World Affairs
World Affairs

World Affairs is a nationally syndicated radio broadcast that airs every Monday at 8:00 pm on KQED public radio and uploaded to for rebroadcast by NPR stations across the nation. World Affairs brings you, the listener, informative and engaging conversations that explore issues and opportunities that transcends borders. Tune in to hear thought leaders, change makers and engaged citizens share ideas and learn from one another in conversations that matter. Founded in 1947, following the San Francisco conference that established the United Nations, World Affairs remains one of the most vibrant global affairs organizations in the United States.

Airs on:
MON 8pm-9pm, TUE 2am-3am, SAT 4am-5am
59 min

Border Wars: The Stakes of the Trump Administration's Immigration Policy

President Trump made building a border wall between the US and Mexico a cornerstone of his 2016 presidential campaign. Since taking office, he has called for a travel ban on people from Muslim countries.  He has limited the rights of asylum seekers and presided over a family separation crisis at the southern border. New York Times journalists Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Michael Shear discuss the decisions and the ideologies shaping US immigration policy with  WorldAffairs co-host Markos Kounalakis. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
59 min

Is Liberal Capitalism at Risk of Failing in 2020?

Protests from Paris to Santiago share themes of resentment towards economic policies that are seen as inherently unfair. These very public demonstrations show how, in many countries, citizens are losing faith in free market democracy, which emerged triumphant over communism and fascism in the 20th century. As the new world order is being reshaped, which form of government and governance will be ascendant? Stanford University’s Larry Diamond and Francis Fukuyama join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to discuss what’s at stake for liberal market democracy and the changing world order. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
59 min

Iran - United States Tensions

The killing of Iran’s most important general by an American drone and a subsequent Iranian missile attack on US assets inside Iraq, threatened to bring the United States and Iran closer to war than at any time since the hostage crisis in 1979. The U.S and Iran may have taken a step back from the brink, but underlying tensions between the two nations remain. In this episode, we look at the circumstances that led to this escalation. And we get an overview of how recent events impact the balance of power in the Persian Gulf. What are the strategic implications for Iran, the Middle East and the World? Vali Nasr of Johns Hopkins University, Barbara Slavin of the Future of Iran Initiative at the Atlantic Council and NPR’s Jane Arraf join WorldAffairs co-host Ray Suarez to talk about what US actions mean for the Middle East and the rest of the world. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
59 min

Don't Be Evil: Has Big Tech Betrayed Its Founding Principles -- and All of Us?

"Don’t be evil." It’s an iconic phrase that was written into Google’s code of conduct during the early days of the company. It conveyed a utopian vision for technology that would make the world better, safer and more prosperous. But twenty years later, has big tech lived up to its founding principles or has it lost its soul? Rana Foroohar, Global Business Columnist at The Financial Times and Global Economic Analyst at CNN, documents the bigger implications for how tech companies now operate.  In her conversation with World Affairs CEO, Philip Yun, Foroohar looks at the extent to which the FAANGs (Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google) threaten democracies, livelihoods and our thinking. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
6 min

Bonus Episode: Meet World Affairs’ New CEO, Philip Yun

After 21 years as CEO and host of WorldAffairs, Jane Wales has moved on to join the Aspen Institute. In this bonus episode, Jane says farewell and sits down with Philip Yun, WorldAffairs’ new CEO, for a brief conversation about his vision for the future of WorldAffairs. While working on North Korea policy under President Clinton, he learned that context matters. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
59 min

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 3: Policy and Polity

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This is the third episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. Governments are accused of letting the social safety net disintegrate for the many while facilitating vast economic gains for the few. An ever-expanding wealth gap has reinforced these views. Jason Furman, economics professor at Harvard, and Gillian Tett, US managing editor for the Financial Times, discuss what role governments can play in forging solutions with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
59 min

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 2: Corporate Interests: Shareholder or Stakeholder?

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This is the second episode of our 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective.  Since deregulation in the 1980’s, the only stakeholder that has mattered to business is the shareholder. Jay Coen Gilbert, co-founder of B-Lab, and Colin Mayer, professor at Oxford University and author of “Prosperity: Better Businesses Makes The Greater Good,” discuss why the corporate culture may be at an inflection point with WorldAffairs Co-host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
59 min

Rebuilding the Social Contract, Part 1: We, the People

While globalization has lifted millions out of poverty, the geopolitical forces that drove it have largely left the middle class behind. There is a growing sense that the social contract established after WWII is broken.  This week and for the following 2 weeks, we’re featuring a 3-part series on the rebuilding of that social contract from three distinct perspectives: that of the people, that of the corporate sector, and that of government. This first episode is from the people’s perspective.  What forces caused the social contract to break and more importantly, what can citizens do to rebuild it? Tom Nichols, professor at the Naval War College and author of The Death of Expertise, and Ian Bremmer, president and founder of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media, discuss why the people matter in rebuilding social trust with WorldAffairs Co-Host Ray Suarez. We want to hear from you! Please take part in a quick survey to tell us how we can improve our podcast: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PWZ7KMW
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