Crashed Boeing Jets Lacked Optional Safety Features

28 min
at 9:30 AM
Employees work in the cargo hold of a Boeing 727 MAX 9 test plane outside the company's factory, on March 14, 2019 in Renton, Washington. The 737 MAX, Boeing's newest model, has been been grounded by aviation authorities throughout the world after the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX 8 on March 10. (Photo: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images))

The Boeing jets that crashed in Ethiopia and Indonesia both lacked safety features that Boeing charged an extra fee to install. That's according to a New York Times report that says the optional features could have helped pilots detect the problem that led to the crashes. Forum discusses the latest updates on the Boeing 737 Max crashes and whether the Federal Aviation Administration met its responsibility to ensure the safety of the planes.

Guests:

Natalie Kitroeff, business reporter, New York Times

Jeff Wise, science journalist, private pilot; author, "The Taking of MH370"

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