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Cold Soup and Hot Tea: What We Eat When Summer Heats Up

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Halo halo, a Filipino dessert with mixtures of shaved ice and evaporated milk with boiled sweet beans, coconut, sago, gulaman, tubers and fruits.
Halo halo, a Filipino dessert with mixtures of shaved ice and evaporated milk with boiled sweet beans, coconut, sago, gulaman, tubers and fruits. (Sergio Amiti via Getty Images)

Temperatures have been reaching what passes as warm in and around San Francisco, and in other parts of the Bay Area it’s legitimately hot. We’ll talk about what we eat and drink when the temperatures soar. Do you sweat it out with a spicy hot soup or cool down with a block of cold tofu? Do you seek out halo-halo, Italian ice or a bomb pop? We’re talking about hot weather foods in a summer edition of All You Can Eat, our regular segment with KQED Food Editor Luke Tsai.

Guests:

Luke Tsai, food editor, KQED

Nora Haron, executive chef, SanDai Restaurant + Kopi Bar - opening in Walnut Creek in the fall

Amod Chopra, second generation owner, Vik's Chaat

Christian Reynoso, chef, recipe developer, cooking columnist, SF Chronicle

Martin Bournhonesqu, farmer , local CSA and sells produce to restaurants

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