'Uninhabitable Earth' Explores a Looming Climate Catastrophe

52 min
at 9:00 AM
Severe erosion of the permafrost tundra threatens a school at the climate change affected Yupik Eskimo village of Napakiak on the Yukon Delta in Alaska on April 18, 2019.  (Photo: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

"It is worse, much worse, than you think," begins David Wallace-Wells's new book on the impact of climate change. From there, Wallace-Wells presents the scope of global warming's challenge to human civilization, from feeding 50% more people with half the amount of productive land to whole cities that will be unlivable in the summer. Wallace-Wells joins Forum to talk about the book and about why he thinks the science shows it's time for "climate panic."

Guests:

David Wallace-Wells, author,"The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming"; columnist and deputy editor, New York magazine; National Fellow at the New America Foundation

Cherilyn Parsons, executive director, Bay Area Book Festival

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