid is to physical attack, and why.

Guests:

Jon Wellinghoff, CEO and founder, GridPolicy Consulting; former chair, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission under President Obama

Juliette Kayyem, faculty chair of the Homeland Security and Security and Global Health Projects, Harvard Kennedy School; former assistant secretary, Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Homeland Security under President Obama; author, "The Devil Never Sleeps: Learning to Live in an Age of Disasters"

Dan Brekke, editor and reporter, KQED News

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