The Ethics of Assessing President Trump's Mental State

52 min
at 10:00 AM
President Donald Trump leaves the CIA headquarters after speaking to 300 people on January 21, 2017 in Langley, Virginia . Trump spoke with about 300 people in his first official visit with a government agency. In the background a military aid carries the 'football,' with launch codes for nuclear weapons. (Photo: Olivier Doulier/Pool/Getty Images)

Ever since President Trump announced his candidacy, journalists, armchair therapists and mental health professionals have posited theories about his psychological state. To some, Trump is a pathological narcissist; to others, his unpredictability is what makes him effective. Still others, referencing the American Psychiatric Association's “Goldwater Rule,” say all psychological evaluation of the president should be left to his own doctors. We talk about the science, politics and ethics of assessing Trump’s mental health with two contributors to the new collection “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump.”

Guests:

Robert Lifton, psychiatrist; contributor, "The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President"

Thomas Singer, psychiatrist and Jungian analyst; contributor, "The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President"

Samuel Barondes, professor emeritus of psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco

Sponsored

Sponsored

Volume
KQED Live
Live Stream
Log In ToPledge-Free Stream
LATEST NEWSCAST
KQED
NPR
Live Stream information currently unavailable.
Share
LATEST NEWSCAST
KQED
NPR
KQED Live

Live Stream

Live Stream information currently unavailable.