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New Film Explores History, Ecology of the Russian River

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 (Ingrid Taylar/Flickr)

The Pomo people were drawn to the Russian River for its wealth of fish, and referred to the waterway as “Ashokawna,” or “water to the East.” But pollution, water diversion, drought and other environmental challenges have taken their toll on the health of the 110 mile-long river, which begins in Mendocino County and flows out to the Pacific Ocean at Jenner in Sonoma County. A new documentary examines the state of the Russian River in the context of other troubled watersheds around the world.

THE RUSSIAN RIVER: ALL RIVERS – THE VALUE OF AN AMERICAN WATERSHED from The Russian River: All Rivers on Vimeo.

Guests:

William Sorensen, producer and director of "The Russian River: All Rivers - The Value of an American Watershed"

Don McEnhill, executive director of Russian Riverkeeper

David Keller, Bay Area director of Friends of the Eel River

Doug McIlroy, director of winegrowing for Rodney Strong Vineyards

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