San Mateo County

Kevin Mullin (D)55.4%
108,042 votes
David Canepa (D)44.5%
86,761 votes
Race called at 5:28 PM PT on November 12, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

U.S. House of Representatives, District 16

Top candidate wins seat.

Anna Eshoo (D)(incumbent)57.7%
139,141 votes
Rishi Kumar (D)42.2%
101,700 votes
Race called at 11:28 AM PT on November 10, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 19

Top candidate wins seat.

Phil Ting (D)(incumbent)81%
133,311 votes
Karsten Weide (R)18.9%
31,248 votes
Race called at 9:57 PM PT on November 8, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 21

Top candidate wins seat.

Diane Papan (D)72.4%
94,632 votes
Giselle Hale (D)27.5%
35,994 votes
Race called at 5:05 PM PT on November 12, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

State Assembly, District 23

Top candidate wins seat.

Marc Berman (D)(incumbent)73.4%
124,523 votes
Tim Dec (R)26.5%
45,123 votes
Race called at 9:58 PM PT on November 8, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.
 

U.S. House of Representatives, District 15

Rep. Jackie Speier's retirement at the end of this term has created the first open House seat in the Bay Area since 2014. District 15 covers most of San Mateo County and parts of San Francisco. Democratic state Assemblymember Kevin Mullin finished first in the primary election, with 41% of the vote, ahead of San Mateo County Supervisor David Canepa, also a Democrat, who received 24% of the vote.

Top candidate wins seat.

Kevin Mullin (D)55.4%
108,042 votes
David Canepa (D)44.5%
86,761 votes
Race called at 5:28 PM PT on November 12, 2022
99% of votes countedAssociated Press
This percentage is an Associated Press estimate of how much of the vote in an election has been counted. It is informed by turnout in recent elections, details on votes cast in advance and – after polls close – early returns. The estimate may fluctuate as election officials report additional results and AP learns more about how many voters have cast a ballot.

Candidates

Kevin Mullin
California State Assemblymember
DEMOCRAT
David Canepa
San Mateo County Supervisor
DEMOCRAT
 

Positions on Key Issues
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.

Health Care

What policies do you support to improve health care quality and access?

Mullin, as a state Assembly member, supported legislation to expand Medi-Cal coverage to undocumented immigrants over the age of 49, and voted for a bill earlier this year to move California toward a single-payer health care system. He says he’ll support similar laws in Congress, while allowing nonprofit providers, like Kaiser Permanente, to operate during any transition to government-run care.

Canepa is making Seton Medical Center a focal point of his campaign: He was born in the hospital, fought as a supervisor to save it from bankruptcy and helped transition the facility into a treatment center for COVID-19 patients. Canepa also says he will support a Medicare for All plan in Congress to guarantee health care coverage to all Americans.

Housing

What will you do to improve housing affordability?

Mullin points to a package of statewide laws he wrote in 2017 that have made it easier for school districts to build teacher housing and that allow local governments to create affordable housing authorities, which can set aside property tax dollars to build affordable housing projects. In Congress, Mullin pledges he will work to secure a significant amount of federal funding for his district.

Canepa says the pandemic caused an affordable housing “crisis on steroids” for the county. He touts his role as a county supervisor in working to allocate over $100 million for affordable housing, including more than $12 million for the Midway Village project in Daly City, which he says will be the largest affordable housing project in the history of the county.

Education

What is your plan for supporting students and learners at all stages of life?

Mullin notes his support of California’s new universal transitional kindergarten program, which will spend $2.7 billion to provide preschool education to every 4-year-old in the state. In Congress, he vows to push for funding to expand apprenticeship programs in the construction trades, along with skills-training programs to help workers shift from industrial jobs to employment in the clean energy sector.

Canepa touts his backing of a $2 million grant to the San Mateo County Community College District to cover tuition for 500 new students. He says in Congress he will push for more funding for after-school programs, community colleges and early childhood education.

 

Your Questions, Answered

We brought your questions to the candidates and got their answers to the questions most important to you.

Valerie in San Bruno asks:

I am a senior. Closest SamTrans is about a mile away. Poor public transportation in Monte Verde in San Bruno. Skyline Blvd and College should have a stop that can take you to El Camino or north or south. What can be done to improve public transportation for San Bruno?

Mullin says "As a former member of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, I am passionate about seeking funding to improve the Bay Area’s crucial transportation network - which has huge needs, but also incredible opportunities to transform itself into a truly world-class, integrated nine-county system, including the electrification of Caltrain. I advocated for and delivered major Transportation Infrastructure Funding to the Peninsula during my 10 years in the California State Assembly. In Congress, I will fight to ensure that CA-15 is a major recipient of the Federal Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal investments so that we can expand access to low-carbon public transportation, including creating more public transportation for communities like San Bruno."

Key Supporters
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

 

County Supervisor, District 2

San Mateo-Foster City School District trustee Noelia Corzo and Belmont Councilmember Charles Stone are running to represent San Mateo, Foster City and Belmont on the county Board of Supervisors, in a seat currently held by Supervisor Carole Bloom. In the June primary, Stone received 45% of the vote, while Corzo received 42%.

Candidates

Noelia Corzo
San Mateo-Foster City School District, Board Trustee
DEMOCRAT
Charles Stone
Belmont Councilmember
DEMOCRAT
 

Positions on Key Issues
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.

Cost of Living

What will you do to advance economic equity and bring down the cost of living?

Corzo says she’s been a renter all her life and has experienced homelessness. She supports setting a minimum wage for the unincorporated areas of the county — but argues that “we can’t just stop there.” As supervisor, she wants to incentivize and push cities in the county to raise their own minimum wages. She also supports expanding The Big Lift, a county program to boost third-grade reading proficiency through investments in preschool and summer learning.

Stone also supports raising the county minimum wage. As mayor of Belmont, Stone voted in 2017 to incrementally increase the city’s minimum wage, which reached $15.00 by 2020. He has vowed to expand county recreation programs and boost funding for health care services.

Housing

What is your vision for housing development in the county?

Corzo is calling for the county to invest more money in affordable housing. In 2016, she volunteered for the campaign to pass Measure Q, an unsuccessful ballot measure to enact rent control in the city of San Mateo. More recently, she has worked with Faith in Action, a nonprofit that advocates for tenants.

Stone says the county needs to “get serious about densifying the transit corridor along the El Camino Real and along the Caltrain line,” with a focus on building more affordable housing. He has touted his role in helping Belmont meet its state-mandated requirements for the development of new housing.

Climate

San Mateo faces the greatest risks from sea-level rise of any Bay Area county. What climate policies would you support as supervisor?

Corzo acknowledges that San Mateo is “uniquely vulnerable when it comes to sea-level rise” and says “folks that are most directly affected are usually low-income people of color who do not have a voice in terms of what their needs are.” She opposes the express lane expansion on Highway 101 and says the government should be focusing instead on investments in public transportation. As supervisor, she would advocate for more resources for firefighters and conservationists in the county’s rural areas.

Stone touts his work passing local building codes in Belmont that require most new apartment buildings to be all-electric, surpassing state energy-use mandates. As supervisor, he wants to pursue similar initiatives through the county’s Office of Sustainability. And he thinks the county can become a leader in climate policy by providing its cities with legislative templates, because “all of our local cities are run by folks who are overworked and underpaid.”

Key Supporters
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

  • For Noelia Corzo

  • Rick Bonilla, deputy mayor, San Mateo
  • Amourence Lee, City Council member, San Mateo
  • California Nurses Association
  • San Mateo Elementary Teachers Association
  • For Charles Stone

  • Carole Groom, supervisor, San Mateo County
  • Kevin Mullin, state Assembly member
  • Jackie Speier, U.S representative
  • San Mateo County Labor Council
 

County Supervisor, District 3

Menlo Park Councilmember Ray Mueller and San Carlos Councilmember Laura Parmer-Lohan face off in a runoff for a seat covering San Mateo County’s coastal region, a district currently represented by outgoing Supervisor Don Horsley. In the June primary, Mueller finished with 34% of the vote, ahead of Parmer-Lohan’s 31%.

Candidates

Laura Parmer-Lohan
San Carlos Councilmember
DEMOCRAT
Ray Mueller
Menlo Park Councilmember
DEMOCRAT
 

Positions on Key Issues
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.
Candidate summaries are based on interviews with the candidates, statements made at debates and public events and past news coverage.

Housing Affordability

What is your plan for making housing in the county more affordable?

Parmer-Lohan says that during her time on the San Carlos City Council she has witnessed a shift among residents, many of whom initially pushed for a construction moratorium and are now demanding more housing. She proposes that the county look to build on vacant land, such as the former site of Bay City Flowers in Half Moon Bay. “I think that could be a really great location to create affordable housing,” she says. Parmer-Lohan also says she will look to open more navigation centers in the county that offer supportive housing services for unhoused residents, like the one currently under construction in Redwood City.

Mueller touts his service on the board of directors of LifeMoves, a nonprofit that develops supportive housing and provides services to the unhoused. On the Menlo Park City Council, Mueller advocated for a community land trust that would allow residents of affordable housing to lease and eventually own their units, “and see a bit of equity from that housing.” He agrees with the need to develop affordable housing on vacant land, but warns that building on the Bay City Flowers site is “going to be about $21 million, it’s not cheap.”

Sheriff Oversight

What is your vision for law enforcement in the county? Would you support the establishment of a civilian oversight board for the Sheriff’s Office?

Parmer-Lohan says she is committed to creating a civilian oversight committee with an inspector general with subpoena power. “Many community members do not feel that ‘Protect and Serve’ applies to them,” she says. Parmer-Lohan touts her recent push for a $350,000 federal budget allocation to the Sheriff’s Office to to help train deputies to respond to mental health crises.

Mueller also supports the creation of an oversight committee, saying “I think it’s important going forward for the Sheriff’s Office to build trust with the community.” He wants to see law enforcement in the county walking beats and “actually interacting with community members.” Mueller touts his record, as council member, of working closely with local law enforcement. He specifically points to an ordinance he crafted in collaboration with the Menlo Park Police Department that limits its ability to cooperate with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Transportation

What is your plan to reduce traffic and improve public transportation for coastside residents?

Parmer-Lohan says reliable public transportation needs to extend south of Half Moon Bay. She also promises to improve bike and pedestrian safety and access in the district. “We need to make sure that our bike and pedestrian infrastructure is safe and motivates people to get out of their cars,” she says. She points to similar improvements she pushed for in San Carlos that resulted in more residents biking and walking.

Mueller is calling for more coastal transit shuttle options to help mitigate tourist traffic. He says the county should start planning for new ways to alleviate traffic on Highway 92 between Interstate 280 and Half Moon Bay, such as a gondola going over the hill. “We’re going to have to be creative, we’re going to have to think outside the box in that way,” he says.

Key Supporters
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

 

Measure V

Should the Menlo Park City Council be prohibited from rezoning or redesignating certain properties that were zoned and designated for single-family detached homes?

Passes with a majority vote. Read the full measure.

Yes Argument

Measure V gives voters more control over development in Menlo Park — specifically, the ability to protect single-family neighborhoods. City Council members should get the permission of residents before approving projects that could bring construction, traffic and crowding to these neighborhoods.

No Argument

Measure V would exacerbate racial and economic segregation and make it harder to develop affordable housing for teachers and working families in Menlo Park. The measure would also burden city taxpayers with ongoing legal costs because it potentially violates state and federal housing law.

Key Supporters

  • Menlo Balance
  • Peter Ohtaki, former mayor, Menlo Park
  • Chuck Bernstein, president, Menlo Park Fire Protection District
  • Henry Riggs, planning commissioner, Menlo Park Planning Commission

Key Opponents