San Francisco Journalist Threatens to Sue Over Police Raid of His Home

7 min
A freelance journalist whose home and office were raided by San Francisco police is threatening legal action against the department if his belongings are not returned. (Alex Emslie/KQED)

San Francisco Journalist Threatens to Sue Over Police Raid of His Home

A freelance journalist whose home and office were raided by San Francisco police is threatening legal action against the department if his belongings are not returned. We now know judges who signed the warrants were aware of his job, according to a San Francisco Supervisor. Police were investigating what they call an illegally leaked police report connected to the death of San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi.
Reporter: Sonja Hutson

Jury Hits Monsanto With $2 Billion in Roundup Damages

A third California court has found a connection between the weedkiller Roundup and cancer. In Alameda County, a jury has awarded more than $2 billion to an elderly couple who blames the agribusiness giant Monsanto for their disease.
Reporter: Molly Peterson

San Francisco Could Be First US City to Ban Facial Recognition by Police

San Francisco could be the first city in America to ban the use of facial recognition technology by police and other city agencies. The Board of Supervisors is scheduled to vote on the ordinance today.
Reporter: Rachael Myrow

Why Race Matters in Today's LAUSD School Board Election

There’s a runoff election today for the Los Angeles Unified School Board's District 5. Though 90 percent of District 5’s students are Latino, both the candidates in the race are white women. Jackie Goldberg and Heather Repenning rose to the top of a pool that included seven Latino hopefuls. Whoever the winner is will tip the demographics of the board to majority white: four out of the seven members will be Caucasian.
Guest: KPCC Education Reporter Kyle Stokes

These Asian American Progressives Want To Build A New Church Tradition

California is home to thousands of churches started by Asian American immigrants. For some younger members, these churches are too conservative. Progressive churches, typically with largely white congregations, aren’t always the right fit either. So, some Asian American Christians are creating their own space.
Reporter: Josie Hwang

Governor Newsom Grants Pardons to Cambodian Immigrants

Two Bay Area men who came as refugees from Cambodia in the 1980s were granted pardons Monday by Governor Gavin Newsom. The pardons should protect the men from deportation.
Reporter: Tyche Hendricks

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