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Point Reyes Residents Push for Darker Skies

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night sky with stars
The night sky seen from Highway 1 near Tomales in Marin County, California. (Florian Kainz via Getty Images)

Point Reyes may be known for its cows and lighthouse, but locals also want it to become a destination for darkness. Residents have petitioned to certify part of Marin County as a Dark Sky Reserve. But, persuading some people to dim their lights has turned out to be a challenge. Those efforts are just one part of an international movement to reduce light pollution and preserve dark skies. While the invention of the lightbulb – less than 150 years ago – changed the course of human history, excessive use of artificial light has become a nuisance that disrupts the wellbeing of humans, wildlife, and the planet. We’ll talk about light pollution, stargazing and the benefits of darker skies.

Guests:

Josh Riedel, author of the novel "Please Report Your Bug Here" and the recent article "Saving the Night Sky," which was published in Esquire magazine<br />

John Barentine, astronomer and founder, Dark Sky Consulting, LLC; former director of public policy, International Dark Sky Association

Peggy Day, Point Reyes Station resident and dark-sky advocate; cofounder, DarkSky West Marin<br />

Don Jolley, astronomy teacher and storyteller, DarkSky West Marin

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