Bay Delta Plan Pits San Francisco Against Environmentalists

32 min
at 9:00 AM
The California Aqueduct on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley north of Los Banos. March 2015.  (Dan Brekke/KQED)

A plan to restore rivers and salmon habitat is pitting environmentalists against the city of San Francisco. Originating in the Sierra Nevada snowpack, the rivers are diverted to provide water to farms and cities across California. Now, the State Water Resources Control Board has proposed its Bay Delta Plan, which would reinstate 40 percent of the flow to rivers and help the struggling salmon. Critics of the Bay Delta Plan -- including the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission -- say it would lead to mandatory water restrictions and raise the cost of water. Meanwhile, some farmers in the Central Valley say the plan will cost jobs. We'll discuss the latest chapter in California's water wars.

Related Coverage:
San Francisco Is Fighting California’s Plan to Save Salmon. Wait. What?

Guests:

Lauren Sommer, science and environment reporter, KQED

Peter Drekmeier, policy director, Tuolumne River Trust

Michael Carlin, deputy general manager, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission

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