What Happens When A Hot New Restaurant Transforms An Established Old Neighborhood

4 min
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - APRIL 25: A woman walks outside of City Hall on April 25, 2019 in Los Angeles, California, According to a Bloomberg study of the most recent Bureau of Economic Analysis data, Los Angeles County produced the highest gross domestic product (GDP) of any county in the country in 2015. The $656 billion produced was approximate to the economic clout of Saudi Arabia. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Frank Shyong of the Los Angeles Times about how popular restaurants, and the clients they attract, are changing places like L.A.'s Chinatown.

In it, Shapiro asks the tough question: "Is there a way for well-intentioned people to bring investment and foot traffic to a neighborhood with a long history without trampling on that history?"

What Happens When A Hot New Restaurant Transforms An Established Old Neighborhood

What Happens When A Hot New Restaurant Transforms An Established Old Neighborhood

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