The transgender pride flag is held high during the Trans March at Dolores Park on June 28, 2019. Sruti Mamidanna/KQED
The transgender pride flag is held high during the Trans March at Dolores Park on June 28, 2019. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)

PHOTOS: SF Pride Weekend Kicks Off With Trans March

PHOTOS: SF Pride Weekend Kicks Off With Trans March

Thousands of people filled Dolores Park and marched down Market Street on Friday as part of the 16th annual Trans March.

Held on the Friday of Pride weekend since 2004, the Trans March is billed as the largest trans Pride event in San Francisco and one of the largest in the world. Daytime festivities included a resource fair, family area and musical and dance performances at Dolores Park, all leading up to a march down Market Street toward Taylor and Turk streets in honor of the 1966 riot at Compton's Cafeteria led by transgender women.

"We have so much to celebrate, and it’s important to be out here in celebration with community and allies," said Sister Golda Lox of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, "(but) also it's a place for us to rise up against the still many things we need to fight for and towards with community and love."

'I’m a proud queer trans woman of color,' said Sera Fernando. 'I want to empower the most marginalized communities of the LGBTQ wide spectrum, especially black trans women, to achieve more.'
'I’m a proud queer trans woman of color,' said Sera Fernando. 'I want to empower the most marginalized communities of the LGBTQ wide spectrum, especially black trans women, to achieve more.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Enrique Cancél bikes through the Trans March crowd at Dolores Park. Cancél has lived in San Francisco for 25 years and attended every Pride celebration. 'This is a gathering of the tribes. This is when we come out in celebration and try to be as inclusive as we can be. It’s wonderful.'
Enrique Cancél bikes through the Trans March crowd at Dolores Park. Cancél has lived in San Francisco for 25 years and attended every Pride celebration. 'This is a gathering of the tribes. This is when we come out in celebration and try to be as inclusive as we can be. It’s wonderful.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Hundreds gathered in Dolores Park for a day of Trans March festivities before being joined by more people for an evening march through the city.
Hundreds gathered in Dolores Park for a day of Trans March festivities before being joined by more people for an evening march through the city. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Sister Golda Lox (R) alongside Sister Uma Bushburns (L) at Dolores Park. For Sister Golda Lox, Pride is an important time for celebration and awareness. 'We have so much to celebrate and it’s important to be out here in celebration with community and allies, (but) also it's a place for us to rise up against the still many things we need to fight for and towards with community and love." Written around Sister Golda Lox's skirt are the names of some of the trans women that have been murdered in 2018 and 2019.
Sister Golda Lox (R) alongside Sister Uma Bushburns (L) at Dolores Park. For Sister Golda Lox, Pride is an important time for celebration and awareness. 'We have so much to celebrate and it’s important to be out here in celebration with community and allies, (but) also it's a place for us to rise up against the still many things we need to fight for and towards with community and love." Written around Sister Golda Lox's skirt are the names of some of the trans women that have been murdered in 2018 and 2019. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
The first line of marchers in the 2019 Trans March lead the way down Market Street. The Trans March has taken place on the Friday of Pride weekend since 2004.
The first line of marchers in the 2019 Trans March lead the way down Market Street. The Trans March has taken place on the Friday of Pride weekend since 2004. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
The Trans March starts down Market Street before turning down Taylor Street toward Turk Street and the site of the 1966 Compton's Cafeteria riot led by transgender women.
The Trans March starts down Market Street before turning down Taylor Street toward Turk Street and the site of the 1966 Compton's Cafeteria riot led by transgender women. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Two people embrace along Market Street during the Trans March.
Two people embrace along Market Street during the Trans March. (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Teo Octavia (R), poses with friend and fellow API Equality member, Ethan Li (L). Teo is a documentary filmmaker and organizer who specifically works with queer transgender Asian American youth in Oakland. 'For me Pride means building resilience and healing among our youth so they can continue to persist and resist until they’ve reached their wildest dreams and fulfilled their wildest visions. To know that they belong, that they have a home, and that they will be powerful change-makers today and in the future.'
Teo Octavia (R), poses with friend and fellow API Equality member, Ethan Li (L). Teo is a documentary filmmaker and organizer who specifically works with queer transgender Asian American youth in Oakland. 'For me Pride means building resilience and healing among our youth so they can continue to persist and resist until they’ve reached their wildest dreams and fulfilled their wildest visions. To know that they belong, that they have a home, and that they will be powerful change-makers today and in the future.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)
Resting under a sign that reads, 'Everyday needs a splash of fairy dust," Kenny Cowan and David Starkovich cheer on marchers and encourage everyone to 'believe in magic.'
Resting under a sign that reads, 'Everyday needs a splash of fairy dust," Kenny Cowan and David Starkovich cheer on marchers and encourage everyone to 'believe in magic.' (Sruti Mamidanna/KQED)

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