The Personal Toll of ‘Chronic Catastrophe’ Caused By Climate Change

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Margaret Curzon looks out at the destruction caused by the Tubbs fire while holding items of emotional importance salvaged from her childhood home in the Coffey Park neighborhood on October 15, 2017 in Santa Rosa, California. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images)

Sonoma County has seen a 100-year flood, a historic drought and six major wildfires that have left death and destruction in their wake, and subjected residents to months of bad air days and routine power shut-offs -- just in the last four years. What does living with chronic catastrophes like these do to  people? How does it affect their minds, bodies and spirits? The four-part podcast, “Chronic Catastrophe,” led by journalism students at Santa Rosa Junior College, takes up that question, interviewing experts and local residents about the real impacts of climate change on people’s lives. We’ll talk with the podcast’s producers about the series and their own personal experiences coping through “chronic catastrophe.”

Guests:

Lauren Spates, co-host and producer, "Chronic Catastrophe" podcast, Santa Rosa Junior College

Nick Vides, co-host and producer, "Chronic Catastrophe" podcast, Santa Rosa Junior College

Maritza Camacho, co-host and producer, "Chronic Catastrophe" podcast, Santa Rosa Junior College

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