Proposition 64 Lets California Voters Have Their Say on Recreational Use of Marijuana

52 min
at 9:00 AM
A vendor weighs buds for card-carrying medical marijuana patients attending Los Angeles' first-ever cannabis farmer's market at the West Coast Collective medical marijuana dispensary on July 4, 2014. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

Twenty years ago Californians legalized the medicinal use of marijuana with Proposition 215. Now, voters are deciding whether to legalize the recreational use of the drug. Proposition 64 would make it legal for adults 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana. Residents could also grow up to six pot plants at home. The measure would impose taxes on the sale of pot, potentially bringing in hundreds of millions of dollars to the state, much of which would go to drug education programs. Supporters say Proposition 64 is a way to regulate a drug that is already widely used. Opponents, including many in the marijuana industry, say this ballot measure doesn't go about legalization in the correct way.

Additional Information:

More Proposition 64 Coverage
KQED's Election 2016 Guide

Guests:

Amanda Reiman, policy manager for California, Drug Policy Alliance

Andrew Acosta, spokesperson, NO on 64

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