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Techno-Sociologist Zeynep Tufekci on the 'Power and Fragility of Networked Protest'

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Hundreds gather for a Black Lives rally outside Los Angeles Police Department headquarters on July 12, 2016 in Los Angeles, California, where people demonstrated following recent police shootings in the US of civilians amid concerns of frayed relations between police and minority communities. (Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Zeynep Tufekci has been studying and participating in global social movements for more than a decade. Nowadays, she says, a tweet can unleash a global awareness campaign, and a Facebook post can mobilize millions. But, she argues, the political achievements of many modern social movements, such as Occupy, are not proportional to the energy and crowds they inspired. Tufekci, a ‘techno-sociologist’ and author of the new book “Twitter and Tear Gas,” joins us to talk about networked social movements and why some fail where others succeed.

Guests:

Zeynep Tufekci, associate professor, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; author, "Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest."

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