Two girls explore the Lego station at the 'makerspace' at the Girls' Festival. In addition to the makerspace, the festival featured panels and workshops, including a 'Girlpreneur' pitch competition. 'I liked how the girls like came up with their own business ideas... these girls they take chances and risks to do what they want,' said 11-year-old attendee Riley Wilson. Muna Danish/KQED
Two girls explore the Lego station at the 'makerspace' at the Girls' Festival. In addition to the makerspace, the festival featured panels and workshops, including a 'Girlpreneur' pitch competition. 'I liked how the girls like came up with their own business ideas... these girls they take chances and risks to do what they want,' said 11-year-old attendee Riley Wilson. (Muna Danish/KQED)

PHOTOS: Bay Area Girls Pitch, Build and Connect at Annual Girls' Festival

PHOTOS: Bay Area Girls Pitch, Build and Connect at Annual Girls' Festival

1 min

More than 3,000 people came out to the third annual Girls' Festival on Saturday at Santa Clara University. The event brought together women and girls for career workshops, performances and hands-on activities.

The campus was packed with girls and their families coming from all over the Bay Area and as far away as Southern California. They participated in workshops on topics including building a droid robot and design thinking, as well as conversations around understanding consent and a “Girlpreneur” pitch competition.

“It’s really important that we as women and girls understand that we have such power, and there are amazing resources out there to help us become powerful,” said Maureen Broderick, founder of WorldWideWomen, which organized the event.

Girls' Festival also offered one-on-one mentoring, a "makerspace" and a pop-up marketplace featuring young female entrepreneurs.

Jada Jackson from Oakland, 10, stands at her booth at the pop-up marketplace featuring young girl entrepreneurs. She was selling her handmade headbands and hairbows.
Jada Jackson from Oakland, 10, stands at her booth at the pop-up marketplace featuring young girl entrepreneurs. She was selling her handmade headbands and hair bows. (Muna Danish/KQED)
Tanya Akbar brought her two daughters and niece from Oakland to Girls' Festival. 'I thought it would be important for them to see young girls in entrepreneur and leader roles, and really see the importance of coming together and supporting and uplifting one another.'
Tanya Akbar brought her two daughters and niece from Oakland to Girls' Festival. 'I thought it would be important for them to see young girls in entrepreneur and leader roles, and really see the importance of coming together and supporting and uplifting one another.' (Muna Danish/KQED)
Aileen Zhong talks with visitors at Girls' Festival. Zhong is with Ignite, an organization in Oakland that supports women in politics. 'It’s really important for young women to know why voting matters and why their voice matters so that they can become the next change-makers in their community.'
Aileen Zhong talks with visitors at Girls' Festival. Zhong is with Ignite, an organization in Oakland that supports women in politics. 'It’s really important for young women to know why voting matters and why their voice matters so that they can become the next change-makers in their community.' (Muna Danish/KQED)
Huda Navaid, a student at Santa Clara University, spoke on a panel about advocacy and social change. 'I’ve had to overcome a lot of hardship in my childhood, and I wanted to use all of my experiences to really make an impact. And I want to teach other young women who have gone through a lot in their life how to overcome and use their empathy to make an impact.'
Huda Navaid, a student at Santa Clara University, spoke on a panel about advocacy and social change. 'I’ve had to overcome a lot of hardship in my childhood, and I wanted to use all of my experiences to really make an impact. And I want to teach other young women who have gone through a lot in their life how to overcome and use their empathy to make an impact.' (Muna Danish/KQED)
A young girl writes on a response board at the Girls' Festival. 'We call it a day of power and possibility. As women and girls we need to know there are so many opportunities for us to shine, and expand, and become leaders,' said Maureen Broderick, founder and CEO of WorldWideWomen, which organized the event.
A young girl writes on a response board at the Girls' Festival. 'We call it a day of power and possibility. As women and girls we need to know there are so many opportunities for us to shine, and expand, and become leaders,' said Maureen Broderick, founder and CEO of WorldWideWomen, which organized the event. (Muna Danish/KQED)

Sponsored

Sponsored

Volume
KQED Live
Live Stream
LATEST NEWSCAST
KQED
NPR
Live Stream information currently unavailable.
Share
LATEST NEWSCAST
KQED
NPR
KQED Live

Live Stream

Live Stream information currently unavailable.