Newsom Halts Executions, Opponents Call Move an Abuse of Power

11 min

Gov. Newsom Halts Executions; Opponents Call Move an Abuse of Power

Governor Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday that effectively halted the death penalty in California and closed the execution chamber at San Quentin state prison. He did this, in part, because of an approaching April deadline to sign lethal injection protocols to put people to death. There are 737 inmates on death row; 25 of them have exhausted their appeals and would have been eligible for execution. KQED's politics correspondent Marisa Lagos spoke with the governor about the move.
Guest: Gavin Newsom

Death Penalty Moratorium Elicits Varying Reactions

Newsom’s executive order declaring a moratorium on the death penalty sparked a range of responses at the Capitol.
Reporter: Katie Orr

Facebook's Deals With Some Tech Companies Under Criminal Investigation

Facebook’s data deals are now under a criminal investigation. Specifically, deals the social network made with with major tech companies that make smartphones and other tech devices. The New York Times reports a grand jury in New York has subpoenaed information from at least two companies who have been accused of entering partnerships with Facebook that gave them access to the personal information of hundreds of millions of users.
Guest: Rachael Myrow

Guess What, California? Now You Need to Prepare for Erupting Volcanoes

Earthquakes, wildfires, floods. Chances are, if you live in California, these environmental hazards are on your radar. What you might not know is that the risk of a volcano erupting is also very real. That's according to a recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey's California Volcano Observatory.
Reporter: Peter Arcuni

Investigators Find Southern California Edison to Blame for Thomas Fire

Ventura County Fire Department investigators are blaming power lines owned and operated by the region’s electrical utility for starting the deadly Thomas Fire in late 2017.
Reporter: Stephanie O'Neill

Trump Administration's Bid to Scuttle California's Sanctuary Laws Falls Flat in Court

The 9th Circuit Court of appeals appears likely to uphold California’s “Sanctuary State” law, that was passed in 2017 to protect undocumented residents.
Reporter: Julie Small

Trump Administration Stalls Plan to End Protection Status For Thousands

More than 6,000 people in California scheduled to lose their permit to live in the U.S. can remain in the country, for now. That's after the Trump administration agreed Tuesday to halt its plan to end Temporary Protected Status for people from Honduras and Nepal.
Reporter: Farida Jhabvala-Romero

Fiat-Chrysler Recalls Thousands of California Vehicles Deemed Super-Polluters

If you drive a Chrysler, Dodge or Jeep vehicle, you might have a date with the dealer in your future.
Reporter: Craig Miller

Uber Settles Lawsuit with California, Massachusetts Drivers

This week, Uber settled a six year lawsuit with California and Massachusetts drivers over how the ride hailing company classifies them. But the $20 million settlement is far less than drivers hoped for.
Reporter: Sam Harnett

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