Why Singer Selena’s Star Still Shines Bright 25 Years After Her Death

52 min
at 10:00 AM
Fans hold a photo of Selena during the ceremony honoring singer Selena Quintanilla with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Nov. 3, 2017, in Hollywood, Calif.  (TARA ZIEMBA/AFP via Getty Images)

Twenty-five years after her death, Tejano singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez enjoys rare staying power among generations of fans who love her music, fashion and performances. A new hit Netflix series about her rise to stardom builds on that legacy.  Selena grew up singing Tejano music with her family band, Selena y Los Dinos, and was a platinum-selling artist when she was murdered in 1995 at the age of 23. Today, Selena’s level of fame, influence and commercial success is still rare for other American-born Latinas in music and entertainment to achieve. We discuss why Selena remains so relevant and her evolving role as a Mexican-American icon.

Guests:

Maria Garcia, creator and host of the forthcoming "Anything for Selena" podcast and senior editor of arts and culture at WBUR in Boston

Deborah R. Vargas, associate professor of Chicana/Latina feminism and U.S.-Mexico borderlands culture at Rutgers University and author of "Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of La Onda" 

Suzy Exposito, music reporter, Los Angeles Times

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