Proposition 28

Should California guarantee that 1% of the amount funded for public education be set aside to fund music and the arts in every K-12 public school?

Proposition 28 would roughly double the amount of funding California gives schools for arts and music education, and it would send 30% of that money to schools serving low-income students. Voters would also be locking in that funding stream for the future since Proposition 28 requires that the annual amount be equal to, at minimum, 1% of the amount allocated for public education under Proposition 98, which sets minimum school-funding levels in the state budget. This money would be in addition to the existing minimum provided by Proposition 98, thus it would come out of the general fund.

Yes Argument

When it comes time to make budget cuts, public schools often cut the arts first. The result is that today most of California’s public school students are not getting a quality arts education, something that has proven to help keep kids engaged in school, increase attendance and improve learning. Right now 90% of elementary schools fail to provide high-quality arts programming, and the stats are similarly dismal at the middle and high school level. This would go a long way toward bringing back the arts and adding some joy into school learning environments.

No Argument

The state budget is flush now, but there is concern that if and when the economy contracts, the state will be locked into this funding for arts in schools, which may force cuts in other programs. Not being able to prioritize cuts in tough times deprives the state of flexibility which could create more harm if it means cuts in other areas targeting more essential needs.

Key Supporters
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

Key Opponents
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.
This list represents notable organizations and officials who have taken a position on the ballot measure, or who are funding the campaigns in support or in opposition. This list is not exhaustive, and may be updated.

  • N/A

Fundraising
Campaign finance data comes from the California Secretary of State’s office and our partners at Voter’s Edge.
Campaign finance data comes from the California Secretary of State’s office and our partners at Voter’s Edge.

Updated at 5:00 PM PT on Oct 27, 2022
Source: California Secretary of State
In Support
$12.9mTotal
Austin Beutner
$4.2m
California Teachers Association
$3.6m
Steve Ballmer
$1.5m
Fender Musical Instruments
$1.2m
Monica H. Rosenthal
$1.0m

In Opposition
$0Total
 

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