How the English Language Is Changing 'Because Internet'

52 min
at 10:00 AM
 (iStock)

Ever had a joke or sarcastic comment go awry when sending a text message? According to author and linguist Gretchen McCulloch, the challenge of conveying subtle differences in tone over short, written messages is driving rapid change in the English language. Her new book, "Because Internet," answers questions like why young people might read periods as passive aggressive, or why "lol" rarely means "laugh out loud" in the literal sense. We talk to McCulloch about the internet's dramatic effect on language, and take your questions about emojis, memes and the ways we communicate digitally.

Guests:

Gretchen McCulloch, linguist; author, "Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language"; co-host, "Lingthusiasm" podcast

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