Impeachment Update, S.F. District Attorney Race, New State Poll

House Democrats Demand Documents and Answers in Impeachment Probe
On Friday, the three House committees leading the impeachment investigation demanded documents from Vice President Mike Pence about the White House’s dealings with Ukraine. A day earlier, those same committees interviewed Kurt Volker, a former special envoy to Ukraine, and discovered texts and documents showing that top State Department officials worked on getting a statement of support from Ukraine’s president to investigate Democratic presidential rival Joe Biden and his son, Hunter. Also this week, President Trump told reporters that China should investigate Biden and his son, and personally attacked congressman Adam Schiff (D-Burbank), whom he accused of helping write the whistleblower’s complaint that sparked the impeachment probe.  

Guests: 

  • Marisa Lagos, KQED politics and government correspondent
  • Ron Elving, NPR News senior editor and correspondent 

San Francisco DA Race
On Thursday, San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón announced his resignation to explore entering the race for district attorney in Los Angeles. Meanwhile, the race to elect a new DA in San Francisco is an open contest, with four candidates vying to be the city’s next top prosecutor. On Nov. 5, San Francisco voters will get to cast their ballots in that closely watched contest, as well as decide the fate of six local ballot measures..  

Guests: 

  • Leif Dautch, San Francisco district attorney candidate
  • Nancy Tung, San Francisco district attorney candidate

 New State Poll Reveals Voters’ Concerns and Anxieties
This week, the Public Policy Institute of California released a new poll gauging the mood of voters and their top concerns. For the first time, homelessness was cited as often as jobs and the economy as the most important issues facing the state. The poll also shows trouble for Kamala Harris, Democratic presidential candidate and California senator, whose support among likely voters in the state has slipped to just 8 percent. And for the first time since 2015, more than half of likely voters think the state is heading in the wrong direction.

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Guest: 

  •  Mark Baldassare, CEO and president, Public Policy Institute of California

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