Sunnyvale resident Nancy C. Silva expresses shock at the second goal by Brazil. "I'm heartbroken," she said. "We're still proud of our team, we're always here to support." Anne Wernikoff/KQED
Sunnyvale resident Nancy C. Silva expresses shock at the second goal by Brazil. "I'm heartbroken," she said. "We're still proud of our team, we're always here to support." (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)

PHOTOS: Mexico's Loss Against Brazil in the World Cup Doesn't Dampen Celebrations

PHOTOS: Mexico's Loss Against Brazil in the World Cup Doesn't Dampen Celebrations

2 min

More than 7,500 soccer fans showed up before dawn at Avaya Stadium in San Jose to watch Mexico take on Brazil in the World Cup.

Admission to sit on the grass and watch the game on the stadium's big screen was free. There were supporters of both teams but the Mexico fans were especially passionate -- they haven't seen their team get through the World Cup Round of 16 since 1986.

Jesus Rios was hoping for a win as something positive after a tumultuous national election in Mexico and continuing negative tension in the U.S.

"It would mean a lot, honestly, with everything that's been happening in the country, here and around the world," he said. "It would be a great victory in the sense of pride and just overall joy."

But Mexico came up short, losing to Brazil 2-0.

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Still, fans like Sam Cuellar, who drove up from Los Angeles with his family, said it was worth getting up at 5 a.m.

"It's soccer, somebody's gotta lose. No hard feelings, great time, great time. Look, Everybody's still happy, everybody's still happy. Sometimes you lose."

Despite her team's loss, Yolanda Garcia of San Jose said most of her family and friends are going to party, win or lose.

"I think most of us will take the day off," she said, laughing. "It's like independence day for us."

And she wasn't alone. The game was over by 9.a.m, and Mexico fans spilled out into the parking lot playing horns, dancing and waving flags. The party, as they say, went on.

Mexico fans invite Brazil fans to join in their reveling following the game. Natalia Miller, lower left, said the two countries' fan culture are similar. "We party if we lose, party if we win."
Mexico fans invite Brazil fans to join in their revelry following the game. Natalia Miller, lower right, said the two countries' fan cultures are similar. "We party if we lose, party if we win." (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
Mexican flags fly above a lively crowd. Following a 2-0 loss to Brazil, Mexico fans continued to celebrate their team with singing, cheering and a mosh pit. (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
A crowd of more than 7,500 came to watch the game at Avaya stadium in San Jose, with the vast majority supporting Mexico.
A crowd of more than 7,500 came to watch the game at Avaya Stadium in San Jose, with the vast majority supporting Mexico. (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
A Brazil fan sports a ring and a bracelet with the national colors while carrying a flag.
A Brazil fan sports a ring and a bracelet with the national colors while carrying a flag. (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
From left: Nicole Villegas, Juli Castro and Edilia Vidal of San Bruno react to the game, which remained 1-0 for the majority of the second half and was stressful for Mexico fans who desperately wanted to see their team move into the quarter finals. "I can feel my heart beating so fast," said Castro. "High anxiety for sure!"
From left: Nicole Villegas, Juli Castro and Edilia Vidal of San Bruno react to the game, which remained 1-0 for the majority of the second half and was stressful for Mexico fans who desperately wanted to see their team move into the quarter-finals. "I can feel my heart beating so fast," said Castro. "High anxiety for sure!" (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
Carla Leininger from Mountain View holds up a Brazilian flag while celebrating Neymar's goal. On her head she sports a crown saying "Brazil Hexa," a reference to the sixth world title that Brazil is currently vying for as they move into the quarter finals. "We're a little bit shocked with all the big teams that have gone home," she said. "Inside we are a little bit nervous."
Carla Leininger from Mountain View holds up a Brazilian flag while celebrating Neymar's goal. On her head she sports a crown saying "Brasil Hexa," a reference to the sixth world title that Brazil is currently vying for as they move into the quarter-finals. "We're a little bit shocked with all the big teams that have gone home," she said. "Inside we are a little bit nervous." (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
Fans crowded around both sides of the score board to watch the soccer match.
Fans crowded around both sides of the scoreboard to watch the soccer match. (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
Kevin Aquino, who traveled from Fremont to watch "Mexico win" with his friends, reacts to a the first blocked goal attempt.
Kevin Aquino, who traveled from Fremont to watch "Mexico win" with his friends, reacts to the first blocked goal attempt. (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
Alfredo Gonzalez and his son Angel, age 8, walk past the stadium gates wearing Aztec and Pancho Villa costumes. "We want to make sure we represent our team and show support, and this is a nice way to do it," he said. "It's not going to be easy, but other teams have done it and we're going to do it, too."
Alfredo Gonzalez and his son, Angel, age 8, walk past the stadium gates wearing Aztec and Pancho Villa costumes. "We want to make sure we represent our team and show support, and this is a nice way to do it," he said. "It's not going to be easy, but other teams have done it and we're going to do it, too." (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)
Martin Almanza, of San Jose, organizes jerseys, football scarves and memorabilia to sell to Mexico supporters during the game.
Martin Almanza, of San Jose, organizes jerseys, football scarves and memorabilia to sell to Mexico supporters during the game. (Anne Wernikoff/KQED)

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