Local Artist Arrested After Helping Hang 'Resist' Banner Near White House

Greenpeace protesters unfold a banner reading "Resist" from atop a construction crane behind the White House January 25, 2017 in Washington, DC. The banner, flying high enough to be seen from the White House, is in opposition to the policies of President Donald Trump. (Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

San Francisco muralist Nancy Pili Hernandez faces multiple charges after joining six other Greenpeace protesters Wednesday in climbing a 270-foot tall construction crane blocks from the White House, and unfurling a massive orange and yellow banner emblazoned with the word, "RESIST."

The protesters were taken into custody after climbing down from the crane at 10pm that night. Arresting officers charged them with second-degree burglary, unlawful entry and destruction of property, according to the Associated Press.

Pili Hernandez announced the protest on a Facebook live video posted to Greenpeace's page. On the video she only refers to herself as Nancy.

Greenpeace protesters unfold a banner reading "Resist" from atop a construction crane behind the White House January 25, 2017 in Washington, DC. The banner, flying high enough to be seen from the White House, is in opposition to the policies of President Donald Trump.
Greenpeace protesters unfold a banner reading "Resist" from atop a construction crane behind the White House January 25, 2017 in Washington, DC. The banner, flying high enough to be seen from the White House, is in opposition to the policies of President Donald Trump. (Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

“We are hoping that people are looking up today and seeing that the resistance is strong, though the opposition in front of us seems to be adamant about dividing the people of this country,” Pili Hernandez said in the video. “It is a message to this administration, but more than that, this message is a hand-painted love letter to you. This is a message to the people. This is a message to everybody who marched this weekend, everybody who couldn’t make it, everybody who’s working in their community for environmental or social justice.”

The protest came on the same day President Donald Trump signed executive orders that delayed the implementation of at least 30 environmental rules, and froze new Environmental Protection Agency contracts and grant awards.

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Pili Hernandez is a social justice muralist and one of the subjects in a series of short documentaries called Real Hood Hero,  which you can watch on YouTube. She's also a member of the artist collective Trust Your Struggle. Fellow member Cece Carpio said today “We’re in a crazy time right now, and art is one of the tools to resist.

"We’re resisting the lies they (the Trump administration) have been telling," Carpio said, "the hate that they’ve been spreading, the sexism the Islamophobia, all the hate. It's not what we stand for."

Below is Cece Carpio's sketch of Pili Hernandez

A photo posted by Cece Carpio (@cececarpio) on

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