Study Raises Questions About Value of Early Education

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 (Devin Katayama/KQED)

Almost half of California's kids under the age of five are low-income or speak English as a second language. Most experts agree on the benefit of public preschool programs as a way to prepare these children and reduce the "achievement gap" in the state's classrooms. But as California considers adopting universal preschool for low-income kids, a new study is questioning the long-term benefits of these programs. We examine the research.

Guests:

David L. Kirp, professor of public policy, Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley

Grover J. "Russ" Whitehurst, senior fellow, Center on Children and Families in the Economic Studies program; Brookings Institution

Scott Moore, executive director, Kidango Inc., a non-profit that provides early education in California

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