My Parents

at 3:30 AM

Have you ever had nightmares about something happening to you, but when it does happen it's not as bad as you thought? That's how it was for me when my parents split up. Maybe it was for the better, maybe it was for the worst; all I know is the change has gotten a lot easier than it was in the beginning.

It was the end of the first week of summer and I had just graduated fifth grade; we were celebrating with pizza. But ever since my parents had gotten home from work, there was a weird feeling in the air, lots of tension. After dinner, we watched a movie and had dessert. When our parents sat us down and told us they had an announcement, their faces were grim. My brother, Hudson, who was 8 at the time, picked up on the faces and freaked out.

Whenever their faces look sad with round, puppy-dog eyes, we know it's bad. We thought someone we knew died. Then, my mom, breaking the silence, said: "Guys, we are going to try living in separate houses." Then I went into a rage, screaming and sobbing at the top of my lungs. "No, you can't. No, no, no!" My brother only partly understood, and cried because I was crying. I flew down the stairs and locked myself in my room, not coming out all night. I couldn't believe this was happening to me. My parents, unhappy to be within 10 yards of each other, and having to deal with all the "comforting" comments, like "Oh, I'm so sorry about your parents," or "What can we do to make you feel better?" That might make someone else feel better, but it made be feel worse.

Later, we talked about it. I realized that it would be a change, but it might also be a good one. I'd rather live in two separate houses than have my parents argue all the time. There are also pros: two rooms, two beds with warm blankets, double living space to divide my stuff into, and happy parents. My mom has two floors of a nice Victorian house near my dad's, and my dad has the house I've lived in since I was born. My mom says it's only temporary, but I think it will be a while before another change.

Thinking back on it, I shouldn't have reacted that way to the separation. But I wouldn't go back in time to change it. It was my response, and everyone's different. I can only dream about things returning to the way they were before, but this whole experience has made me a stronger person. That's all I could ever hope for.

Sponsored

Sponsored

With a Perspective, I'm Lucy.

Volume
KQED Live
Live Stream
Log In ToPledge-Free Stream
LATEST NEWSCAST
KQED
NPR
Live Stream information currently unavailable.
Share
LATEST NEWSCAST
KQED
NPR
KQED Live

Live Stream

Live Stream information currently unavailable.