Video Game Makes Old Brains Act Younger

at 10:00 AM
 (Getty Images)

Older adults demonstrated better multitasking skills and other cognitive functions after playing a custom-designed video game, according to a recent UCSF study. After months of playing a driving game called NeuroRacer, seniors were better at remembering information and paying attention. One of the study's co-authors joins us to talk about the potential use of video games as therapeutic tools -- both to improve cognitive skills and treat mental disorders like ADHD, depression and dementia.

In the NeuroRacer game, players are supposed to click a button when a distracting green road sign pops up. (Video: The Gazzaley Lab)

Guests:

Adam Gazzaley, co-author of the study, director of the Neuroscience Imaging Center at UCSF and co-founder of the company Akili Interactive Labs, which is developing the next generation of the NeuroRacer game

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