How to Make Streets Safer for Pedestrians as Fatalities Rise

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Data has shown an increase in pedestrian traffic fatalities. (iStock)

Pedestrian deaths increased 46% nationwide in the past decade, while the number of all other traffic deaths rose by just 5%. Black pedestrians were killed at a rate 82% higher than whites, and residents of  low-income neighborhoods are far more likely to be struck by a car and killed than people in higher income neighborhoods. We hear from experts about the role vehicle speed, smart phones, and our enduring attachment to SUV’s are playing in the tragic, and unequal, rise in deaths. And, we talk with a mother whose son died in a pedestrian accident about what urgently needs to be done to make streets safer.

Guests:

Offer Grembek, Co‐Director at University of California Berkeley’s Safe Transportation Research and Education Center (SafeTREC), a research center affiliated with the UC Berkeley School of Public Health and the UC Berkeley Institute of Transportation Studies

Gina LaBlanc, retired Santa Clara County nurse, member of San Francisco Bay Area Families for Safe Streets

Angie Schmitt, journalist, author of "RIGHT OF WAY: Race, Class, and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America" and founder at 3MPH Planning and Consulting, focused on pedestrian safety

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