Addiction is an Illness, Not 'a Moral Failing,' Says Surgeon General

52 min
at 9:00 AM
Drugs are prepared to shoot intravenously by a user addicted to heroin on February 6, 2014 in St. Johnsbury Vermont.  (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The U.S. surgeon general released a landmark report this month calling for "a cultural shift in how we think about addiction." The report also states that addiction is a chronic illness, not a moral failing, and comes at a time when one in seven Americans will experience substance abuse at some point in their lives. We'll discuss the report, why the stigma surrounding addiction is so pervasive and share ideas for improving access to effective treatment.

More Information:

Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health

Guests:

Jim Hood, founder, Facing Addiction

Anna Lembke, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Stanford University Medical Center; author, "Drug Dealer, MD: How Doctors Were Duped, Patients Got Hooked, and Why It's So Hard to Stop

Constance Weisner, professor in the Department of Psychiatry, UCSF; an author of "Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health"

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