upper waypoint
"Flowers for Immigration," a photo series created and curated by designer Liziana Cruz captures floral arrangements created by the men and women working in bodegas cross New York city. Lenny Letter and Lizania Cuz
"Flowers for Immigration," a photo series created and curated by designer Liziana Cruz captures floral arrangements created by the men and women working in bodegas cross New York city. (Lenny Letter and Lizania Cuz)

‘Say it with Flowers’: A Petaled Present of Presidential Protest

‘Say it with Flowers’: A Petaled Present of Presidential Protest

Save ArticleSave Article
Failed to save article

Please try again

Coming of age in Oakland’s Fruitvale community, there were a few things that rose to the level of certainty: a) come Saturday morning, my neighborhood would be alive with a blaring mix of vintage R&B soul and mariachi music, b) messages delivered at my school assemblies would be translated into at least two languages, and c) I’d hear one expression so often, at times I’d start to despise it: melting pot. As a child, the phrase prompted me to imagine a gigantic cast iron witch’s pot, perched on a makeshift fire, as multicolored glittery confections cascaded inside and joined the circular rhythm of an ore-sized wooden spoon. It wouldn’t be a stretch to say I had a penchant for daydreaming.

100Days_300x300z

Now, more than 25 years later and more than 3,000 miles away, Dominican-born New York-based designer Lizania Cruz has translated that melting-pot ethos into a powerful message for the newly inaugurated president. She calls it, simply, Flowers for Immigration.

When one thinks of protest art, one doesn’t often immediately think of flower arrangement. But in bringing together flowers of different countries, not only do the women of Flowers for Immigration create floral microcosms of the country’s diversity; in their carefully thought-out selections, they also make as much of a statement as a towering, colorful freeway mural. And in doing so, they remind us that even our seemingly small daily acts can be an artistic expression of something much more significant.

Q.Logo.Break

Sponsored

Read more about Lizania Cruz’s Flowers for Immigration here.

 

lower waypoint
next waypoint
The Stud, SF's Oldest Queer Bar, Gears Up for a Grand ReopeningThis Sleek Taiwanese Street Food Lounge Serves Beef Noodle Soup Until 2:30 a.m.Minnie Bell’s New Soul Food Restaurant in the Fillmore Is a HomecomingHow a Dumpling Chef Brought Dim Sum to Bay Area Farmers Markets5 New Mysteries and Thrillers for Your Nightstand This SpringYou Can Get Free Ice Cream on Tuesday — No CatchOutside Lands 2024: Tyler, the Creator, The Killers and Sturgill Simpson HeadlineLarry June to Headline Stanford's Free BlackfestSol Blume Festival Postponed Until 2025A ‘Haunted Mansion’ Once Stood Directly Under Sutro Tower