Final Stretch of Dakota Access Pipeline Stopped by Obama Administration

23 min
at 10:00 AM
Fireworks fill the night sky above Oceti Sakowin Camp as activists celebrate after learning an easement had been denied for the Dakota Access Pipeline near the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota.  (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

In a win for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and environmental activists, the federal government on Sunday denied a permit that would have allowed completion of the last 1,100 feet of a 1,200 mile oil pipeline across the Midwest. The stretch in question, which the tribe says would contaminate their water supply and disturb sacred sites, would cross a Missouri River reservoir. The decision to deny the permit has come under fire from supporters who say the pipeline is a key energy project. President-elect Donald Trump's transition team reiterated on Monday that it supports the pipeline, raising serious questions about how long the decision will stand.

Guests:

Lynda Mapes, environment reporter, The Seattle Times

James MacPherson, reporter, Associated Press

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