Dyke March Brings Thousands to the Mission on Day 2 of SF Pride Weekend — And It Was Glorious

Heron, left, and Endora hula hoop together amidst Pride celebrations at Dolores Park. For Endora, Pride is about complete acceptance. 'It’s about being free to flow with life, and the circumstances that are presenting themselves. It’s flexibility while still maintaining a sense of who we are, who I am, and I am a lesbian. People may deny that, people may not accept that, but I am a lesbian. That is a philosophy that is feminine [and] the feminine has a voice.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)

A day after the Trans March kicked off San Francisco Pride weekend at Dolores Park, revelers were back at the park on Saturday for the 27th annual Dyke March.

Like the Trans March on Friday, the Dyke March featured a day full of festivities at Dolores Park before an evening march through the Mission.

"Pride to me means the freedom for everyone to love and be in relationships with people without judgement and with the freedom to live our lives without oppression," said Namoi Tucker, who has been at every Dyke March since it began in 1993. "On this 50th anniversary of Stonewall I think Pride is something we should all be thinking about in terms of everyone’s liberation."

Thousands of people gather at Dolores Park on a beautiful sunny day. Picture looks like something out of a movie.
Thousands of people gather at Dolores Park to celebrate San Francisco Pride and the Dyke March on June 29, 2019. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Man waves pride flag high during Pride festivities at Dolores Park
The Pride flag waves high during Pride festivities at Dolores Park on June 29, 2019. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
A man waves a huge rainbow umbrella next to an ice cream cart.
David Flores, left, waves a giant rainbow umbrella in support of Leo Elderflower's slushie stand named 'Slushie Party.' David says, 'Pride is celebrating my life. The whole reason I moved to San Francisco is because I could be gay and express my fluidity. i want to be able to be as loud and proud as I can be without having any remorse. Pride is when I feel alive, but Pride is not just one day, it’s not just one month. It’s all year, so let’s celebrate our life all year.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Dad wears rainbow jacket and hugs daughter who is wearing colorful outfit.
Proud dad Dan Zigmond has come to Pride every year since his daughter, Maxine, came out. 'Pride means my daughter. I’m here with her.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Two men hols banners that say "Glide Pride Team."
As part of Glide Memorial Church's Pride Team, Stacy Pearson, right, and Larry Byes, left, spread love to the community during Pride. Stacy says, 'I want to bring more awareness to feminine people like myself. I want young boys out there who are questioning themselves or are unsure of themselves to know it’s OK to be you. Express your femininity is what I want to tell people. It’s not hurting anyone. It’s being proud.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
With her niece, Marcela O'Connor, right, and close family friend Toni Ellyson (M), for Serina Koester (L) are wearing summer clothes and flowers on their head.
Serena Koester left, with niece Marcela O'Connor, right, and close family friend Toni Ellyson, center. Koester says Pride is all about family: 'I’ve been coming out here with my niece and our close family friends for many years now, and I feel so grateful for being able to share that across generations and just representing that love is in all of us.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
The first line of marchers for San Francisco's 2019 Dyke March lead the way from Dolores Park on June 29, 2019.
The first line of marchers for San Francisco's 2019 Dyke March lead the way from Dolores Park on June 29, 2019. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Naomi Tucker, a woman with black curly hair is wearing a black tank top and rainbow-colored butterfly wings.
Naomi Tucker has been going to Pride since she was 21 and has been a part of San Francisco's Dyke March every year since the first march in 1993. 'Pride to me means the freedom for everyone to love and be in relationships with people without judgement and with the freedom to live our lives without oppression. On this 50th anniversary of Stonewall I think Pride is something we should all be thinking about in terms of everyone’s liberation.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Partners Victoria Miycue and DC Alcalá wear black cowboy hats, hold a small Mexican flag and a yellow sign that say "Human Rights Have No Borders."
Alongside her partner, Victoria Miycue, left, Pride for DC Alcalá, right, is all about visibility and is happy to see the turnout of especially LGBTQ people of color. 'Pride to me means visibility, organizing, coming together as a community and calling attention to many of the issues right now, especially in this time with the powers that be in charge. Many women’s rights are being taken away, queer people's rights, violence against trans people, and LGBTQ people of color are not visible in the Pride mainstream.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
A woman with long hair, wearing a black leather jacket and a bikini top rides her motorcycle down the march.
A small contingent of motorcyclists kick off the Dyke March by leading marchers down 18th Street as supporters cheer from the sidelines. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
A person on a motorcycle waves a rainbow flag.
Crowds gather to cheer motorcyclists who lead the march down 18th Street. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
A person rolls down the parade in their electric wheelchair.
Supporters cheer as participants in the Dyke March make their way down 18th Street. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Dancers with orange and green skirts and white tops dance on the street during the march.
Led by live percussion music, dancers gracefully move down the streets leading a second group of marchers. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Three attendees wear extravagant outfits, platforms shoes, fishnets, cheetah prints, wigs and make up.
From left: Hollow Eve, Dottie Lux and Gia Fagnelli join the march down Valencia Street. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Group of marchers of all shapes, sizes and colors march down the street.
Marchers celebrate San Francisco Pride walking toward the Castro. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
A couple holds hands as they walk down the street.
Marchers walk hand in hand through the streets of San Francisco. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)

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